Monday, May 2, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Nonas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Cacus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Parum sufficit (English: A little bit is enough).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post spinas palma (English: After thorns, the palm = the palm of victory).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Echinus partum procrastinat (English: The hedgehog delays giving birth... but the little ones are more and more pricklier the longer she waits).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Non nobis solum nati sumus (English: We are not born for ourselves alone).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Cave Thoracem (English: Beware of Mount Thorax; from Adagia 2.4.52 - this refers to Mount Thorax, where the notoriously rude poet Daphitas was supposedly crucified for having written some poetry mocking the kings).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Τοῖς σεαυτοῦ πτεροῖς ἥλως (English: You're caught by your own feathers, as illustrated in this Aesop's fable about the eagle and the arrow).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vita Felix. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nulli iniuria facienda.
Do wrong to no one.

Decus in labore.
There is dignity in work.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Leo et Tauri Duo, a story of divide-and-conquer (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ranae Duae Vicinae, a fable about two different frog lifestyles.

Ranae Duae Vicinae

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo et Vulpes, Socii, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Vulpes et Leo (de Familiaritate)

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Penelope, Laertes and Telemachus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper liber (English: Always free).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Littera custos historiae (English: Writing is the guardian of history).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Est unusquisque faber ipsae suae fortunae (English: Each and every person is the maker of his own luck). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Stultum est queri de adversis, ubi culpa est tua (English: It's stupid to complain about difficulties when the fault is yours).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Camelus desiderans cornua, etiam aures perdidit (English: Hoping for horns, the camel lost its ears, too; from Adagia 3.5.8, alluding to the famous Aesop's fable).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Domus Propria. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Gratia referenda. 
 A favor should be returned.

Ubi pericula, ibi gloria.
Where danger, there glory.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Piscatores et Lapis Ingens, a story about life's ups and downs.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pirata et Alexander Rex, a story about pirates big and small (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Growth Mindset Memes. For more about this growth cat, see this blog post. Nosce te ipsum. Know yourself.


Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 26

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free PDF copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: #PDF Tribute to Aaron Swartz

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Nessus and Deianeira; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Non ducor, duco (English: I am not led; I lead).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Labore omnia florent (English: With hard work, all things flourish).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Te modicum iacta, quoniam probat exitus acta (English: Keep your boasting within limits, since it is the outcome which commends your deeds).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Unusquisque in arte sua sapiens est (Sirach 38:31). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Omnia idem pulvis: Al is one self dust or asshes. From earth wee came, and to earth wee shall. Yea the scripture saith that asshes wee be, and to asshes we shall reverte. Nowe amongest asshes or dust I pray you, what greate difference is ther? How will ye discerne the asshes of a Kinge, or an Emperour, of a Duke, of a great Bishop, from the asshes of a cobler, yea of a begger. .

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Omnia Mea Mecum Porto. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Vino tempera.
Keep your drinking under control.

Vulpinatur cum vulpe.
Play the fox with the fox.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Olor et Anseres, a fable about the swan song.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus Leonis Pelle Indutus, the famous story of the donkey in the lion-skin (this fable has a vocabulary list).


GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἀρχὴ ἥμισυ παντός. Principium dimidium totius. To start is half of the whole.