Saturday, December 20, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Seven Against Thebes; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Irrideo tempestatem (English: I scoff at the storm).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Nihil diu occultum (English: Nothing remains long hidden).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas (English: The censor forgives the crows and harasses the doves). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quod est venturum, sapiens ut praesens cavet (English: The wise man guards against what is to come as if it were already here).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mortuo leoni et lepores insultant (English: Even rabbits insult the dead lion; from Adagia 4.7.82).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tu Mihi Omnia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Veneris quis gaudia nescit?
Who knows not the joys of Venus?

Vita sine litteris mors est.
Life without literature is death.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Monedula Liberata , a sad story of unexpected consequences (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mulus et Equus, a story in praise of the simple life.

Equus Superbus et Asinus

TODAY'S LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS

The Latin holiday songs for today are: Gaudium Mundo, along with Deus paret, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Bóg się rodzi" and also Prope accedamus, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Przystąpmy do szopy." You can find more at the Gaudium Mundo blog.



Thursday, December 18, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 18

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for more fables to read (LOTS more fables), you can download a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ajax and Cassandra; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Certa bonum certamen (English: Fight the good fight).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Amor tollit timorem (English: Love removes fear).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Saepe etiam stultus fuit opportuna locutus (English: Often even the fool has said something to the point).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Non in pane solo vivet homo (Matt. 4:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Iustitia in se virtutem complectitur omnem: Justice compriseth in it al vertue. He that is a perfect righteous or iust man, without question lacketh no vertue.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Mortis Metus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Vive in diem.
Live for the day.

Volens et valens
Willing and able.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Accipiter Columbam Insequens, a story of bird karma (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Nux Secundum Viam Sata, a story of environmental ingratitude.

Nux (1550)

TODAY'S LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS

The Latin holiday songs for today are: Heu! quid jaces stabulo, a 15th-century hymn, and also Heri nocte prima, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "A wczoraj z wieczora." You can find more at the Gaudium Mundo blog.



Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Scylla; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Pulsanti aperietur (English: It will be opened to the one who knocks).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Libertas pretiosior auro (English: Freedom is more precious than gold).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Inter simios oportet esse simium (English: Among monkeys, you need to be a monkey).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Iacta super dominum curam tuam, et ipse te enutriet (English: Cast your worries upon the Lord and he will nourish you).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Nunc pluit, et claro nunc Iuppiter aethere fulget (English: Now Jupiter rains, and now he shines forth from the clear sky; from Adagia 1.8.65 - in Latin, "Jupiter," as the god of the sky, was also a weather god).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἡ κάμηλος ἐπιθυμήσασα κεράτων, καὶ τὰ ὦτα προσαπώλεσεν (English: The camel desired horns, but she lost her ears into the bargain, as the Aesop's fable tells us).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Mors Non Timenda. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Omnes filii Dei estis.
You are all children of God.

Igne quid utilius?
What is more useful than fire?

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Equus Circensis Molae Iugatus, the sad story of a racehorse fallen on hard times (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ursus et Amici Duo, the story of a bear and two friends, one true and one false.

Ursus et Amici Duo

TODAY'S LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS

The Latin holiday songs for today are: O Hanukkah, a Latin version of "The Hanukkah Song," in honor of the beginning of Hanukkah at sundown tonight, along with Lapsi Caelo Super Gentes, a Latin version of "Angels We Have Heard on High," and the hymns Jesu, dulcis memoria and Gloria in Excelsis Deo. You can find more at the Gaudium Mundo blog.