Sunday, July 24, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas and the Omen of the Sow; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Ostendo, non ostento (English: I show; I do not boast).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Sapientia omnia operatur (English: Wisdom works all things).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Est piger agnellus, qui non gestat sibi vellus (English: The little lamb who doesn't want to carrry his own wool is lazy).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Quaerite et invenietis (Matt. 7:7)). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Quo semel est imbuta recens servabit odorem testa diu: A vessel will kepe long the savour wherewith it is firste seasoned. For this cause Quintilian counsailet us forth with even from our youth to learne the best thinges, sith nothing sticketh more fastly than that, that is received and taken of pure youth not yet infected, with perverse and croked manners or opinions. For verelie full true is our Englishe Proverbe, That is bread by the bone wil never away.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ad Ponticum. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Fortis cadere, cedere non potest.
The brave man can fall but not fail.

Cave canem!
Beware of dog!

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canis Vetulus et Magister, the sad story of a dog and his ungrateful master (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Struthiocamelus Perfidus, the story of an unreliable ostrich.

Struthiocamelus Perfidus

Words from Mythology. For more about DRACO and the English word DRACONIAN, see this blog post.


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board. I've recently started a Board for the Distich Poems.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Diogenes Casting away his Cup; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Aedificate alterutrum! (English: Sustain one another!).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Nunc et semper (English: Now and always).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Ex ovis pravis non bona venit avis (English: From bad eggs no good bird comes).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: In domo patris mei, mansiones multae sunt (English: In my father's house, there are many mansions).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ne e quovis ligno Mercurius fiat (English: You can't make a statue of Mercury out of just any block of wood; from Adagia 2.5.47).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἡ κύων ἐν φάτνῃ (English: the proverbial "dog in the manger").

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Roma-Amor. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Beneficium beneficio responde.
Repay one favor with another.

Diem nox premit, dies noctem.
Night presses upon day, day night.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Alauda, Pulli, et Agri Dominus, a fable about procrastination.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus et Viatores Duo, a funny story about a foolish quarrel (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Asinus Controversus

And here is another lovely item from the Enzo Proverb Project! The only thing cuter than Latin cats has to be this beautiful Latin baby: Si vis amari, ama.


Sunday, July 17, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Daedalus and Icarus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Audentior ibo (English: I will go more boldly).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Silentium stultorum virtus (English: Silence is the fools' virtue).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Asinus stramen mavult quam aurum (English: A donkey prefers straw to gold). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Furor fit laesa saepius patientia (English: Patience wounded once too often becomes rage).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Semper graculus adsidet graculo (English: One jackdaw always sits next to another; from Adagia 1.2.23... birds of a feather flock together).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Homerus. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Vult et non vult piger.
The lazy man wants and doesn't want.

Irritare canem noli dormire volentem.
Do not disturb a dog who wants to sleep.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus et Grammaticus, the story of a sneaky schoolteacher (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vultur Convivium Faciens, the grim story of the vulture's birthday party.

vultur et aves

Freebookapalooza. I've been updating the free Classics books fro my Myth-Folklore class, and I thought you might enjoy seeing the list so far: free Classics books online.