Saturday, November 1, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 1

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Kalendae Novembres, the Calends of November.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and the Sirens; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Vincit labor (English: Hard work is victorious).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Ad Graecas calendas (English: On the Greek calends - which is to say "never," since the Greeks did not have a day called the calends as the Romans did).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is In idem flumen bis non descendimus (English: We do not go down into the same river twice). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quam miserum est, cum se renovat consumptum malum (English: How wretched it is when a problem which had run its course comes back!).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mus non uni fidit antro (English: A mouse cannot entrust itself to just one hole; from Adagia 5.1.4).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Pro Patria Cara. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Lege totum si vis scire totum
Read it all if you wish to know it all.

Cum audace non eas in via.
Do not travel with a bold companion.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Cervus et Hinnulus Eius, a story about inward and outward power (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Struthiocamelus et Gallina, the story of the ostrich who wanted to fly.

Struthiocamelus Volans

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo et Equus, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Equus et Leo Medicus

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 30

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for more fables to read (LOTS more fables), you can download a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Orpheus and the Animals; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Timor omnis abesto (English: Away with all fear).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Actum ne agas (English: Don't do something that's been done).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Omnia transibunt! Sic ibimus, ibitis, ibunt (English: All things will pass away! So we will go, you will go, they will go).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Tu quid iudicas fratrem tuum? (Romans 14:10). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit: No man in the world is wise at al houres. It is only belonging to God and properly due unto him never to commit follie. There is, I say, no man, but otherwiles doteth, but is deceived, but plaieth the foole, though he seme never so wise. Whan I say man, I except not the woman.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Quod Natura Rogat. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Cum audace non eas in via.

Do not travel with a bold companion.

Amore, more, ore, re iunguntur amicitiae.

Friendships are connected
by love (amore), by habit (more),
by speech (ore) and by action (re).

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus et Canis Saginatus, a story about the value of freedom.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pirata et Alexander Rex, the story of Alexander the Great and a witty pirate (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo, Lepus, et Cerva, with links to the audio and to the blog post.


Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. By a funny coincidence, three different people wrote this weekend asking for English to go with the LOLCats. I'm not keen on doing the English, but since it is already there at the Proverb Lab (where the cats live), I'll be copying that under the cats. I hope people will still give the Latin a try before looking! :-)

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Atalanta and the Boar; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Pelle timorem (English: Drive out fear).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post nubila Phoebus (English: After the clouds, the sun).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Avis matura vermem capit (English: The bird who hastens catches the worm).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nihil invita Minerva facies (English: You will not accomplish anything if Minerva is unwilling - that is, without the blessing of wisdom).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ne Iupiter quidem omnibus placet (English: Not even Jupiter can please everybody; from Adagia 2.7.55).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀυτοῦ Ῥόδος, αὐτοῦ καὶ τὸ πήδημα (English: Let this be Rhodes, and let this also be your leap - from Aesop's fable of the boasting athlete).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Parum Habere Cum Honore. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ad astra doloribus itur.
By means of suffering, you reach the stars.

Multa docet fames.
Hunger teaches many things.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Luna et Mater, the story of the ever-changing moon and her mother.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pavo et Iuno, the story of the unhappy peacock's petition to Hera (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Pavo et Iuno

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo et Tauri Duo, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Leo et Tauri - Osius