Sunday, April 26, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 26

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Polyxena at the Well; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Medium certum (English: The middle way is reliable).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ars gratia artis (English: Art for art's sake).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Horrescit gelidas felis adustus aquas (English: The cat once burnt shudders at cold water).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Festucam in alterius oculo vides, in tuo trabem non vides (English: You see a bit of straw in another's eye, but you do not see the log in your eye).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ad Graecas calendas (English: On the Greek calends; from Adagia 1.5.84 - which is to say, never: the Roman calendar had "Calends" on the first of each month, but the Greek calendar did not).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ὀυδὲ Ἡρακλῆς πρὸς δύο (English: Not even Hercules challenges two at once).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Amicus Inimicus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Claude os, aperi oculos.
Close your mouth; open your eyes.

Pax optima rerum.
Peace is the best thing of all.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Olor et Anseres, a story about the swan and its famous song.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus Leonis Pelle Indutus, the famous story of the donkey in the lion's skin (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: SOLI DEO GLORIA.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem octavum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Judgment of Paris; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Cavendo (English: By being careful).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Longae regum manus (English: Long are the hands of kings).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Morborum medicus omnium mors ultimus (English: The last doctor of every disease is death). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Stultum est queri de adversis, ubi culpa est tua (English: It's stupid to complain about difficulties when the fault is yours).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Bestia bestiam novit (English: One beast knows another; from Adagia 4.7.57).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Amicus ut Non Alius, Inimicus ut Non Idem. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Numquam satis discitur.
There is never enough learning.

Omnia Fortunae committo.
I entrust all things to Luck.

TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Apes, Fur, et Mellarius, a story about the bees' mistaken judgment.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Struthiocamelus Perfidus, a story about a duplicitous ostrich (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Struthiocamelus Perfidus

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Leo et Tauri Duo, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

Leo et Tauri - Osius

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 22

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free PDF copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: #PDF Tribute to Aaron Swartz

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem decimum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Achilles and Penthesilea; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Lege, sapere aude (English: Read; dare to be wise).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Labore omnia florent (English: With hard work, all things flourish).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: In vestimentis non est sapientia mentis (English: A man's clothing does not reveal the wisdom of his mind).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Aquae furtivae dulciores sunt, et panis absconditus suavior (Proverbs 9:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Quam quisque norit artem, in hac se exerceat: Let every man exercise him selfe, in the facultie that he knoweth. Let the cobler medle with cloutinge his neighbours shoes, and not be a Capitaine in fielde, or meddell with matters concerning a comon welth. Let them iudge of controversies in the christen religion, that be learned in the same, and not every Jacke plowman.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Nemo Inimicus. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Suum quisque noscat ingenium.
Let each one discover their own genius.

Adhuc aliquis deus respicit nos.
Some god yet has regard for us.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Apicula et Iuppiter, a story about how the bee got its sting (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ovis, Cervus, et Lupus, a story about a skeptical sheep.

Ovis, Cervus et Lupus - Osius

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: εἶδον βιβλίον κατεσφραγισμένον σφραγῖσιν ἑπτά. Vidi librum signatum sigillis septem. I saw a book sealed with seven seals.