Friday, November 2, 2012

Round-Up: November 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Nonas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Medea and the Daughters of Pelias; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.



TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Timor omnis abesto (English: Away with all fear).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Qui audet adipiscitur (English: He who dares gets what he aims at).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Omnia transibunt! Sic ibimus, ibitis, ibunt (English: All things will pass away! So we will go, you will go, they will go).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Homo ad laborem nascitur et avis ad volatum (Job 5:7). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Saepe etiam stultus fuit opportuna locutus: Oftentimes even the foole hitteth the nayle on the head, and speaketh thinges in place. This Proverbe admonisheth us, not to reiecte ne despise an holsome and right sentence, spoken otherwhiles oute of a rude felowes mouth.

BREVISSIMA: The distich for today is Auctores Veteres et Recentes: Auctores miror veteres, mirorque recentes: / Pulchra mihi, quisquis dixerit illa, placent.

And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mus in Olla, a story about a mouse drowning in goodness (this fable has a vocabulary list).

AESOP IN ENGLISH VERSE: Today's fable from the English verse widget is The Wolf and the Fox, a story about a wolf who falls victim, once again, to the fox's quick-wittedness.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Serpens Calcata et Apollo, a story a downtrodden snake.


Serpens Calcatus et Iuppiter


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