Friday, February 20, 2015

Hiatus Brevis

The blog will be on hiatus for a few days, but I'll be back! Meanwhile, you can browse the archives at the blog for Latin amusements: Bestiaria Latina.

Thursday, February 19, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: February 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem undecimum Kalendas Martias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Zeus and Amalthea; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Grata quies (English: Repose is welcome).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Iniuriarum remedium oblivio (English: The remedy for injuries you've suffered is to forget about them).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Errores medicorum terra tegit (English: The earth covers the doctors' mistakes). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Brevis ipsa vita est, sed malis fit longior (English: Life itself is short, but it becomes longer through suffering).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Piscis primum a capite foetet (English: The fish starts to stink from the head; from Adagia 4.2.97 - the idea being that organizations also start to stink with corruption from the top).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ad Amorem. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Iratum noli stimulare.
Do not provoke someone who is angry.

Malo me diligi quam metui.
I prefer to be loved rather than feared.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo et Homo, Concertantes, a wonderful story about art and life.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Iuppiter et Serpens, the story of a snake and its unwelcome gift (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes, Corvus et Gallus, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

0113 De vulpe et corvo

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: February 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free PDF copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: #PDF Tribute to Aaron Swartz

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Martias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Hylas and the Nymphs; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Malum bono vince (English: Conquer evil with good).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Etiam prudentissimus peccat (English: Even the most prudent man makes mistakes).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Multa facit dira, si non compescitur ira (English: Anger can do many terrible things, if it is not held in check).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Vos estis lux mundi (Matt. 5:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Homo bulla: A proverbe notinge the frayltie of mannes life which vanisheth awaye like a bubble of water..

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fert Omnia Secum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



In libris libertas.
In books there is freedom.

Dulcior est fructus post multa pericula ductus.
Sweeter is the fruit obtained after many dangers.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Asini Spongiis et Sale Onusti, the story of a donkey who is too smart for his own good.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Feles et Venus, the wonderful story of what happened when Venus changed a cat into a woman (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Feles et Venus

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes et Avis Terraneola, with links to the audio and to the blog post.