Saturday, August 11, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 11

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Idus Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Psyche Awakening Cupid, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Beati pacifici (English: Blessed are the peace-makers).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Iniuriarum remedium est oblivio (English: The remedy for injuries you've suffered is to forget about them).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Adonidis horti (English: The gardens of Adonis; from Adagia 1.1.4; you can read about the Gardens of Adonis at Wikipedia). Here's a painting of the Gardens of Adonis by John Reinhard Weguelin:


ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Currus bovem trahit: Ye set the cart before the horse. This Proverbe hath place in thinges done preposteriously, cleane contrarilye, and arsy versy as they say. As for exemple, if a wife would rule her husbande, if the scolar woulde teache his maister, if the commons would tel theyr Prince what he had to do, finallie if the affection or sensualite would guide reason, as alake for pitie in these cases, and in many other more, it is oft seene.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Viribus Iungenda Sapientia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Diversis diversa placent, et sua gaudia cuique. 
 Different people like different things,
and each person has their own pleasures.

Si vis pacem, para bellum.
If you want peace, be ready for war.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Musca et mula, a story about who holds the whip: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De calvo et musca, another fable about a bold fly: Latin text and English versions.


Sunday, August 5, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 5

The summer ran away form me (lots of family stuff going on), but school is about to start for me again this month, and I'll try to make this blog part of my regular school routine. Thanks to Legionum @tutubuslatinus for getting me up and running again! (More about that here.)

And here's something fun from tutubuslatinus at Twitter:


HODIE (Roman Calendar): Nonae Augustae, the Nones of August!

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Labyrinth, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Meliora spero sequorque (English: I hope for and pursue better things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Stet fortuna domus (English: May this house be fortunate). Here is a 1935 Official Silver Jubilee Medallion for George V:


RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Mortis linque metus, si tu vis vivere laetus (English: Put aside any fears of death, if you want to live happily).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nemo propheta acceptus est in patria sua (Luke 4:24). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sapientia Mentis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Sola caritas non peccat.
Love alone does not sin.

Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscere potum.
Drink the whole glass, if you want to know the drink.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Aesopus et petulans, a story about how dangerous the trickster Aesop could be: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De cervo, ove et lupo, a story about injustice: Latin text and English versions.




Friday, June 22, 2018

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 22

I'm really scrambling this summer to manage the demands of life at the moment, but here's a blog post for this week, and I've been working away on my Chain Tales project too if you are interested in some folklore fun.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem decimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Achilles and Chiron, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Virtus propter se (English: Excellence for its own sake).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Non dentes cernas, si detur equus, neque spernas (English: If someone gives you a horse, don't look at its teeth, and don't turn it away -- in other words: don't look a gift-horse in the mouth).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cum mortuis non nisi larvae luctantur (English: None but ghosts wrestle with the dead).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἁ δὴ χεὶρ την χεῖρα νίζει (English: One hand washes the other).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sapiens Desipiens . Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Honos habet onus.
Public office is a burden.

Somnum ne rumpe leoni.
Disturb not the lion's sleep.

TODAY'S FABLES:

PHAEDRI FABULAE: The illustrated fable from Phaedrus for today is Panthera et pastores, a story about consequences: Latin text and Smart's translation.


STEINHOWEL: The illustrated fable from Steinhowel for today is De lupo et haedo, a story about a kid home alone: Latin text and English versions.