Saturday, August 27, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Kalendas Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Phaethon, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Dum vivo, spero (English: So long as I live, I hope).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nummus nummum parit (English: Money makes money).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ostia cur claudis, si vocem pauperis audis? (English: Why do you close the door if you hear the voice of a poor man?).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Moritur doctus, similiter et indoctus (Ecc. 2:16). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Taurum tollet, qui vitulum sustulerit: He that hath borne a calfe, that also beare a bull, he that accustomed him selfe to litle thinges, by litle and litle shal be able to goe awaye with greater thinges. One named Milo, was wont every day to beare a certaine way on his shoulders a calf. At length the calfe grew to a great oxe, his daily exercise made him still able to beare the oxe, when the oxe was now of an exceding great quantitie, ye see what maistries use worketh.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Lingua Una, Aures Duae . Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Quod scripsi, scripsi.
What I have written, I have written.

Audentior ibo.
I will go forth more boldly.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus et Persona Tragoedi, a story about pretty faces.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Ranae et Iuppiter, a fable with profound relevance to politics of the moment (this fable has a vocabulary list).

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Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Children of the Dawn: Old Tales of Greece by Elsie Finnimore Buckley with illustrations by Frank C. Pape.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board. I've recently started a Board for the Distich Poems too.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Dionysus and the Dolphins, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Errando discitur (English: Learning comes from making mistakes).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ex unitate incrementum (English: From unity, increase).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Ex frixis ovis pullus numquam venit ullus (English: From fried eggs no chick ever comes).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Medice, cura teipsum (English: Physician, heal yourself).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Dente Theonino rodi (English: To be gnawed by Theon's tooth; from Adagia 2.2.55 ... Theon was a grammarian at Rome who was notoriously mean-spirited and critical).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἁμαρτεῖν οὐκ ἔνεστι δὶς ἐν πολέμῳ (English: You cannot err twice in war).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Lingua Docet Quid Lateat. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Qualis mater, talis et filia.
Like mother, like daughter also.

Beatus ille homo qui vivit sua domo.
Blessed is he who lives in his own home.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Satyrus et Viator: is the satyr wise or foolish...? You decide! (This fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Astrologus Stellas Contemplans, a fable about perspective.

Astrologus

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀπὸ τῶν παιδίων τῶν Εβραίων τοῦτο. De infantibus Hebraeorum est hic. This is one of the Hebrews' children.


Sunday, August 21, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ino and Melicertes, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Fiat iustitia (English: Let there be justice).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Pecunia nervus belli (English: Money is the sinew of war)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Iucunda poma, si procul custodia (English: Fruits are sweet if the guard is far away). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: O tacitum tormentum animi conscientia! (English: O conscience, the silent torment of the soul!).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Cyprio bovi merenda (English: A meal fit for a Cyprian bull; from Adagia 1.10.96... The bulls of Cyprus were notorious for eating manure).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Vos Qui Docetis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Eamus quo ducit fortuna.
Let's go where luck leads us.

Egomet sum mihi imperator.
I am my own boss.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Delphinus et Pisciculus, a story about a not-nice dolphin.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Iuppiter et Serpens, a story about an unwelcome gift (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: DUM SPECTAS FUGIO