Thursday, May 28, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

I was doing some work for my Indian Epics class, and I wrote a little javascript to make it easy to see the Blogger mobile version of the blog, which is better for printing, saving as a PDF, etc. You'll see the mobile-version button over in the top right sidebar of the blog. My students had asked for something like this, and I thought it might be useful to any of you who print the blog posts here.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Selene and Endymion; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Quam plurimis prodesse (English: To help as many as possible).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Occasio facit furem (English: Opportunity makes the thief).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: O bona fortuna, cur non es omnibus una? (English: O Good Luck, why are you not one and the same to everyone?).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nonne anima plus est quam esca? (Matt. 6:25). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sero sapiunt Phryges: The Troyans are wise to late. When the saege of Troy had endured for the space of ten yeares, then at last the Troyans which now had suffred innumerable mischiefes, began to take counsaile, whether it were best to send home againe faire Helene, the occasion of al their miserie. But when theyr countrey was now with continual warres wasted and destroyed, it was to late to be wise. Even so it is of manie at this day, They be wise, but to late.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Res Male Parta. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Esto tua sorte contentus.
Be content with your lot in life.

Frangit fortia corda dolor.
Grief shatters strong hearts.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes Duo et Os, a story about two foolish dogs and one that was wiser (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mors et Cupido, a story about a cosmic mix-up!

Cupido et Mors

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἄγγελος γὰρ ἀγαθὸς συμπορεύσεται αὐτῷ. Angelus Dei bonus comitetur ei. For the good angel will keep him company.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 26

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

I was really excited about something that happened this week: my Myth-Folklore UnTextbook got a nice write-up at SecularHomeschool.com. One of the reasons I put my materials online is because I hope they can be useful to others, and I was very happy that Kerry Jones thought the Myth-Folklore UnTextbook that I made for my class could have a more general use. :-)

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Flight of Aeneas; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Carpe diem (English: Seize the day).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ex flamma lux (English: From the flame, light).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Noli irritare leones (English: Don't bother the lions).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Lupum auribus teneo (English: I've got the wolf by the ears — it's dangerous to hold on, and it's dangerous to let go).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Iovis sandalium (English: Jupiter's sandal; from Adagia 2.7.76 — This was a proverbial expression for some paltry object that claimed to be associated with a celebrity).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἔνεστι κἂν μύρμηκι χολή (English: Even the ant has its bile).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vir Bonus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Maiori cede, sed non contemne minorem!
Yield to the greater, but scorn not the lesser!

Domus divisa contra se non stabit.
A house divided against itself will not stand.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vultures, Leo, et Aper, a story about vultures who take advantage of others' quarrels.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mustela et Lima, the story of a bloodthirsty weasel (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Mustela et Lima

Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: TEMPUS FUGIT AUGEBITUR SCIENTIA.

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Andromache and Hector; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Conanti dabitur (English: To the one who strives, it will be given).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Suum cuique pulchrum (English: To each his own is beautiful).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Athanasius contra mundum (English: Athanasius against the world). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Velox consilium sequitur paenitentia (English: A hasty plan results in regret).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Habet et musca splenem (English: Even the fly has its spleen; from Adagia 3.5.7).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Quanto Dignior. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Timendi causa est nescire.
Ignorance is the cause of fear.

Odium numquam potest esse bonum.
Hatred can never be a good thing.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Alata, the story of an ant who had the misfortune of getting what she asked for (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Avara et Gallina, a fable of unintended consequences.

Mulier et Gallina Obesa

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leaena et Sus, with links to the audio and to the blog post.