Friday, June 22, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 22

I'm really scrambling this summer to manage the demands of life at the moment, but here's a blog post for this week, and I've been working away on my Chain Tales project too if you are interested in some folklore fun.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem decimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Achilles and Chiron, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Virtus propter se (English: Excellence for its own sake).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Non dentes cernas, si detur equus, neque spernas (English: If someone gives you a horse, don't look at its teeth, and don't turn it away -- in other words: don't look a gift-horse in the mouth).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cum mortuis non nisi larvae luctantur (English: None but ghosts wrestle with the dead).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἁ δὴ χεὶρ την χεῖρα νίζει (English: One hand washes the other).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sapiens Desipiens . Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Honos habet onus.
Public office is a burden.

Somnum ne rumpe leoni.
Disturb not the lion's sleep.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Panthera et pastores, a story about consequences: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De lupo et haedo, a story about a kid home alone: Latin text and English versions.


Thursday, June 7, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 7

Back after another hiatus, and for the indefinite future my posts will be off-and-on here -- although I have been managing to keep up with my Chain-Tale summer project for anyone with an interest in that line of folklore: Chain Tales. (Today's story was from Russia, with the Russian text for any Slavophiles among us.)

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Idus Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Triptolemus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Audax ero (English: I will be bold).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Libri muti magistri (English: Books are silent teachers)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Sine labore non erit panis in ore (English: Without work there will be no bread in your mouth). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Canis in praesepi (English: The dog in the manger ... who notoriously will not let other animals eat the hay, even though the dog himself is not going to eat it; from Adagia 1.10.13).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Quod Videri Vis, Esto. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Mente manuque.
By thought and hand.

Abundans cautela non nocet.
Extreme caution does no harm.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Anus ad amphoram, a story about the sweet memories: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De leporibus et ranis, a story about fear: Latin text and English versions.




Sunday, May 20, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 20

I took a little time off while getting started on my summer project. It's not Latin-related... but it is folklore-related, so perhaps of interest: it's a collection of chain-tales! I'm not sure where exactly this will end up, but I have had a lot of fun getting started.


HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Birth of Apollo and Artemis, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Disce docendo (English: Learn by teaching).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Occasio aegre offertur, facile amittitur (English: Opportunity is hard to grab, easy to lose).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Magis sibi placet, quam Peleus in machaera (English: He is more pleased with himself than Peleus with his sword; from Adagia 2.8.26... The gods had bestowed on Peleus a marvelous sword forged by Vulcan himself).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Crocodili lacrimae: Crocodiles teares. A proverbe applied unto them which hating an other man, whom they woulde destroye or have destroyed, they will seme to be sorye for hem. It ys taken of the propertie of Crocodilus the monstre, who beholding a man comming whom he would devoure weepeth, and after he hath eaten the bodye, he washeth the head with his teares and then eateth it also.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Numina Vana. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



In libris libertas.
In books there is freedom.

Post tenebras spero lucem.
After the darkness, I hope for light.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Cervus ad boves, a story about being observant: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De cane antiquo et eius domino, a story about a bad boss: Latin text and English versions.