Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Round-Up: June 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion continues to outline the career choices being made by the young Caesar: 3.4 Ipse quidem postea in oratione qua laudationi Catonis Ciceronianae respondit , precatus est ne militaris sermo ... cum oratoris ingeniosi et qui multum otii dicendo impendisset, eloquentia compararetur.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today in honor of the sentencing of Mr. Madoff, and all the people who suffered from his misdeeds: Unius peccata tota civitas luit (English: The whole community pays for the crimes of a single person).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Innocentia eloquentia (English: Innocence is eloquence). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Iustitia omnibus (English: Justice for all - in the sense of fiat, "(let there be) justice for all").

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: In labore libertas (English: In work there is freedom... a great little saying that promotes the work ethic).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Littera occidit; Spiritus autem vivificat (II Cor. 3:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Dum stertit cattus, numquam sibi currit in os mus (English: While the cat is snoring, a mouse never just runs into his mouth... a saying tested on a daily basis by my cat, who both likes to hunt mice - and also to nap!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Minervam sus docet (English: The pig is teaching Minerva - in other words, a kind of backwards pedagogy, since the pig has nothing really it can teach the goddess of wisdom).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὰς δεσποίνας αἱ κύνες μιμούμεναι. (English: Dogs imitate their owners - and in Greek, it's clear we are talking about female dogs and their female owners). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Ranae et Rex earum, the story of the foolish frogs who thought they needed a king.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Leo et Capella, the story of a she-goat who wisely resisted the lion's blandishments, and Fiber, the story of the sacrifice the beaver is willing to make in order to save his life. In addition to the new poems for today, I'm also trying out a system for color coding the meter of the elegiac poems - let me know what you think!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE DELPHINO ET SMARIDE (the story of a little fish who had the satisfaction of watching the dead of his nemesis, the dolphin). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Fortuna Divitis et Pauperis, a really unusual fable about the caprices of the goddess Fortune. If anybody else is familiar with this fable, please let me know; I do not think I have seen it anywhere before this.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Imagines in lingua Latina, a read which actually has two kinds of text on each page: there are sentences for you to read side-by-side with the image and the vocabulary underneath. Very nice!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, June 29, 2009

Round-Up: June 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Iulias, which is also the festival of Hercules Musarum, "Hercules of the Muses." You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is about Caesar's early career priorities: 3.3 primo autem renuntiavit, ut potentia et armis potius primus esset omnium, quandoquidem propter bellicarum et civilium rerum tractationem, quibus rempublicam in suam redegit potestatem, non eo pervenit eloquentiae, quo naturalis eum indoles perduxisset.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about acquiring wisdom with the passage of time: Tempus magistrorum optimus est (English: Time is the best of teachers).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Alterum pedem in cymba Charontis habet (English: He's got one foot in Charon's boat). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Vivitur ingenio (English: You need to live by your wits - and luckily for you, in Latin, your wits are your birth-right, in-gen-ium).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Mortui non mordent (English: The dead do not bite).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Quid communicabit caccabus ad ollam? Quando enim conliserint, confringetur (Sirach 13:2). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Cauda de vulpe testatur (English: You can tell the fox by her tail - the fox is proverbially proud of her tail and does not hide it, even when she should).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Boeoticum ingenium (English: The genius of the Boeotians - an ironic saying, since the Boeotians were the proverbial dimwits of the Greek world... at least according to the Athenians).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τῶν καλῶν καὶ τὸ μετόπωρον καλόν ἐστίν (English: Even the autumn of the beautiful is something beautiful... just look at Tina Turner, for example!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Leo et Tauri, a fable about the principle of "divide and conquer."

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Rusticus et Hercules, the wonderful story of how "God helps them that help themselves," and Capra et Lupus, the story of the poor she-goat who was forced to suckle a wolf cub. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE VETULO ET MAGISTRO (the story of the man who no longer valued his faithful old hunting dog). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Piscatores, the story of a fishermen and their dependence on luck for their success.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Since the story of Hercules showed up today in verse form, I thought I would feature here my simplified Hercules in prose: Hercules et Rusictus.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, June 28, 2009

Round-Up: June 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is about Caesar's youthful rhetorical skills: 3.2 Fertur ad civiles orationes Caesar et natura aptissimus fuisse et plurimum in ea re operat posuisse, ut haud dubie secundum laudis locum tenuerit.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about the value of books: Usus libri, non lectio prudentes facit (English: The use of a book, not its reading, makes people wise).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Qui gladio ferit, gladio perit (English: He who wounds by the sword, dies by the sword). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Omitte vatem (English: Let the prophet alone - this is "omitte" in the sense of letting something go, and in this case, specifically to let someone go unharmed, because he is under special protection).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Iuniores ad labores (English: The young people need to get to work - a wonderful little rhyming proverb).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Qui dissipat saepem, mordebit eum coluber (Ecc. 10:8). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Pisces natare oportet (English: Fish gotta swim!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Glaucus comesa herba habitat in mari (English: Having eaten the herb, Glaucus dwells in the sea - the mythical story of this magical herb is told in Ovid).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Λίθοις τὸν Ἣλιον βάλλει (English: He's throwing rocks at the sun... another one of those futile tasks so often singled out in proverbs!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Tubicen, the story of a trumpeter captured by the enemy during a battle.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Taurus et Hircus, the story of a bull fleeing a lion who ran into a goat, and Cucurbita et Pinus, the story of a vine very proud of its summer growth. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE, ASINO ET GALLO (the story of a donkey who thought the lion was afraid of him - much like the goat in the story about the bull and the goat listed above). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Pauper et Thesaurus, the story of a poor man who unexpectedly found a treasure.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Opificum, a catalog of all kinds of trades and crafts in Latin!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, June 27, 2009

Round-Up: June 27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is about Caesar going to school at Rhodes: Secundum haec Syllae potentia iam languescente, a suis in patriam revocatus, Rhodum navigavit ad Apollonium Molonis filium, quem et Cicero audivit, insignem rhetorem et honestorum morum..

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today - although I know it's probably not snowing anywhere where anyone is reading this blog! Quidquid nix celat, solis calor omne revelat (English: Whatever the snow hides, the heat of the sun reveals it all).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Homines plerique ipsi sibi mala parant (English: Many people themselves prepare evils for themselves). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Octipedem excitas (English: You're stirring up an octopus - which is to say, eight-fold trouble!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Ne vile velis (English: Don't crave what is worthless - although that loses the Latin play on words, alas).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Diligite inimicos vestros et benefacite (Luke 6:35). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Leonem radere ne velis (English: Don't go giving the lion a shave - a frightening thought indeed! Leave the lion alone!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Atreo crudelior (English: More cruel than Atreus - which would have to be very cruel indeed, since Atreus killed his own nephews and cooked them up and served them for dinner to his brother Thyestes, the boys' father!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Λύχνου ἀρθέντος, γυνὴ πᾶσα ἡ αὐτή ἐστι (English: When a lantern is brought near, every woman looks the same... of course, the same would hold true for any man as well - but of course the proverb doesn't tell us that, ha ha). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Viperae et Herinacei, a story about some seriously rude hedgehogs!

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Asinus Rubum Comedens, a fable about the donkey who eats brambles and thistles, and Cerva et Vitis, the story of a deer who was most unkind to the vine which had hidden her from the hunters. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE HIRUNDINE ET ALIIS AVICULIS (the story of what happened when the birds rejected the swallow's wise advice). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Vaticinator, the story of a fortune-teller who could not tell his own fortune.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Cuniculus te salutat, a reader by two of Ann Martin's students which is based on singular and plural nouns and verbs:





Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, June 26, 2009

Round-Up: June 26

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 120, which features this saying about how stressful life can be: Cura curam trahit (English: One worry drags in another after it).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion tells what Caesar finally did with the pirates in the end: Verum cum is pecuniae intentus (erat enim haud parva) per otium se de captivis deliberaturum respondisset, valere eo iusso, Caesar Pergamum rediit, productosque in medium universos piratas in crucem egit, quod illis saepe in insula iocans, ut videbatur, praedixerat..

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about the dangers of overreaching: Qui totum vult, totum perdit. (English: He who wants everything, loses everything).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Canes timidi vehementius latrant quam mordent (English: Timid dogs bark more fiercely than they bite). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Mediocria firma (English: Things in the middle are reliable - a proverb about the "golden mean," although the word "mediocrity" has sadly taken on very negative connotations in English, unlike in Latin).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: In portu quies (English: Calm in the harbor... which is why you are so glad to get back home after a stormy day at sea!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Tempus plangendi et tempus saltandi (Ecc. 3:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Bos currum trahit, non bovem currus (English: The ox pulls the cart, not the cart the ox - in other words: don't put your cart before the horse!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Irus et est subito qui modo Croesus erat (English: He's suddenly become an Irus who was just now a Croesus - with Irus being proverbial for poverty and Croesus proverbial for wealth in the ancient world).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἅπαντα τοῖς καλοῖς ἀνδράσι πρέπει (English: For good people, all things are fitting). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Canis Vetulus et Magister, the story of a master who no longer values his aged dog.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Anguilla Captans, in which fishing for eels is a metaphor for scandal-mongering in politics, and Haedus et Lupus, a great story about why children need to listen to their parents' warnings. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE QUERCU ET ARUNDINE (a fable about flexibility). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Mercurius et Tiresias, a funny anecdote about the god Hermes testing the powers of the prophetic Tiresias.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Fabula: Celtus, a reader which is paired with a YouTube video - so be sure to check out the video, too!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Round-Up: June 25

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 119, which features this saying from Horace: Animum debes mutare, non caelum (English: You need to change your state of mind, not your location).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion begins the story of what happened to the pirates after Caesar's release: Itaque pecunia praedae cessit, piratas Pergami in custodiam dedit, et ad praefectum Asiae Iunium abiit, quod illius, utpote praetoris, esset de captivis supplicium sumere.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about the rationale behind car alarms: Fures clamorem metuunt (English: Thieves fear a shout).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ego si bonam famam mihi servavero, sat ero dives (English: If I will keep my good reputation, I will be rich enough). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Deo duce (English: With god as my guide... an English rendering that captures the alliteration of the Latin, too!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Aureo piscatur hamo (English: He's fishing with a hook of gold... which is to say, he's probably fishing for a man, not a fish!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Considerate lilia agri, quomodo crescunt, non laborant nec nent (Matt. 6:28). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Homo ad laborem natus est et avis ad volatum (English: Man is born to labor, and a bird to fly).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Non formosus erat, sed erat facundus Ulixes (English: Odysseus was not elegant, but he was eloquent - which is my best try at capturing the alliteration of the Latin in this one!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἁ δὴ χεὶρ την χεῖρα νίζει (English: One hand does wash another). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Satyrus et Viator, the story of the satyr who rescued a man in the snow.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Asinus in Pelle Leonis, the story of the donkey in the lion skin and how he was apprehended, and Corvus et Scorpion, the story of a bird who went from being predator to prey. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEPORE ET TESTUDINE (the famous story of the tortoise and the hare). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Mulier Venefica, the story of a witch who claimed to offer protection to others but who could not protect herself.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). The materials I wanted to feature today are NOT Latin, but are instead some "spelling" lessons I will be using with my English composition students next year - very nice students but, by and large, very terrible spellers. I hope that the use of proverbs can make their spelling lessons more fun and worthwhile! Here is a link to the four books of Spelling Proverbs which I created today:



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Round-Up: June 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 118, which features this great agricultural saying that lends itself to many other applications: Vacca, quae multum boat, parum lactis habet (English: The cow who moos a lot gives little milk.).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is about what Caesar did when he got away from the pirates: Allatis a Mileto pecuniis cum satis fecisset piratis essetque dimissus, statim navibus instructis adversum eos ex portu Milesiorum est profectus, et stationem adhuc apud insulam habentes nactus, plerosque cepit.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a nice defiant statement from today: Fremant omnes licet, dicam quod sentio (English: Although everybody may roar, I will say what I think).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Suum cuique pulchrum est (English: To each his own is beautiful). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is about mutual friendship: Amicus amico (English: A friend to a friend).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Furem praeda vocat (English: The goods call forth the thief).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Vinum semper bibere aut semper aquam contrarium est; alternis autem uti delectabile (II Macc. 15:39). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Sola apis excellit muscarum milia quinque (English: A single bee exceeds five thousand flies... which is true enough: you still won't get a drop of honey from five thousand flies!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Aethiopem lavas (English: You're washing the Ethiopian - which is one of those proverbial Sisyphean tasks: you will not change the color of someone's skin by scrubbling).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Θάνατον παρδάλεως ὑποκρίνεται. (English: The leopard plays dead... in which case it joins the ranks of other animals notorious for making use of this trick; in the bestiary tradition, the fox is famous for this sneaky behavior!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Mulier et Ancillae, a wonderful fable of unintended consequences.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Puer et Fur, a delightful story of the trickster tricked, and Mus et Ostrea, the sad story of the mouse who did not know how dangerous oysters can be. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ANU ET ANSERE (the famous story of the goose that laid the golden eggs). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Boves Somniantes, the story of some cattle who found out their dreams were not so prophetic after all!

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Parvula Arānea, the story of a spider in the rain.



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Round-Up: June 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem nonum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 117, which features this Latin equivalent of the English saying about "all things that glitter" - Omnia quae nitent aurea non sunt. (All things which shine are not golden).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is about the compositions in verse and prose which Caesar wrote to while away his time as a captive of the pirates: Carmina etiam et orationes quasdam cum scripsisset, iis recitabat, et qui non laudassent, eos palam barbaros rudesque appellabat, ac saepe per risum minabatur, se eos in crucem acturum, gaudentes ea dicendi libertate et simplicitati ac ioco imputantes.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one about the joys of summer vacation: Quam felix vita transit sine negotiis (English: How happily life passes by without business to attend to).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is O Cupido, quantus es! (English: O Cupid, how great thou art!). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is one of my own personal favorites: Nocumentum documentum (English: Injury is instruction - in other words, you learn from your mistakes).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is In dubiis abstine (English: In dubious affairs, refrain from doing anything).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Oblivioni tradita est memoria mortuorum (Ecc. 9:5). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Lupus in fabula (English: The wolf in conversation - the Latin equivalent of our saying, "speak of the devil").

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Milone robustior (English: Stronger than Milo - which is to say, stronger than Milo of Croton, who was proverbial for his strength).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Σύντομος ἡ πονηρία, βραδεῖα ἡ ἀρετή (English: Wickedness is a shortcut; virtue goes the long way). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Vespertilio et Feles Duae, the wonderful story of how a bat was able to evade capture by the cats.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Ollae Duae, Alciato's version of the story of the two pots in the stream, and Musca et Currus, the story of the boastful fly. There are also word lists included, courtesy of NoDictionaries.com!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE ET UMBRA (the story of the dog who was fooled by his own reflection in the water). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Pater et Filius, the story of the father who tried - and failed - to rescue his son from his predestined fate.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). I decided to highlight one of my own readers today - an adaptation of the fable of Hercules and the farmer:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, June 22, 2009

Round-Up: June 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 116, which features this perfect proverb for anybody teaching Latin at an all-boys junior high somewhere: Suus cuique crepitus bene olet. (To each his own fart smells nice).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion describes how Caesar spent his time with the pirates: Ita per duodequadraginta dies quasi non captus teneretur ab iis, sed stiparetur, summa securitate collusit ipsis et una exercitationibus vacavit..

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one about the persistent power of water: Longa dies molli saxa peredit aqua (English: The long passage of time eats through rocks by means of soft water).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dulcis inexpertis cultura potentis amici (English: The cultivation of a powerful friend is enjoyable, for those who do not know any better!). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Aspiciendo senescis (English: Watching, you grow older... this is another one of those sundial mottoes, which is why the second-person form is used: these are the words the sundial speaks to us as we watch the shadow move!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Misericordia temperet gladium (English: Let mercy temper the use of the sword - an optimistic use of the subjunctive mood).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Recede a malo et fac bonum; quaere pacem et persequere eam (Psalms 34:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Anguilla a digitis saepe est dilapsa peritis (English: An eel has often escaped from experienced fingers... a saying that you can apply to any situation that gets "out of hand").

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Bene vale, apud Orcum te videbo (English: Farewell, I will see you in hell - with the name of the god Orcus standing in by metonymy for the land of the dead).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸν θέλοντα βοῦν ἔλαυνε (English: Drive the ox who is willing... and, by implication, don't mess with the one who refuses to go). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Leo et Mus, the story of the mouse who foolishly wanted to marry a lion.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets, two per day so that I'll plenty piled up for next summer. Today's elegiac fables are Thunnus et Delphinus, Osius's version of the story of the tuna terrorized by a dolphin, and Milvus Viscera Comedens, Alciato version of the story of the kite whose stomach is aching from someone else's guts.

NoDictionaries.com. Thanks to the availability of the poems of Phaedrus at the NoDictionaries.com site, I'm going through the poems and adjusting the word lists for ambiguous words. Today's fable by Phaedrus is Cervus ad Fontem , the story of the stag with a very confused body image. You can read the poem with word lists at NoDictionaries.com, and also see some additional notes and reading aids at the page for this poem at the Aesopus wiki.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE EQUO ET LEONE (a story of the lion as the "trickster tricked"). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: Inspired by all the great things happening at Tar Heel Reader, I'm publishing my super-simple fables in blog format, too. Today's example of Aesopus Simplicissimus is Taurus et Mus, the story of the bull who was thwarted by a tiny mouse.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). The item I wanted to highlight today is De Triangulis, another one of the mathematical readers contributed by Evan Millner.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, June 21, 2009

Round-Up: June 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem undecimum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 115, which features this saying about life-long learning: Dies diem docet (One day teaches another).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion tells us more about Julius Caesar's fearless attitude towards the pirates, his captors: Deinde suis in diversas urbes ad cogendam pecuniam dimissis, cum inter hominum generis immanissimum Cilicas solus ipse cum uno amico et duobus famulis ageret, ita eos sprevit, ut quoties requieti se dedisset, mitteret qui eos tacere iuberent.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a modern bit of Latin from today, NASA's motto for the Apollo XIII space flight: Ex luna scientia (English: From the moon, knowledge).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Parietes amicitiae custodes (English: Walls are the guardians of friendship). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Pacta servanda (English: Treaties must be kept - one of the principles of international law).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Deus gubernat navem (English: God pilots the ship... and yes, it is from this Latin word for the pilot of a ship, gubernator that we get our English word "governor").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Noli diligere somnum, ne te egestas opprimat (Proverbs 20:13). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Ex vitulo bos fit (English: From the calf comes the ox - which is a fine saying to think of when you see the calves in the fields around this time of year).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Ab ovo Ledae incipit (English: He's starting from Leda's egg - which is to say, telling the story of the Trojan War from the very beginning, when Helen was born from the egg laid by her mother Leda, impregnated by Zeus in the form of a swan).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Δυεῖν ἐπιθυμήσας, οὐδετέρου ἔτυχες (English: Striving after two things, you've ended up with neither - a saying that warns against the dangers of "multitasking"). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Amici et Asinus, the story of two friends who quarreled over a donkey that they found... all to no avail.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets. Today's elegiac fables are Aethiops, from Alciato, and Accipiter et Rusticus, from the anonymous "Trinity Master."

NoDictionaries.com. Thanks to the availability of the poems of Phaedrus at the NoDictionaries.com site, I'm going through the poems and adjusting the word lists for ambiguous words. Today's fable by Phaedrus is Asinus et Leo Venantes, the story of the boastful donkey who went hunting with the lion. You can read the poem with word lists at NoDictionaries.com, and also see some additional notes and reading aids at the page for this poem at the Aesopus wiki.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LUPO ET AGNO (the story of the lamb who had the bad luck to drink from the same stream as the wolf). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Asinus Silvestris, the story of the wild donkey who learned the value of his free and simple life.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). The item I wanted to highlight today is Agricola, Fīlia, Casa, a simple Latin story for beginning students, contributed by Jerry Profitt.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, June 20, 2009

Round-Up: june 20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 114, which features this saying spoken in the voice of Time itself, sometimes found as an inscription on sundials: Maneo nemini (I wait for no one).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion is the beginning of chapter 2, and shows the young Caesar bargaining with the pirates who have captured him: Ab his primum viginti talentis dimissionem redimere iussus, derisit eos, quod nescirent quem cepissent; ultroque daturum se quinquaginta promisit.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a sobering saying about the claims of medicine: Morborum medicus omnium mors ultimus (English: Death is the final physician of all illnesses).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Alienis malis discimus (English: We learn from others' mistakes). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Mercurius supervenit (English: Mercury has arrived - a saying used when conversation suddenly falls silent; according to an ancient superstition, this silence marked the god's arrival).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Curae canitiem inducunt (English: Worrying brings on white hairs... although even the more or less carefree folks, like myself, can go grey!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Crastinus dies sollicitus erit sibi ipse (Matt. 6:34). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Culicem elephanti confert (English: He's comparing a gnat to an elephant - something like mixing apples and oranges, but to a much greater extreme!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Capra Scyria (English: A Scyrian goat - a proverbial saying for someone spiteful, as the goats of the island of Scyros were notorious for kicking over the milk bucket as soon as you finished milking them).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄλλο γλαῦξ, ἄλλο κορώνη φθέγγεται (English: An owl has one voice, and a crow has another voice - I'm not very good at recognizing bird calls, but even I can tell the difference between an owl hooting and a crow cawing!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Lupus et Grus, the story of the crane who foolishly did a favor for the wolf.

Aesopus Elegiacus: For my next book project, I'm collecting Aesop's fables told in the form of elegiac couplets. Today's elegiac fable is Taurus et Mus, the story of the big bull and the tiny mouse.

NoDictionaries.com. Thanks to the availability of the poems of Phaedrus at the NoDictionaries.com site, I'm going through the poems and adjusting the word lists for ambiguous words. Today's fable by Phaedrus is Lupus et Vulpis Iudice Simio , the story of the wolf and the fox on trial, with the monkey as judge. You can read the poem with word lists at NoDictionaries.com, and also see some additional notes and reading aids at the page for this poem at the Aesopus wiki.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE TUBICINE CAPTIVO (the story of the trumpeter captured in war). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: Inspired by all the great things happening at Tar Heel Reader, I'm publishing my super-simple fables in blog format, too. Today's example of Aesopus Simplicissimus is Rusticus et Hercules, the wonderful story of how Hercules the god helps those that help themselves.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). The item I wanted to highlight today is Cogito Ergo Sum, an exploration of Latin verb tenses using this famous statement by Descartes:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, June 19, 2009

Round-Up: June 19

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Iulias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 113, which features this saying about how the gods can creep up on us unknowingly: Di lanatos pedes habent (The gods have feet wrapped in wool).

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. In today's Latin portion, young Julius is captured by pirates! Neque diu apud eum commoratus cum inde aveheretur, apud Pharmacusam insulam a piratis captus est iam tum magnis classibus et innumeris navigiis mare obtinentibus.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one about bittersweet love: Principium dulce est, sed finis amoris amarus (English: The beginning is sweet, but the end of love is bitter).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Induis me leonis exuvium (English: You are dressing me in a lion's skin). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Sapiens, sile (English: Being wise, be silent! - another one of those many sayings in praise of the strategy of keeping quiet).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Suo malo sapit. (English: He learns at his own cost - that is, a saying about someone who learns from their mistakes and from the bad things that happen to them, becoming wise after the fact).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Propter frigus piger arare noluit; mendicabit ergo aestate (Proverbs 20:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Aquila non generat columbam (English: An eagle doesn't breed a dove - a saying you can find in my Tar Heel Reader, Proverbia de Aquila).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Cyclopum more (English: As the Cyclops do... which is to say, in a primitive or uncivilized way - as exemplified by the most famous of the Cyclopses, Homer's Polyphemus).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Μῦς δακὼν παῖδ᾽ ἀπέφυγε (English: The mouse bit a boy and ran away - a saying that reminds me of the Aesop's fable which I was working on today, about the mouse who bit a bull and lived to boast about it!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Based on the good response I've gotten to the use of accent marks at Tar Heel Reader, I'm collecting fables now with macrons AND accent marks in this blog. Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Mures et Tintinnabulum, the story of the mice debating about just who will "bell the cat."

NoDictionaries.com. Thanks to the availability of the poems of Phaedrus at the NoDictionaries.com site, I'm going through the poems and adjusting the word lists for ambiguous words. Today's fable by Phaedrus is Passer ad Leporem, a delightful and little-known fable about the sparrow who cruelly made fun of a rabbit who has been caught by an eagle. You can read the poem with word lists at NoDictionaries.com, and also see some additional notes and reading aids at the page for this poem at the Aesopus wiki.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE SINE CAUDA (a story of vanity and how misery loves company). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Cane ad cenam eunte, the story of the boastful dog and the banquet.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). The item I wanted to highlight today is Poeta et Milites, the story of the soldiers who tell their stories to the poet, contributed by Karen Budde:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.