Saturday, July 4, 2015

Special Edition: July 4

For today's special edition, I decided to select some Latin sayings about liberty, along with some cats who know the value of being free, not slaves.


Libertas optima rerum.
Freedom is the best thing.



Sine iustitia nulla libertas.
Without justice there is no freedom.



Fac sapias et liber eris.
Get wise and you will be free.



In libertate labor.
In freedom, there is work.



Nemo nisi sapiens liber est.
No one, unless he is wise, is free.



Vigilia pretium libertatis.
Vigilance is the price of freedom.



Nemo liber est qui corpori servit.
No one is free who is a slave to the body.



O nomen dulce libertatis!
O sweet name of liberty!



Ubi libertas, ibi patria.
Where I am free, there is my homeland.



Quam dulcis libertas!
How sweet freedom is!



In libris libertas.
In books there is freedom.



Nolite fieri servi hominum.
Become not servants of men.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Nonas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ino and Melicertes; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Amor aedificat (English: Love builds up).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Repetitio mater memoriae (English: Repetition is the mother of memory).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Canis in praesepi (English: The dog in the manger). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Virtutis omnis impedimentum est timor (English: Fear is an obstacle to every virtue).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Lupus in fabula (English: Speak of the wolf; from Adagia 3.8.56 - which is the Latin equivalent of our "Speak of the devil" ... and he appears).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Intentus in Unum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Altius tendo.
I strive to go higher.

Cavendo tutus.
By being cautious, safe.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canis et Bos, the famous story of the dog in the manger which showed up in a proverb today too (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Pisces, Magni et Minuti, a story about why "small is beautiful."

Pisces Magni et Minuti

Amy Burvall's History for Music Lovers. Here is today's video: Greek Philosophers, which you can watch at YouTube also.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 29

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

As I mentioned in the previous post, I've started a Growth Mindset Memes project, and it's going to be a lot of fun. Susan Strickland has already created her own Cheezburger Board, which includes this lovely item!


HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Trojan Horse; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Occasio capienda est (English: Seize the opportunity).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Persevera per severa (English: Persevere through severities).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Cras, cras, cras, cras: sic omnis dilabitur aetas (English: Tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow: so a whole lifetime slips by).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Littera occidit; Spiritus autem vivificat (II Cor. 3:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Suo ipsius indicio periit sorex: The Ratte betrayed herself with her owne noyse and so was taken. It is a proverbiall speakinge of anybodye that ys betrayed by his owne wordes..

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Mentes Diversae. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Mens alitur discendo et cogitando.
The mind is nourished by learning and thinking.

Sic fuit, est, et erit: similis similem sibi quaerit.
Thus it was, is, and will be: like seeks like.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Haedus et Lupus Fores Pulsans, a "home alone" type of fable (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpes et Catus, a story in which the fox is too smart for her own good.

vulpes et feles

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἀσφαλέστερον γὰρ τοῦ λέγειν τὸ σιγᾶν. Tutius est tacere quam loqui. It is safer to keep quiet than to speak.