Friday, July 29, 2011

SPECIAL EDITION: Carolus Lebeau

As those of you who follow my Google Books blog already know, yesterday was quite an amazing day for me: a bookseller in Philadelphia by chance alerted me to a neo-Latin author of Aesop's fables whom I had never heard of before: Carolus Lebeau, or Charles Le Beau. Even better, a reader of that blog helped me in tracking down all four volumes of Lebeau's Latin works, which contain not just Aesop's fables but all kinds of tantalizing delights drawn from both Biblical and secular history. The timing of this is not great, since I have to start back at my real job on Monday... so I am going to suspect my various blogs for the weekend and just concentrate on inventorying the materials in these four books and publishing a list of the titles of the items for anyone else who is interested in exploring this unexpected treasure trove. I'll be keeping all my Leabeau materials over at my Google Books blog: Google Books - Lebeau.

To whet your appetites, I have transcribed the first of his Aesopic fables in verse here (from Volume 1, Carmina). I know it can be intimidating to read Latin poetry, so I have also presented a segmented version of the fable below. It's a variation on the famous fable of the woodsman and Mercury, known to Latin readers from the version in Phaedrus but also part of the Greek Aesopic tradition as well. Lebeau shows himself to have a wonderful sense of humor in adapting the story. The poem is full of all kinds of great little details and a fantastic surprise ending that conveys the same moral as the traditional version but with a visceral punch! The Latin is really not too hard at all - there was one historical infinitive construction which I changed to the imperfect in the segmented version, but other than that I have just arranged the words in a more straightforward order. Enjoy!

Lignator et Mercurius

Perdiderat vitae spem subsidiumque, securim,
Lignator, quam perque vias perque invia quaerens,
Ibat luctisono turbans nemora alta boatu.
Quid faciat? Iam torpet iners, iam pendet inermis
Dextera; iam nulla est heu! quae fuit una, securis.
Ergo per invisos saltus ieiunus et expes
Reptabat, rugas fletu humectante seniles.
"O mea," clamabat; "redde hanc, O summe Deorum!
Redde, vel ipse tua caput hoc abscinde bipenni."
Audit Omnipotens. Caelo Cillenius ales
Devolat. "Illa tibi non occidit, O bone! Vultus
Terge tuos; poterisne memor gaudere reperta?
Fallimus, aut media splendentem vidimus herba."
Et simul haec, simul una, Deo signante, reluxit
Aurea. "Fortunae non sunt haec munera nostrae,"
Alter ait. Dein argento nitet altera. Tristis
Abnegat. E noto monstratur tertia ligno.
Exilit hic; "Nostra est, animae pars maxima," clamat,
"Nostra veni." "Reliquas etiam," Deus inquit, "habeto,
Praemia sincerae mentis." Capit ille renidens.
Fama simul totis volat undique garrula silvis.
Omnis lignator certatim perdere ferrum
Sponte fluens, caelumque avidis incendere votis.
Non habet attonitas quo vertat Iupiter aures.
Mercurium sibi quisque vocat. Mora nulla vocanti
Missus adest, monstratque auro radiante securim.
Protinus, "Haec nostra est," clamat ridente metallo
Callida gens. At non incallidus alter, aventes
Frustratur dextras: mentitam ut quisque bipennem
Captat hians, caput impacto gravis increpat auro.

Lignator securim perdiderat,
vitae spem subsidiumque;
ibat, securim quaerens
perque vias perque invia,
nemora alta turbans
luctisono boatu.
Quid faciat?
Iam dextera torpet iners,
iam pendet inermis;
heu!
iam nulla est securis
quae una fuit.
Ergo reptabat
per invisos saltus,
ieiunus et expes,
fletu rugas seniles humectante.
"O mea securis!" clamabat;
"Redde hanc, O summe Deorum!
Redde,
vel ipse caput hoc abscinde
tua bipenni."
Audit Omnipotens.
Cillenius ales caelo devolat.
"O bone vir,
illa bipennis tibi non occidit.
Vultus tuos terge;
reperta securi,
poterisne gaudere memor?
Fallimus,
aut splendentem vidimus

media herba."
Et simul haec Deo signante,
simul una reluxit securis - aurea!
Alter ait,
"Haec munera nostrae Fortunae non sunt."
Dein altera argento nitet.
Tristis abnegat.
Tertia monstratur, e ligno noto.
Hic exilit; clamat:
"Nostra est, animae pars maxima!
Nostra veni!"
Deus inquit:
"Reliquas etiam habeto
praemia sincerae mentis."
Ille capit, renidens.
Simul fama garrula volat
totis silvis undique.
Omnis lignator,
certatim fluens,
ferrum sponte perdebat
caelumque avidis votis incendebat.
Iupiter non habet
quo vertat aures attonitas.
Quisque Mercurium sibi vocat.
Missus vocanti adest, mora nulla,
monstratque securim, auro radiante.
Protinus callida gens clamat,
ridente metallo:
"Haec nostra est!"
At alter, non incallidus,
frustratur dextras aventes:
ut quisque, hians,
mentitam bipennem captat,
gravis caput increpat
impacto auro.

Lignator et Mercurius

Click here for a SLIDESHOW of all the Aesop 1660 images.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Round-Up: July 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 54 (2651-2700) and Scala 55 (2701-2750). Here's a fun one: Invenies multos, mores qui pelle sub agni celant luporum, "You will find many men who hide their wolf personality beneath the skin of a lamb."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is MANUS - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Multae manus onus levant, "Many hands lighten the load."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Neptunus, a description of Neptune, aka Poseidon.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Pirata et Alexander Rex, the famous story of Alexander's dialogue with the pirate.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Verveces et Lanius , a story about how a single butcher can slaughter an entire flock of sheep.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Rubus et Hortulanus, a story about a gardener and a wicked thornbush, and Rhodopis et Aquila, the wonderful story of Rhodopis, often called the "Egyptian Cinderella."

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Boxhorn's Originum Gallicarum Liber and Robertson's Praseologia Generalis .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Animum rege (English: Control your mind).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Mihi cura futuri (English: My care is for the future).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Scit multa vulpes, magnum echinus unicum (English: The fox knows many things; the hedgehog knows one big thing).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Argento obediunt omnia (English: All things obey the silver coin).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Haud quaquam difficile Atheniensem Athenis laudare (English: To praise an Athenian when in Athens is not hard at all; from Adagia 2.1.66).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Καιρὸς ψυχὴ πράγματος (English: The critical moment - kairos - is the soul of the action).

For an image today, here is a medieval depiction of Alexander and the pirate: 913. Pirata et Alexander Rex. Alexander olim cum pirata collocutus, “Quo,” inquit, “iure mare infestas?” “Eodem, quo tu terras,” respondit ille; “ego autem latro vocor, quod mihi una solum navicula est; tu victor appellaris, quod classes et exercitus habes. Victorum enim et piratarum maleficia differunt non meritis, sed magnitudine.” (source - easy version)

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Special Edition: Texting Abbreviations

Lauren Stein suggested coming up with a list of Latin abbreviations for texting. Below you will find an accumulating list of possibilities. Do you have additions to the list? Favorites that you already use? Let's see what we can come up with! You can leave comments here at the blog, or if you are on Google+ leave a comment at this public Google+ post, which is where I will keep the growing list (I'll update the list in this blog post periodically, but Google+ is where the latest version will be).

I thought this was a really fun idea! Texting abbreviations are a matter of conventions - so you could have personal conventions (abbreviations you and your friends use), conventions for a particular Latin class (students and teacher pick the ones they want to learn and use), and maybe some of these might even enter into general circulation. In varietate voluptas, after all! So please feel free to add more - who knows which ones might become popular!

What's interesting to me is how the abbreviations leave off the Latin endings - which is great for gender things (so amicus or amica are the same, for example), but it also leaves other things ambiguous, like the things I have marked below as first-person or second-person. After all, when abbreviated, there's really no difference... but the texting context would help make it clear I think just how the words would be understood.

This is very much a work in progress, done hurriedly before I have to get back to school - but I'll definitely keep working on this, and feedback is most welcome!

Based on English texting:
AFP: Amici fidelissimi perpetuo. = BFF
AMSV: Apud me sis volo. = WYWH
BT: Brevi tempore. = BRB
ENS: Ego non scio. = IDK
FIS: Fac ipse sibi. = DIY
FMC: Fac me certiorem. = LMK
GF: Gratias futuras. = TIA
HPC: Humi provolutus cachinnans = ROFLOL
HPR: Humi provolutus ridens = ROFL
IATG: Immortales ago tibi gratias. = TYVM
ICH: In cacchinnos hians. = LOL
LT: Ludo tantum. = JK
MVR: Magna voce ridens. = LOL
NCOQL: Ne credas omnibus quae legis. = DBEYR
NMD: Nimis mihi dicis. = TMI
NS: Nescio. = DK
OME: Opus mihi est. = ISO
PDI: Proh di immortales. = OMG
QC: Quam citissime. = ASAP
QLV: Quantilibet valeat = FWIW
QNI: Quidnam Inferorum. = WTF
RA: Redibo actutum. = BRB
ROR: Rotundo ore ridens. = LOL
SC: Sine cura. = NP
SHM: Sententia humili mea. = IMHO
TCPM: Tecum colloquar postmodo. = TTYL
UEQO: Ut ego quidem opinor. = IMHO
VDO = OIC
VR: Valde ridens. = LOL
VVTM: Vae, vae tibi maledicto. = STBY

Existing Latin abbreviations:
EG: Exempli gratia.
FFF: Felix, faustum, fortunatum.
NB: Nota bene.
PS: Post scriptum.
QED: Quod erat demonstrandum.
RIP: Requiescat in pace.
SD: Salutem dicit.
SPD: Salutem plurimam dicit.
SVBEEV: Si vales bene est ego valeo.

Commands:
AAA: Abi ad Acherontem!
AAC: Abi ad corvos!
AAE: Aequo animo esto!
AAV: Ave atque vale.
AEA: Audendum est - age!
ANC: Aliena noli curare.
ASP: Aspice, respice, prospice.
BAE: Bono animo esto.
BHA: Bonum habe animum.
CD: Carpe diem.
CFV: Cui fidas, vide.
CUV: Cura ut valeas.
DCL: Digito compesce labellum.
DOD: De omnibus dubitandum.
DQV: Discendum quamdiu vivamus.
DSN: Deme supercilio nubem.
DVC: Da veniam culpae.
DVL: Da veniam lacrimis.
EP: Esto paratus.
FL: Festina lente.
FNR: Fato non repugnandum.
FSF: Fac, si facis.
FTP: Fortem te praebe!
IBA: Ito bonis avibus.
ICO: Inultile curae omittendae.
IDA: In dubiis, abstine.
LPI: Leoninam pellem indue.
MVE: Macte virtute esto.
NCC: Ne cito credas.
NCM: Ne cede malis.
ND: Non desperandum.
NFC: Ne fronti crede.
NIC: Noli irritare crabrones.
NIL: Noli irritare leones.
NQN: Ne quid nimis.
NSS: Nihil sollicitus sis.
NTE: Noli tristis esse.
OCE: Occasio capienda est.
PCD: Permitte cetera divis.
REO: Rapienda est occasio.
ROC: Rem omnem considera.
RSS: Ride si sapis.
RTC: Res tuas cura.
TAF: Tace aut fac.
TFU: Tempus fugit - utere!
TTT: Tempera te tempori.
VBD: Volentem bovem ducito.
VIP: Vade in pace.

Wishes:
AID: Absit iactantia dicto.
AIV: Absit invidia verbo.
BF: Bonam Fortunam.
BTD: Benedicat tibi Dominus.
DA: Deus avertat.
DAM: Deus, adiuva me!
DDM: Domine, dirige me!
DMD: Di meliora dent!
DOA: Dii omen avertant!
DTA: Di te ament.
DTF: Deus te fortunet!
FDV: Fiat dei voluntas.
FF: Faveat Fortuna.
LLT: Lux luceat tua.
MMD: Miserere mei, deus!
MMM: Me meliora manent.
RAT: Rumor acerbe, tace.
SAA: Sidus adsit amicum.
SFD: Stet fortuna domus.
SST: Sic semper tyrannis.
TOA: Timor omnis abesto.
VRMS: Vade retro me, Satana!

1st Person:
ACT: Anguillam cauda teneo.
ALT: Auribus lupum teneo.
FMM: Faciam meo modo.
INC: Ista non curo.
LOM: Lapidem omnem movebo.
LQS: Loquor quae sentio.
MCS: Meo contentus sum.
MPD: Me pudet dicere.
MTE: Me tibi excuso.
NC: Nolo contendere.
QDD: Quod dixi, dixi.
QM: Quid multa?
QP: Quid plura?
QPD: Quid plura dicam?
QPS: Quidni pro sodali?
QSS: Quod scripsi, scripsi.
UBD: Ut breviter dicam.
VVV: Veni, vidi, vici.

2nd Person:
ATT: Ante tubam trepidas.
CNQ: Caput Nili quaeris.
CSD: Camelum saltare doces.
DD: Doctum doces.
LCC: Linguam caninam comedisti.
PND: Piscem natare doces.
SPM: Spargis porcis margaritas.
SPS: Sisyphium portas saxum.
SSE: Satisne sanus es?
SVP: Si vis, potes.
UAP: Ululas (vel uvas) Athenas portas.
UR: Uti rogas.

Phrases:
AH: Amico Hercule.
AI: Ad infinitum.
AKG: Ad Kalendas Graecas.
AN: Ad nauseam.
CBM: Cyprii bovis merenda.
CGS: Cum grano salis.
CL: Cum laude.
CM: Compos mentis.
CP: Ceteris paribus.
DG: Dei gratia.
DV: Deo volente.
EME: Ex musca elephantem.
ETB: Et tu, Brute.
FC: Felix culpa.
HAP: Hannibal ad portas.
IA: Inter alia.
ID: Ipse dixit.
IFD: In flagrante delicto.
IOP: In omnia paratus.
LVP: Libens, volens, potens.
MC: Mea culpa.
MCL: Magna cum laude.
MD: Mirabile dictu.
MM: mutatis mutandis
MMC: Mea maxima culpa.
MP: Multa paucis.
MV: Mirabile visu.
NL: Non liquet.
NO: Nihil obstat.
NPU: Nec plus ultra.
NS: Non sequitur.
NV: Nolens, volens.
NVQ: Ne vestigium quidem.
PBR: Pulchre, bene, recte!
PNG: Persona non grata.
PVMV: Plusve minusve.
SCL: Summa cum laude.
SF: Semper fidelis.
SR: Sub rosa.
TST: Tarde, sed tute.

Sayings:
AAP: Alia aliis placent.
AAS: Alii aliter sentiunt.
AFF: Audaci favet Fortuna.
AIE: Alea iacta est.
APM: Asinus portat mysteria.
BDI: Bellum dulce inexpertis.
BTP: Barba tenus philosophus.
CAE: Cras alia evenient.
CBT: Currus bovem trahit.
CDE: Carthago delenda est.
COP: Cura omnia potest.
CS: Cuique suum.
DAV: Dis aliter visum.
DF: Dictum, factum.
DOP: Difficile omnibus placere.
DP: Dominus providebit.
DSI: Dubium sapientiae initium.
EHE: Errare humanum est.
EMM: Excessit medicina malum.
EPP: Etiam prudentissimus peccat.
FCL: Fictae crocodili lacrimulae.
FCM: Fortunate cetera mando.
FDA: Facilis descensus Averno.
FSC: Factum stultus cognoscit.
FVI: Fata viam invenient.
HIL: Hic iacet lepus.
IDP: Ita dis placuit.
IEF: Inevitabile est fatum.
INE: Ignorantia non excusat.
IP: Intelligenti pauca.
IV: Ita vita.
IVV: In varietate voluptas.
LNE: Litterae non erubescunt.
LSF: Lusus habet finem.
MMP: Mons murem peperit.
MSD: Minervam sus docet.
NAV: Negotium ante voluptatem.
NCS: Nulla calamitas sola.
NDN: Nemo doctus natus.
NI: Nil impossibile.
NOP: Nemo omnibus placet.
OT: Omnia transibunt.
PAD: Post amara, dulcia.
PNP: Post nubila, Phoebus.
QNQ: Qualitas, non quantitas.
QTC: Qui tacet, consentit.
RFA: Rarus fidus amicus.
RIL: Res ipsa loquitur.
RSV: Romanus sedendo vincit.
SCP: Suum cuique placet.
SDV: Sic dii voluerunt.
SIN: Stultorum infinitus numerus.
SSP: Sero sapiunt Phryges.
SVM: Stultus verba multiplicat.
TF: Tempus fugit.
TOM: Tempus optima medicina.
TOR: Tempus omnia revelat.
VNI: Volenti nihil impossibile.
VPL: Vigilia pretium libertatis.
VSS: Verbum sat sapienti.






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Round-Up: July 26

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 51 (2501-2550) , Scala 52 (2551-2600), and Scala 53 (2601-2650). Here's a good one: Equo donato noli respicere in os, "Don't look a gift-horse in the mouth."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is the tiny little ET - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Veritas est super omnia amanda et sequenda, "Truth above all things is to be loved and followed."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Venus, a description of the goddess of love.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Sol et Ventus, a story about the persuasive powers of the sun and of the wind.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Naufragi Duo, a story about abstract and practical knowledge, and Anseres et Anus, a funny story about some plucked geese.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Conybeare's Letters and Exercises of the Elizabethan Schoolmaster and Le Tort's Gnomologia, seu Repertorium Sententiarum .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Sublimiora sepectemus (English: Let us gaze upon higher things).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Post acerba prudentior (English: After bitter experiences, more wise)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is E verbis fatuos, ex aure tenemus asellum (English: We hold a donkey by the ear; we hold fools by their words). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Audendo virtus crescit, tardando timor (English: Virtue grows by daring, while fear grows by delaying).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Sus Minervam docet (English: A pig is teaching Minerva; from Adagia 1.1.40 - it's an absurd proposition, of course, since a pig would have little it could teach to the goddess of wisdom!).

For an image today, here you can see the wind and the sun: 741. Sol et Ventus. Sol et Aquilo certabant uter sit fortior. Conventum est experiri vires in viatorem, ut palmam ferat qui excusserit viatoris manticam. Boreas horrisono turbine viatorem aggreditur. At ille non desistit, amictum gradiendo duplicans. Assumit vices Sol qui, nimbo paulatim evicto, totos emolitur radios. Incipit viator aestuare, sudare, anhelare. Tandem progredi nequiens, sub frondoso nemore, obiecta mantica, resedit, et ita Soli victoria contingebat. (source)

Sol et Boreas

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Round-Up: July 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: I hit a new milestone with the Scala project, with 2500 proverbs - Scala 50 (2451-2500) . Here's a good one warning about procrastination: Fac hodie: fugit haec non reditura dies, "Do it today: this day is running away, not to return."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is MAIOR - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Piscem vorat maior minorem, "The big fish eats the little one."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Bacchus Depictus, about the ways in which Bacchus is depicted and what they mean.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Pavo et Iuno, the story of the peacock's complaint to Juno.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Fur et Puer , the hilarious little story of the thief and the boy at the well.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Vultures Duo et Canes, the story of two vultures - one wise and one foolish, and Cicadae et Passerculi, the story of the crickets, the sparrows and a special tree.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Faber's Alphabetum Morale Politicum and Benham's Book of Quotations, Proverbs and Household Words .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Dei sumus adiutores (English: We are God's helpers).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Dies diem docet (English: One day teaches another).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Pauperis in causa non auris sit tibi clausa (English: Don't shut your ear to the plea of the poor man).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Nemo potest duobus dominis servire (Matt. 6:24). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Aequalem tibi uxorem quaere: Marry thy like. What inconveniences proceede of unegall mariages, as when the olde persone marieth with the yonge, the poore with the riche, the ignoble with the noble, who seeth not?.

For an image today, here is the story of the boy and the thief: 910. Fur et Puer. Puer sedebat, flens, apud puteum. Fur causam flendi rogat; puer dicit, fune rupto, urnam auri incidisse in aquas. Homo se exuit, insilit in puteum, quaerit. Vase non invento, conscendit atque ibi nec invenit puerum, nec suam tunicam, quippe puer, tunica sublata, fugerat. Interdum falluntur, qui solent fallere. (source)

puer flens et fur

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Round-Up: July 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 49 (2401-2450) and Scala 48 (2351-2400). Here's one that holds true today: Bellum se ipsum alet, "The war will feed itself."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is CURA - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Vestes a tinea roduntur, pectora cura, "Clothes are gnawed by a moth, while hearts are gnawed by worry."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Bacchus et Bacchantes, an account of Bacchus, his festivals and his worshippers.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Asinus Leonis Pelle Indutus, the famous story of the donkey in the lion's skin.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Camelus et Simia, a story about a camel and a dancing monkey.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Vipera et Viator, a story about the danger of taking pity on a snake, and Palumbes, Cornix, et Venator, a story about a dove who is fooled by a man with a bow.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Dunlop's Selections from the Latin Anthology and Valpy's Delectus Sententiarum et Historiarum .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Crasso nummatior (English: With more money than Crassus).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Dux mihi veritas (English: Truth is my guide).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Ex ovis pravis non bona venit avis (English: From bad eggs no good bird comes).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: In domo patris mei, mansiones multae sunt (English: In my father's house, there are many mansions).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ne e quovis ligno Mercurius fiat (English: You can't make a statue of Mercury out of just any block of wood; from Adagia 2.5.47).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀρχὴ ἥμισυ παντός (English: The start is half of the whole).

In honor of the saying about Crassus - Crasso nummatior - I thought I would include this bust of the famous Roman general:

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Round-Up: July 19

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 46 (2251-2300) and Scala 47 (2301-2350). Here's a good one: Noli committere omnia uni navi, "Don't entrust all your stuff to one ship" (compare the English saying, "Don't put all your eggs in one basket").

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is VALDE - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Saepe etiam est stultus valde opportuna locutus, "Often even a fool has spoken things that are exactly spot-on."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Bacchus, Iovis Filius, the strange birth story of Bacchus.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Struthiocamelus Perfidus, the story of the treacherous antics of the camel in the war of the birds and the beasts.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Feles et Gallinae, the story of the cat who wanted to be a doctor to the chickens.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Young's New Latin Delectus and Thring's Latin Gradual .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Vivat veritas (English: Long live truth).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnia idem pulvis (English: Everything is the same dust)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nihil annis velocius (English: Nothing is faster than the years). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Semper quiescens des iniuriae locum (English: By always taking it easy, you invite your own injury).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Citius elephantum sub ala celes (English: You'd more quickly hide an elephant under your arm; from Adagia 2.5.56 - compare the English proverbial impossibility "when hell freezes over").

For an image today, here's a "Wordle" I made for the latest installment of proverbs at the Scala! Thanks to Rachel Ash over at Google+Circles for reminding me about the power of Wordle. Is anybody else out there using Google+Circles? You can find me there at http://plus.ly/lauragibbs (and if you'd like an invite to Google+, just send me a note - laurakgibbs AT gmail).

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Round-Up: July 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Augustas.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rung on the Scala is Scala 45 (2201-2250). Here's a fun one: Ibis redibis numquam peribis - and I'm not going to translate that, or even punctuate it, because that would spoil the game!

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is GERO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Bella gerant alii; Protesilaus amet! - "Let others wage the wars; let Protesilaus love!"

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Diana, Soror Apollinis, a description of the goddess Diana (Greek Artemis).

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Prometheus, Leo, et Elephantus, the story of a despondent lion and how an elephant cheered him up.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Vultur Convivium Faciens, the story of the vulture's wicked birthday party.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Trench's Sacred Latin Poetry and Sewall's The Latin Speaker .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Virtus omnia vincit (English: Excellence overcomes all things).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Mediocritas optima est (English: Mediocrity is best - although mediocrity means nothing good in English anymore, it was once the "Golden Mean").

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Vultu talis eris, qualia mente geris (English: You will show in your face what you think in your mind).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is In domo Patris mei mansiones multae sunt (John 14:2). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Faber compedes quas fecit ipse gestet: The fetters that the smith hath made, let him were them him selfe. The Proverbe whiche commonly we use in english, for this purpose is this: such ale as he hath brued let him drinke him self. Verely manie there be, which make a rod for theyr owne arse..

Today's image is the vulture's birthday party, 458. Vultur Convivium Faciens. Vultur, volens laute prandere et ventrem suum delicatis cibis infarcire, invitavit aviculas ad convivium, natalem suum, ut dicebat, celebraturus. Haec fama exiit inter eas et hoc aucupio incautas fefellit. Veniunt igitur undique, existimantes invenire mensas omnis generis deliciarum refertas, non de suo paraturas. Sed ubi, adventatis ac coactis omnibus, fores occlusae sunt et vultur rapere et mactare et occidere coepit, “O insanas nos et vecordes,” inquiunt, “quae vulturi, inimico nostro, fidimus, et apud eum putantes reperire escas, ipsae eius escae factae sumus.” (source)

vultur et aves

Friday, July 15, 2011

Round-Up: July 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: Idus Iuliae, the Ides of July!

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 43 (2101-2150), and Scala 44 (2151-2200) . Here's a wise one: Mors aequabit quos pecunia separavit, "Death will make equal those whom money had distinguished" (distinguished in life, that is!).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is VERUS - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Quis sibi verum dicere ausus est?, "Who has dared to speak the truth to himself?"

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Aurora, and her unfortunate love for the mortal Tithonus (see below).

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Apicula et Iuppiter, the story of an angry bee and her complaint to Jupiter.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Rana et Bos, the story of the puffed-up frog.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Colonus et Adiutores Eius , a great story about "manual" labor, and Rusticus Athleta Factus, a funny story about a country bumpkin competing in the Olympics.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Lord's edition of Cicero's de Amicitia and Champlin's Selections from Tacitus.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Subvenite oppresso (English: Help him who is oppressed).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Vigilia pretium libertatis (English: Watchfulness is the price of liberty).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Sero paras stabulum, taurum iam fure trahente (English: It's too late to ready the stable when the thief is already leading the bull away).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Qui altam facit domum, quaerit suam ruinam (English: He who builds a high house seeks his own downfall).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Omnia sub unam Myconum (English: Everything buried under Mykonos alone; from Adagia 2.4.47 - This refers to how Heracles buried the defeated Giants by throwing rocks on them and those rocks became the island of Mykonos; since those last Giants were of various shapes and sizes, the proverb refers to a hodge-podge of things being put into one place).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὴν ἅλμην κυκᾷς, πρὶν τοὺς ἰχθύας ἑλεῖν (English: You're preparing the salting brine before you've caught the fish).

For an image today, here is Aurora: Inter Apollinis liberos nonnulli numerant Auroram. Haec Tithonum, Laomedontis filium, habuit in matrimonium eique immortalitatem a Iove impetravit, nec tamen obtinere potuit, ne senesceret. Itaque senio fractus, in cicadam ut mutaretur, exoravit. (source)

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Round-Up: July 13

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Idus Iulias.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: I did a big reorganization of the Scala today, updating the first 2000 proverbs to reflect appx. 200 new items I had found over the past couple of weeks which fit into that part of the Scala, and I did a listing of the sayings based on Diederich's frequency list, for his top 100 words, 200 words, 300 words and so on; you can see the Diederich listing here.

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is UT - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Ut amnis, vita labitur, "Life slips on by like a stream of water."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Apollo et Musae, the story of Apollo and all the Muses - how many of the nine Muses can you name...?

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Divitiae et Simulacrum Sacrum, a hilarious story about a man and his cult statue.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Graculus et Pavones, the story of a self-important jackdaw.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Prometheus et Homines, a story about the creation of humans and animals, and Iuppiter et Nux, the sad story of the nut tree who got just what she wished for.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Jerram's edition of Aeneid I and Lincoln's Selections from the Poems of Ovid.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Interdum requiescendum (English: We need to rest once in a while).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Fructus laboris gloria (English: Glory is the fruit of effort)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Fortuna est rotunda (English: Fortune is round). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Qui sibimet vivit, aliis est emortuus (English: He who lives just for himself is dead to others).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Carpathius leporem (English: The Carpathian and the rabbit; from Adagia 2.1.81 - Erasmus informs us that originally there were no rabbits on the island of Karpathos, and when someone imported them, they overran the island and ate the crops).

Here's an illustration for that story about the man and his divine statue: 991. Divitiae et Simulacrum Sacrum. Quidam, domi suae, consecrata nescio cuius divi lignea statua, colere hanc et sertis ornare assidue solebat et petere ab hac divitias et opes. Sed hoc cum frustra longo tempore fecisset (non modo enim non augebatur res ipsius, sed etiam diminuebatur), iratus tandem, apprehensum pedibus simulacrum terrae inflixit. Illiso autem forte in saxum capite effractoque, magna vis auri effunditur quod in eo fuerat inclusum. Hoc colligens, ille “Magna est,” inquit, “perversitas tua, dive, qui venerantem te neglexeris et affligentem ditaveris.” (source - easy version)

Homo et Statua

Monday, July 11, 2011

Round-Up: July 11

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. *NOVITAS* - I'm also at Google+Circles - are there any other Latinists out there using Google+Circles...? "Circle me" if you are!

HODIE: ante diem quintum Idus Iulias.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rung on the Scala is Scala 39 (1901-1950) . Here's a good one from this group: Unusquisque in arte sua sapiens est, "Each and every person is wise in his own craft."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is QUOQUE - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog - it's very brief for today's word in fact, since I did not have much to say about quoque, although there are some great proverb examples! Here's one of them: Sanat, sanctificat, ditat quoque surgere mane, "Getting up early makes you healthy, holy and wealthy, too" (compare the Ben Franklin version in English: "Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise").

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Hesione, the daught of King Laomedon of Troy, and the sister of Priamus.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Avarus et Poma Marcescentia, a funny story about a miser and his rotten apples.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Perdix et Galli, the story of a partridge and some quarrelsome roosters.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Fures et Rusticus, a hilarious story about a farmer who could not trust his own eyes, and Oculi et Mel, the story of the eyes who wanted to enjoy the sweetness of honey.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Allen's edition of Tacitus's Agricola and Germany and Hime's Latin Language Syntax .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Nihil nimium cupio (English: I desire nothing too much).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Aquilam noctuae comparas (English: You are comparing an eagle to an owl).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Post vinum verba, post imbrem nascitur herba (English: After wine come words, as grass grows after the rain).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Melior est pugillus cum requie quam plena utraque manus cum labore (Ecc. 4:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Homo bulla: Man is but a bubble, or bladder of the water. As who shuld say nothing is more frayle, more fugitive, more slight than the life of man. If ye require the Englishe Proverbe, it is this, Today a man, tomorow none.

For an image today, here is a medieval illustration of Hercules rescuing Hesione: Tot malis remedium quaesivit Laomedon; oraculo consulto, responsum est placandos Apollinem ac Neptunum, obiecta monstris marinis Troiana quotannis virgine. Sors Hesionem, regis ipsius filiam, neci addixerat; Hercules ita se liberaturum illam spopondit, si Laomedon quosdam insignes equos sibi daret. Promisit rex; at liberata filia, monstris abactis et interfectis, Herculem indonatum irrisumque valere iussit. Hercules, iusto furore percitus, obsedit urbem, cepit, ac regem interfecit. (source)

Saturday, July 9, 2011

Round-Up: July 9

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Idus Iulias.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 35 (1701-1750), and Scala 36 (1751-1800). Here's a good one: Populus vult decipi, ergo decipiatur, "The people want to be fooled, so let them be fooled" (a great saying to keep in mind when contemplating the debacle of the modern mass media).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is CORAM - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Non maledices surdo, nec coram caeco pones offendiculum, "You shall not insult a deaf man, nor place a stumbling block in the way of a blind man."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Daphne et Hyacinthus, the story of two of Apollo's lovers.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Iuppiter et Apollo, a story where Apollo suffers some public humiliation amongst the gods.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Bos Laborans et Vitula , the story of a hard-working ox and a carefree heifer.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Hedera et Murus, the story of some aggressive ivy, and Salix et Cunei, the story of a wretched willow tree.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Hime's Latin Accidence and Prosody and Kelsey's Select Orations and Letters of Cicero .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Fuge magna (English: Flee from great things).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Post nubila sol (English: After clouds, the sun).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Invenit interdum caeca columba pisum (English: Sometimes a blind pigeon finds a pea).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Sapientia vino obumbratur (English: Wisdom is overshadowed by wine).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Lampon iurat per anserem (English: Lampon swears by the goose; from Adagia 4.1.34 - Lampon was a proverbial priest who would swear "by the goose," rather than invoking a god, since if Lampon later broke the oath, he could do so with impunity, since the wrath of the goose is not something to fear).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐλέφαντα ἐκ μυιᾶς ποιεῖς (English: You are making an elephant out of a mouse - something like making a mountain out of a molehill).

For an image today, here is a famous depiction of Apollo and Daphne by the Renaissance painter, Pollaiolo: Daphne in laurum ab Apolline mutata fuit.

Friday, July 8, 2011

Special Edition: My Week with a Standing Desk!

UPDATE: It is now about three months later (and about 20 pounds lighter, ha ha) - and I am even more convinced about the power of standing desks! :-)

Since it is Friday, I thought I would take this chance to report on an exciting new experiment which I began this week: I'm using a standing desk! In fact, I am standing while I write this blog post.

As you can all probably guess, I spend every day in front of my computer, both during the school year when I am teaching online and during the summer when I am working on projects. My genius husband had decided some months ago that he wanted to switch to a standing desk, based on factors like the ones you can read about in this New York Times article: Stand Up While You Read This. He did lots of research and concluded that our best option was a Conset desk to be purchased from ErgoDepot.com. And here's the serendipity factor... when he talked to the folks at ErgoDepot out in Oregon, it turned out that the Conset America office is right here in North Carolina, just an hour's drive from where we live. So the nice folks at Conset (thank you, Cindy and Kate!) invited us to come into the shop and see the desks in action. I wasn't sure I wanted to get one myself, but as soon as I saw how easy it was to raise and lower the desk, I knew this was something I had to try!

And... WOW... it has been even better than I expected. Standing up, at least for me, completely changes how I feel while I am working. It makes me want to move around and stretch and even dance to the music (my office is at home, so I am not driving any officemates crazy by bouncing around). Plus, I am getting the full benefit of my big monitor now that I can really adjust the desk height - I wear trifocals, so finding the "sweet spot" where my eyes can focus right on the monitor is such a big plus for me! As I get used to standing (my goal is to be standing all day by the time school starts in August), I just raise and lower the desk as needed - a low position is perfect for me when sitting (short person that I am), and there are basically two different standing heights I use, depending on whether I am doing more reading on the monitor or whether I am mostly just using the keyboard and mouse. I thought I would need something to adjust the monitor height separately, but not at all - my monitor stand has a tilt option that has allowed me to find just the right combination of desk height and monitor angle for everything I have been working on this week.

Apparently, it's not just me who feels this way - here's a quote from a different NYTimes article, Can't Stand to Sit Too Long? There's a Desk for That, that conveys exactly what I have experienced this week myself:
I suspect that this is because when you’re standing, you feel a bit unchained from your desk. If I got stuck on a word or sentence as I wrote, I found myself shaking my arms, bouncing on my feet or stepping away from the desk for a bit — things I couldn’t do in a chair. Often, the antsy-ness seemed to relax my mind enough for me to get over my creative hurdle.
Exactly my experience: I just feel less "stuck" with anything I am working on while standing, but at the same time I feel much more focused. I guess all those millions of years of evolution that got us to stand up on our hind legs were also busy making our brains feel good about that, too!

Anyway, I thought I would write about this in the blog here since probably there are some of you out there who are also in front of a computer monitor all day - and this might be something you want to try. Already in the first week, I am standing about 4-5 hours per day without any problem at all - it feels great, in fact! I'll report back in a few weeks about my progress towards my goal of standing all day. Meanwhile, here are some pictures - first, I'll embed the video from Conset that shows a desk in action, and then below the video is a picture of my own desk, lowered on the left and raised on the right.

Are any of you out there using a standing desk solution already? Feel free to chime in with comments... and not to worry: the regular Bestiaria will be back on Saturday morning! :-)



Thursday, July 7, 2011

Round-Up: July 7

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: Nonae Iuliae, the Nones of July.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 31 (1501-1550), Scala 32 (1551-1600), Scala 33 (1601-1650), and Scala 34 (1651-1700). Here's a thought-provoking one: Amici sunt fures temporis, "Friends are thieves of time."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is VALEO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Quae non valeant singula, iuncta iuvant, "Things which are not effective singly are helpful when joined together."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Aesculapius, the story of the son of Apollo.

FABULAE FACILES: The easy-to-read fable for today is Delphinus et Pisciculus, a story of marine revenge.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Rubus et Ovis, the story of the sheep seeking shelter from a storm.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Quercus et Glires, the wonderful story of the dormice and the oak tree, and Scarabaeus Alte Volans, the story of the high-flying beetle.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Kelsey's edition of Cicero's de Senectute & de Amicitia and Jackson's Law Latin .

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Non desistam (English: I will not stop).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Repetitio mater memoriae (English: Repetition is the mother of memory)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Non faciunt meliorem equum aurei freni (English: Golden reins do not make a better horse). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quam malus est, culpam qui suam alterius facit (English: How wicked is the man who blames someone else for his own fault).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Aquilam testudo vincit (English: The turtle beats the eagle; from Adagia 1.7.68 - and you can read the Aesop's fable here: Testudo et Aquila, Certantes).

For an image today, here is the god, Aesculapius: Apollinis filius Aesculapius, cum artem medicam a patre et Chirone Centauro didicisset, tantum in ea profecit, ut Hippolytum, Thesei filium, a monstris marinis discerptum, ad vitam revocaret. Quo facto Iupiter, auctoritatem suam laedi ratus, Aesculapium fulmine percussit. (source)

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Round-Up: July 5

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. There are notices also at Twitter -look for Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Nonas Iulias.

SCALA SAPIENTIAE: The latest rungs on the Scala are Scala 27 (1301-1350), Scala 28 (1351-1400), Scala 29 (1401-1450), and Scala 30 (1451-1500). Here's a fun one: Nullum mendacium sine teste, "No lie lacks a witness."

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is QUASI - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Laudatur nummus, quasi rex super omnia summus, "Money is praised as if it were the highest king over all."

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Argus, the story of the hundred-eyed monster.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Puer et Paedagogus, the story of a boy in desperate trouble and his very unhelpful teacher.

MILLE FABULAE: FABLE OF THE DAY: The fable for today is Asinus, Gallus, et Leo, the story of an overly audacious donkey.

MILLE FABULAE: ILLUSTRATIONS: The latest fables with images are Apes et Agricola, a fable about the bee and its sting, and Serpens et Rosa, a story about a serpent carrying a rose in its mouth.

GOOGLE BOOKS: Today's Google Books are Nunn's An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin and Underwood's edition of Celsus, Books I-IV.

DISTICHA: Today's little poems are Vive Deo gratus, toti mundo tumulatus, / Pectore pacatus, semper transire paratus. (from Wegeler) and Quam primum rapienda tibi est occasio prima, / Ne rursus quaeras quae iam neglexeris ante. (from Cato's distichs).

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at Schoolhouse Widgets.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Sub pondere cresco (English: Beneath my burden, I grow).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Diversi diversa putant (English: Different people think different things).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Est facies testis, quales intrinsecus estis (English: The face provides evidence of what you are inwardly).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Beatius est magis dare quam accipere (Acts 20:35). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Muli mutuum scabunt: Mules do gnap or rubbe one another. A proverbe applied to persons ill and defamed, when one of them doth prayse the other.

Today's image is Argus: Interim Iuno maritum in pellicum amores turpiter effusum observans, illi custodem apposuit centum oculis praeditum, Argum nomine. Molestum observatorem Iupiter, opera Mercurii, obtruncavit; eius oculos Iuno indidit pavonis caudae. Argum ipsum, ut alii volunt, in pavonem mutavit. (source) - here is a depiction of Mercury killing Argus: