Thursday, November 29, 2012

Round-Up: November 29

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and Nausicaa; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Tuebor (English: I will keep watch).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Non sibi solum (English: Not for oneself alone)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Victrix fortunae sapientia (English: Wisdom is the conqueror of fortune). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Res quanto est maior, tanto est insidiosior (English: The bigger the business, the bigger the trap).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Canes timidi vehementius latrant (English: Dogs that are scared bark more loudly; from Adagia 3.7.100).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Amor Amarus: Nil amor est aliud nisi tristis et aegra voluptas; / Nil nisi dulce malum, nil nisi triste bonum.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Golden Eggs, the story of the famous, and unfortunate, goose.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Apes et Iuppiter, a story about how the bee got its sting.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus Res Sacras Portans , the wonderful story of a self-important ass (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Asinus Sacra Portans



Monday, November 26, 2012

Round-Up: November 26

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cronus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Nemo solus sapit (English: No one is wise by himself).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nil inultum remanebit (English: Nothing will remain unavenged).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ut pater incedit, sic gressus filius edit (English: As the father walks, so are the steps his son will make).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Omnia de terra facta sunt et in terram pariter revertentur (Ecc. 3:20). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sera in fundo parsimonia: It is to late sparinge at the botome. This sentence of Seneca is worthy to be written uppon the boxes of all those houses, of al countinge houses, upon al kaskettes, al vessels of wine or such like thinges. It monisheth us to spare betimes, and not to follow the common sorte of prodigal yongkers, which whan theyr landes and goods be ones fallen into theyr hands, think there is no botome of theyr fathers bagges and cofers, nor no boundes of theyr landes.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Nulla Puella: Nescio tam multis quid scribas, Fauste, puellis: / Hoc scio, quod scribit nulla puella tibi.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Fox and the Lion, a fable on the theme of overcoming fear by means of familiarity.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes Duo et Os, the story of two dogs fighting over a bone (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo Amatorius et Silvanus, the sad story of the lion in love.

Leo Amatorius




Saturday, November 24, 2012

Round-Up: November 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Diogenes and Alexander; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cicatrix manet (English: The scar remains).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Non solum armis (English: Not by arms alone).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Dum fugans canis mingit, fugiens lepus evadit (English: When the dog in pursuit stops to pee, the fleeing rabbit gets away).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Timens Charybdim, incidi in Scyllam (English: Fearing Charybdis, I fell into Scylla).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Cretensis Cretensem (English: It takes one Cretan to best another - the verb is actually missing and has to be specifically supplied from context, the key factor being that Cretans were stereotypically liars and cheats in the ancient world; from Adagia 1.2.26).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Θεός τε τοῖς ἀργοῦσιν οὐ παρίσταται (English: God does not come to the side of the lazy).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Qui Amat, Uritur: Nescio quid sit amor: nec amo, nec amor, nec amavi, / Sed scio, si quis amat, uritur igne gravi.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Fox and the Hedgehog, in which the fox refuses the hedgehog's offer of help.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Monachus, a story about a wolf who would be a monk (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Crocodilus et Canis, the famous fable of the dog and the Nile crocodile.

Canis et Crocodilus




Friday, November 23, 2012

Special Edition: English Proverb Poster Widget

This is not something Latin, but I thought it might be of interest to people here who, like me, enjoy proverbs and words of wisdom from around the world. I'm using AutoMotivator to create motivation posters for proverbs from different countries, rendered in English (my source for the proverbs is David Crystal’s book, As They Say in Zanzibar: Proverbial Wisdom from Around the World).

So, I'm sharing the posters via a Tumblr blog and I've also created a widget (of course) - here is more information about the Proverb Posters widget. Enjoy!



Here is the widget in action, showing a poster at random:





Thursday, November 22, 2012

Round-Up: November 22

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cadmus and the Dragon; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Veritas vincet (English: The truth will be victorious).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Virtus sibimet merces (English: Excellence is its own reward)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ex granis acervus (English: From grains, a heap). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Ubi libertas cecidit, audet libere nemo loqui (English: When freedom has fallen, no one dares to speak freely).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Cauda tenes anguillam (English: You're trying to hold an eel by the tail - which is to say you don't really have hold of it at all; from Adagia 1.4.94).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Fert Omnia Secum: O felix, secum sua quicumque omnia portat, / Fortunae vivens liber ab arbitrio.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Four Bulls and the Lion, a story of divide and conquer.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Alata, the story of a foolish ant who wanted to fly (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo Senex et Vulpes, the story of a fox who knows better than to enter the lion's den.

leo et vulpes




Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Round-Up: November 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Polyxena at the Well; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Ora et labora (English: Pray and work hard).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Spes dabit auxilium (English: Hope will give help).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Temporibus brumae iuxta ignem pocula sume (English: In winter time, sit by the fire and raise your glass).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Qui reddit mala pro bonis, non recedet malum de domo eius (Proverbs 17:13). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sine Cerere et Baccho friget Venus: Without meate and drinke the lust of the body is colde. The beste way to tame carnall lust, is to kepe abstinence of meates and drinkes. Ceres amonges the Panims was taken fro the Goddesse of corne, Bacchus for the God of wine, and Venus for the Goddesse of love. Our Englishe Proverbe confirmeth the same, which saith, A licorouse mouth, a licourouse taile.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Felix et Miser: Dupliciter miser es, quia felix ante fuisti. / Dupliciter felix, qui fuit ante miser.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Fisherman and The Fish, the story of a little fish who tries to bargain with the fisherman.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus Leoni Cantans, a story about a donkey who is proud of his singing (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Capra in Rupe Stans et Lupus, the story of a wise she-goat.

Lupus et Caper


Sunday, November 18, 2012

Round-Up: November 18

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Leda and the Swan; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Sciens cavebo (English: Being aware, I will take care).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Fide et spe (English: With faith and hope).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Pisces minutos magni comedunt (English: The big fish eat the little ones).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Acti labores iucundi sunt (English: Work, once done, is pleasant).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Midae divitiae (English: The wealth of Midas; from Adagia 1.6.24; you can read more about Midas and his golden touch at Wikipedia).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Πολλοί τοι ναρθηκοφόροι, παῦροι δὲ Βάκχοι (English: Many are those who carry the thyrsus, but few are the true followers of Bacchus).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Dies Clarissima: Nulla dies umquam debet clarissima dici / Donec ad occasum sol revocatus erit.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cervus et Vitis, the story of an ungrateful deer.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Fatal Courtship, the sad story of the mouse who married a lioness.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Castor et Venator, the story of the beaver and what a price it pays for its life (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Castor  (1531)


Friday, November 16, 2012

Round-Up: November 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Theseus and the Bull of Marathon; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Incepta persequor (English: I pursue what I have begun).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Inscitia mater arrogantiae (English: Ignorance is the mother of arrogance)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ditior Croeso (English: Richer than Croesus). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Discipulus est prioris posterior dies (English: The day after is the student of the day before).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Homo homini lupus (English: Man is a wolf to man; from Adagia 1.1.70).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Damna Dierum: Damna fleo rerum, sed plus fleo damna dierum; / Quisque potest rebus succurrere, nemo diebus.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Sanctus Petrus et Rusticus, a medieval fable about the wisdom of Saint Peter (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Eagle and The Crow, a story about an overly ambitious crow.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mures, Feles, et Tintinnabulum, the famous fable of belling the cat.

mures et feles


Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Round-Up: November 14

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem duodevicesimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Penelope and the Suitors; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Ad maiora veniamus (English: Let us go toward greater things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Monstrant astra viam (English: The stars show the way).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Casus dementis correctio fit sapientis (English: The downfall of the witless person becomes a lesson for the wise man).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nolite thesaurizare vobis thesauros in terra, ubi fures effodiunt et furantur (Matt. 6:19). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Non omnes qui habent citharam, sunt citharoedi: Al that have harpes be no harpers. Outwarde signes manie times deceive men. All that have the gospell hanging at theyr gyrdels, be no gospelers. For againe al that dispraise the leude fascions of the Papistes, be not forthwith Heretiques. Wee ought not to iudge accordinge to the outwarde apperaunce of thinges.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Vita Quae Praeteriit: Nec quae praeteriit rursum revocabitur unda, / Nec quae praeteriit vita redire potest.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Tubicen Captus, a story about war and the people who make it (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Dog in The Manger, a famous story about a hungry cow and a spiteful dog.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Rusticus de Arbore Delapsus, a funny story about just what it means to fall down out of a tree.

De Arbore Descendens



Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Monday, November 12, 2012

Round-Up: November 12

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: pridie Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pygmalion and the Statue; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cave lupum (English: Beware the wolf).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ne quid nimis (English: Not anything in excess).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Fera quaevis in sua silva superbit (English: Every beast exults in its forest).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Egregia musica quae sit abscondita, nulli rei est (English: Outstanding music, if it is hidden, is of no account).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ne Hercules quidem adversus duos (English: Not even Hercules fights against two at once; from Adagia 1.5.39).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὸν τὸ ἑαυτὸν γνῶναι, ἀλλὰ μακάριον (English: To know oneself is a difficult but fortunate thing).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Tempus Volubile: Cuncta trahit secum vertitque volubile tempus, / Nec patitur certa currere quemque via.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Cervus et Amici Eius, a story of friends who do more harm than good (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Crane and the Peacock, in which the crane rebukes the boastful peacock.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Pavo et Iuno, the famous story of the peacock's complaint to Hera.

Pavo et Iuno


Saturday, November 10, 2012

Round-Up: November 10

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Centaur Nessus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Maiora sequor (English: I follow greater things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is In varietate voluptas (English: There is a pleasure in variety)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Non mare transisset, pavidus si nauta fuisset (English: The sailor would not have crossed the sea, if he had been afraid). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Solet hora, quod multi anni abstulerunt, reddere (English: Often a single hour restores when many years had taken away).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Capra nondum peperit, haedus autem ludit in tectis (English: The goat hasn't given birth yet, but the kid is already playing on the rooftops - a bit like counting your chickens before they have hatched, but with a baby goat instead; from Adagia 2.6.10).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Res In Se Recurrentes: Rebus in humanis adeo in se cuncta recurrunt, / Finis ut unius sit caput alterius. This is an emblematic distich, so it has an illustration:



And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mulier Puerpera et Lectus, one of Phaedrus' joking fables (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Canis Villaticus, a story about a dog who is ready to take a stand and fight back and the lesson he provides for some human soldiers.

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Crab and his Mother, a famous story of "do as I say, not as I do." You can read a Latin version of the story here.

Cancri Duo



Thursday, November 8, 2012

Round-Up: November 8

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Origin of the Milky Way; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Quae prosunt sequor (English: I pursue things that are useful).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Morsus morsum ducit (English: One bite leads to another).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Non vult scire satur, quid ieiunus patiatur (English: The well-fed man does not want to know what the hungry man feels).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Comedamus et bibamus; cras enim moriemur (Isaiah 22:13). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Fertilior seges est alieno semper in auro: The corne in an other mans ground, semeth evermore fertil and plentifull then doth oure owne.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Omnia Tempus Habent: Omnia tempus habent: flebis dum tempora flendi, / Ride dum risum tempora laeta ferunt.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pulex et Abbas, a wonderful little story about a tricky flea (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Cat and Venus, the famous story of what happened when Venus turned a cat into a woman.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Catus et Gallus, the story of a self-righteous cat and a doomed rooster.


Feles et Gallus


Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Round-Up: November 6

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Idus Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Eurystheus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Meliora supersunt (English: The better things survive).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Volenti nil difficile (English: For one who is willing, nothing is difficult).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Disparibus bubus numquam trahitur bene currus (English: The cart is never pulled well when the oxen do not match).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: eritas liberabit (English: The truth will set you free).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Sine Cerere et Baccho friget Venus (English: Without Ceres and Bacchus, Venus grows cold; from Adagia 2.3.97 - in other words, without bread and wine, love grows cold).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ὦ ὁῖα κεφαλὴ, καὶ ἐγκέφαλον οὐκ ἔχει (English: O such a head, and yet it has not brains - this being the punchline to the Aesop's fable about the animal - sometimes a fox, sometimes a wolf - and the mask).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Tempus Tuum: Res est una, tuam possis quam dicere: tempus. / Utere! Dum cessas, desinit esse tuum.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Aquila et Mus, the sad story of a mouse and an ungrateful eagle (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is Hercules and The Waggoner, a story of how the gods help them that help themselves.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Muli et Latrones, a wonderful story in favor of the simple life.


Muli Duo




Sunday, November 4, 2012

Round-Up: November 4

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Nonas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Briseis; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Meliora spero (English: I hope for better things).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Ad Graecas calendas (English: On the Greek calends)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Qui gladio ferit, gladio perit (English: He who wounds by the sword, dies by the sword). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Sapiens locum dat requiescendi iniuriae (English: The wise man allows space for an outrage to settle down).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas (English: The judgment absolves the crows and troubles the doves; from Adagia 3.5.73).

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Hora Fugax: Temporis in mundo res nulla fugacior hora; / Quam cum praesentem credimus, illa fuit.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Young Cocks, a story of fleeting victory.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Alauda, Pulli, et Agri Dominus, the story of the lark made famous by Ennius (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ranae Duae et Puteus, the story of two frogs - one cautious, one reckless.

Ranae Duae et Puteus

Friday, November 2, 2012

Round-Up: November 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Nonas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Medea and the Daughters of Pelias; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Timor omnis abesto (English: Away with all fear).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Qui audet adipiscitur (English: He who dares gets what he aims at).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Omnia transibunt! Sic ibimus, ibitis, ibunt (English: All things will pass away! So we will go, you will go, they will go).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Homo ad laborem nascitur et avis ad volatum (Job 5:7). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Saepe etiam stultus fuit opportuna locutus: Oftentimes even the foole hitteth the nayle on the head, and speaketh thinges in place. This Proverbe admonisheth us, not to reiecte ne despise an holsome and right sentence, spoken otherwhiles oute of a rude felowes mouth.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Auctores Veteres et Recentes: Auctores miror veteres, mirorque recentes: / Pulchra mihi, quisquis dixerit illa, placent.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mus in Olla, a story about a mouse drowning in goodness (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Wolf and the Fox, a story about a wolf who falls victim, once again, to the fox's quick-wittedness.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Serpens Calcata et Apollo, a story a downtrodden snake.


Serpens Calcatus et Iuppiter