Sunday, June 26, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: Sunday, June 26

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board. I've recently started a Board for the Distich Poems.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Polyxena and Troilus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Intellegenti pauca (English: For one who understands, a few words will do).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is In dubiis constans (English: In doubtful matters, steadfast).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Mus debacchatur ubi cattus non dominatur (English: The mouse parties when the cat is not in charge).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nolite solliciti esse in crastinum (English: Don't worry about tomorrow).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Tithoni senecta. (English: The old age of Tithonus; from Adagia 1.6.65; you can read about Tithonus, the human lover of Eos, goddess of dawn, at Wikipedia).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἁ δὴ χεὶρ την χεῖρα νίζει (English: One hand washes the other).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Deum Non Amat Qui Odit Proximum. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Tu dormis et tempus ambulat.
You are sleeping and time walks on.

Non parvum est seipsum noscere.
It is no small thing to know oneself.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Calvus et Crines Alieni, a story about a bald man and his wig.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mors et Senex, a story about being in a state of denial (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀφέωνται αἱ ἁμαρτίαι αὐτῆς αἱ πολλαί, ὅτι ἠγάπησεν πολύ. Remittuntur ei peccata multa, quoniam dilexit multum. Her sins, which are many, are forgiven for she loved much.


Thursday, June 23, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Perseus and Andromeda; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Resurgam (English: I shall rise again).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Fames optimum condimentum (English: Hunger is the best seasoning)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Longae regum manus (English: Long are the hands of kings). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Nil proprium ducas, quidquid mutari potest (English: Do not consider anything to be your own if it can change).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mus non ingrediens antrum, cucurbitam ferebat (English: The mouse couldn't get into its hole because it was carrying a pumpkin; from Adagia 3.3.79).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vae Soli. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nil timeo.
I fear nothing.

Discat qui nescit; discendo sapientia crescit.
Let him learn who does not know; by learning wisdom grows.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Gallus et Ancillae, a story of unintended consequences (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vitis et Hircus, a fable about greed ... and karma.

Hircus et Vitis

Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: UMBRA TRANSIT, LUX MANET.


Monday, June 20, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and Eurycleia; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is In tempestate floresco (English: I flourish in the storm).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Veritas vos liberabit (English: The truth will set you free).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Qui nimium fatur, stultissimus esse probatur (English: He who speaks too much proves himself to be an utter fool).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Crastinus dies sollicitus erit sibi ipse (Matt. 6:34). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Non semper erit aestas: It will not alweyes be sommer, take tyme when tyme cometh, for occasion will not alwey serve, when the iron ys whote we must strike, least hit be colde agayne.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Precare Mihi. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Natura diverso gaudet.
Nature rejoices in variety.

Nemo sine crimine vivit.
No one lives without doing wrong.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Agnus et Lupus, Bibentes, a fable about how might makes right.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Membra et Venter, a story about "corporation" (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Membra et Venter

Evan Millner's Fables. I thought you might enjoy Evan Millner's marvelous fable videos; they are available at YouTube.