Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Myths and Legends: Diana and Endymion

Diana and Endymion. To find out more about Endymion and the moon goddess Diana, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Diana (Artemis) is the goddess associated with the moon, and Endymion was the moon's lover. The moon asked Zeus to grant Endymion eternal youth so that he could be her lover forever; to accomplish this, Zeus put Endymion into an everlasting sleep so that the moon (or Artemis or Diana) could visit him every night as she traveled overhead in the sky. You may know the opening lines of Keats' famous poem, Endymion:
A thing of beauty is a joy for ever;
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 26 - September 1 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Monday, August 30, 2010

Myths and Legends: Atlas and Heracles

Atlas and Heracles. To find out more about the Titan Atlas, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

The Titan Atlas was condemned to carry the cosmos on his shoulders as a punishment; he joined with the other Titans in their war against the Olympians and when the Olympians won that war, Zeus chose this particular punishment for Atlas. At one point, Atlas got Heracles to bear the heavens for him instead but Heracles tricked Atlas into taking the cosmos back on his shoulders again ("just for a minute," according to Heracles, who claimed he only wanted to put his cloak upon on his shoulders as padding) - and Atlas has been holding up the celestial sphere ever since.

You can recognize Heracles because he is wearing his famous lion skin:




You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 26 - September 1 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.


Round-Up: August 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

I spent this weekend cleaning up the various blogs and getting them more interconnected, focusing on the blogs that I will be actively publishing now that the regular routine of the school year has settled in! If you have not visited the actual blog page lately, take a look - these new Blogger.com templates are really nice, I think!

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is MEUS - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay - with very nice rhyme: Ultra posse meum non reor esse reum, "I do not think I can be guilty of something beyond my abilities."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include a new random fable widget illustrated with images and lots more illustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Mulus et Equus, a fable praising the simple, hard-working life.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Canis et Leo, a fable about the value of freedom.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange, with his absolutely charming 17th-century prose: Old Lion, Ass and Whelp, City Mouse and Country Mouse, Lion A Hunting and Dog and Shadow.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Tenax propositi (English: Firm of purpose - and that third declension adjective is good for a man's motto, or a woman's).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Flamma fumo proxima (English: The flame is near the smoke - or, as say in English, where there's smoke, there's fire)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Maluisses cloacas Augeae purgare (English: You would have preferred to clean the sewers of Augeas). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Necessitas ab homine, quae vult, impetrat (English: What necessity wants from someone, she takes).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Leonis exuvium super crocoton (English: A lion skin over an evening gown; from Adagia 3.5.98 - this is a proverbial mismatch, alluding to Dionysus's attempt to pretend to be Heracles in the underworld, as recounted in Aristophanes's The Frogs).

Today's image is an illustration from a hand-colored edition of Steinhowel, showing the proud horse before he comes to destruction; see the link to the simple fable above.

Equus Superbus et Asinus

Sunday, August 29, 2010

Myths and Legends: Cupid and Psyche

Cupid and Psyche Embracing. To find out more about the story of Cupid and Psyche, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This sculpture by Antonio Canova shows a happy moment in the love story of Cupid and Psyche. You can see these other images from the Cupid and Psyche story: the moment when Cupid first discovers Psyche, and the moment when Psyche learns Cupid's identity - and at that moment, of course, she loses him. Only after many trials and challenges is Psyche able to be reunited with her beloved, as you see here.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 26 - September 1 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Friday, August 27, 2010

Myths and Legends: The Death of Procris

The Death of Procris. To find out more about the tragic story of Procris and Cephalus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This painting by Piero di Cosimo shows the sad death of Procris, the wife of Cephalus; as she lies dead, slain by an arrow, she is being mourned by a Satyr, one of the woodland's inhabitants. Due to her husband's long absence, she had become convinced that he had taken a lover. When she ambushed him in the woods, Cephalus mistook her for a deer and shot her with an arrow. There are other versions of the story, but things never end well for poor Procris.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 26 - September 1 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: August 27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is QUAERO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Quaerendo invenietis., "By seeking, you will find."

Mille Fabulae et Una: Here are the latest things I've been posting over at the 1001 Fabulae site... and you can download your free PDF copy of the book, too.

Bestiaria Latina Podcast: Today's Latin audio fable is Pater et Filii Litigantes - and it's also an easy-to-read fable!

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Dum vivo, spero (English: So long as I live, I hope).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Nummus nummum parit (English: Money makes money).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Quid iuvat adspectus, si non conceditur usus? (English: What is the good of looking at something, if you're not allowed to use it?).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Moritur doctus, similiter et indoctus (Ecc. 2:16). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Canina facundia: Doggishe or currishe eloquence. A proverbe applyed to suche as do never exercise there tongue or penne but in reproving or blamyng other menne.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from Cato's Distichs, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Multorum disce exemplo, quae facta sequaris,
Quae fugias: vita est nobis aliena magistra.
English: "Learn by the example of many people which deeds to imitate, and which to avoid; another person's life is our teacher." What a great statement about learning by both positive and negative exempla!

Today's image is Walter Crane's illustration for the captured trumpeter: 864. Tubicen Captus. Tubicen, ab hostibus captus, “Ne me,” inquit, “interficite; nam inermis sum, neque quidquam habeo praeter hanc tubam.” At hostes “Propter hoc ipsum,” inquiunt, “te interimemus quod, cum ipse pugnandi sis imperitus, alios ad pugnam incitare soles.”

Tubicen Captivus

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Myths & Legends: Aug. 26 - Sept. 1

Aug. 19-25 - Aug. 26 - Sept. 1 - Sept. 2-8

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

The Death of Sarpedon. To find out more about Sarpedon, the son of Zeus and Laodamia, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Death of Procris. To find out more about the tragic story of Procris and Cephalus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Birth of Athena. To find out more about Athena and her birth from the head of Zeus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Cupid and Psyche Embracing. To find out more about the story of Cupid and Psyche, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Atlas and Heracles. To find out more about the Titan Atlas, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Diana and Endymion. To find out more about Endymion and the moon goddess Diana, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Heracles and Cerberus. To find out more about the labors of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Myths and Legends: Orpheus and Eurydice

Orpheus and Eurydice. To find out more about Orpheus and Eurydice, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This beautiful painting by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot shows Orpheus leading his bride, Eurydice, out of the Underworld, returning her from the land of the dead to the land of the living. He is forbidden to look back - but as the sad story goes, he could not resist taking a backward glance, and so he lost his Eurydice forever.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 19-25 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-up: August 25

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

Mille Fabulae et Una: Here are the latest things I've been posting over at the 1001 Fabulae site... and you can download your free PDF copy of the book, too.

Bestiaria Latina Podcast: Today's Latin audio fable is Canis in Praesepe et Bos.

Imagines: There are LOTS of new fables with images - you can see the latest illustrated fables here.

Fabulae Faciles: The new easy-to-read fable is Cervus et Cornua Eius.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Errando discitur (English: Learning comes through mistakes).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ex unitate incrementum (English: From unity, increase).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Quaelibet vulpes caudam suam laudat (English: Every fox praises her own tail).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Medice, cura teipsum (English: Physician, heal yourself).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Dente Theonino rodi (English: To be gnawed by Theon's tooth; from Adagia 2.2.55 - Theon was a grammarian at Rome who was notoriously mean-spirited and critical).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸ ἐν τῇ καρδία τοῦ νήφοντος, ἐν τῇ γλώσσῃ τοῦ μεθύοντος (English: What is in the heart of a soberman springs to his tongue when he is drunk).

Today's image is a great illustration of the story of the donkey in the lion-skin and the fox: 56. Vulpes et Asinus Pelle Leonis Indutus: Asinus, pelle leonis indutus, per nemora, reliqua bruta perterrens, vagabatur. Vulpe autem conspecta, ipsi quoque timorem iniicere conatus est. Sed haec, ubi casu eius vocem audivit, “Scias velim,” inquit, “quod et ego te sane pertimuissem, nisi rudentem audivissem.” (image source)

Monday, August 23, 2010

Round-Up: August 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

Mille Fabulae et Una: Here are the latest things I've been posting over at the 1001 Fabulae site... and you can download your free PDF copy of the book, too.

Fabulae cum Imaginibus: I've added so many fables with images to the blog this weekend. There are over 100 of them now. You can find fables with illustrations from a hand-colored Steinhowel, from Billinghurt's La Fontaine, Bennett's Aesop, Arthur Rackham, Milo Winter, Griset, and Sebastian Brant's Aesop, too!

Bestiaria Latina Podcast: Today's Latin audio fable is Adolescens Piger, Poggio's story of the lazy boy.

Fabulae Faciles: The new easy-to-read fable is Lupus Ovis Pelle Indutus.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Mente manuque praesto (English: I am ready with mind and hand - although I guess it would be better to say "heart and hand" or "head and hand" to capture the alliteration of the Latin!).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Mortalia facta peribunt (English: Mortal deeds will perish - that's the thing about mortality, after all!).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Non vult verna probus dominis servire duobus (English: The honest slave will not serve two masters).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Resistite diabolo et fugiet a vobis (James 4:7). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Grata brevitas: Shortnes is acceptable. Unto littel thinges is a certaine grace annexed. Some thinges do please men by reason of the greatnes and quantitie. Againe there be other thinges whiche even for that very cause be acceptable, and had in price, bycause they be litle. The English proverbe is thus pronounced, Short and swete. .

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from the rhyming couplets collected by Wegeler, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
In mensa residens et panem non benedicens,
Ille sedet quasi sus et surget sicut asellus.
English: "Someone who takes his place at the table and doesn't say grace over the food is like a hog sitting down and like a donkey he will rise up." So, in other words, give thanks for your food, unlike those barnyard animals.

For an image, here is Milo Winter's illustration for the story of the squealing pig, 302. Oves et Sus: Suculus, in quemdam ovium gregem ingressus, cum iis una pascebatur. Olim vero a pastore prehensus, grunnitus magnos edebat atque effugere omni vi nitebatur. Eum itaque oves ob tot tantosque clamores increpare coeperunt, aientes, “Nos quoque continuo pastor manu prehendit, nec tamen ita clamamus.” Quibus tum suculus “Non vestrae similis,” ait, “captura mea est. Vos enim aut propter lanam aut propter agnos, me vero ob carnem tantummodo capit.”

Sus, Ovis et Capra

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Myths and Legends: The Birth of Heracles

The Birth of Heracles. To find out more about Alcmena's delivery of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This is one of my favorite stories from the ancient world, famously told by Ovid in his Metamorphoses. Hera was not at all happy about Alcmena giving birth to Zeus's child, and she did everything in her power to thwart the birth. Alcmena, though, had a loyal servant who managed to trick the goddess and thus allow Heracles to be born. The infuriated Hera then turned the servant, whose name was Galanthis, into a weasel (who is called "gale" in Greek, γαλῆ).

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 19-25 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Round-Up: August 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

Mille Fabulae et Una: Here are the latest things I've been posting over at the 1001 Fabulae site... and you can download your free PDF copy of the book, too.
Bestiaria Latina Podcast: Today's Latin audio fable is Leo Amatorius et Silvanus.

1001 Fables in English: Today's English fable is The Lion in Love.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Meliora speranda (English: Better things can be hoped for - that could be a good motto for the start of the new school year!).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Necessitas artis magistra (English: Necessity is the teacher of skill)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Medico male est, si nemini male est (English: The doctor's bad off, if nobody is bad off). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Incertus animus dimidium est sapientiae (English: A mind that doubts is halfway to wisdom - another great motto to keep in mind throughout the school year!).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Ululas Athenas (English: You're carrying owls to Athens; from Adagia 1.2.11 - the ornithological equivalent to "carrying coals to Newcastle").

Today's image is one of those great Bennett images - this one is his illustration for the story of the lamb and the wolf: Lupus et agnus, siti compulsi, ad eundem rivum venerant. Superior lupus, longe inferior agnus stabat. Tunc improbus latro, iurgii causam quaerens, “Cur,” inquit, “aquam mihi bibenti turbulentam fecisti?” Agnus, perterritus, “Quomodo,” inquit, “hoc facere possum? Aqua a te ad me decurrit.” Lupus, veritate rei repulsus, “Sex menses abhinc,” inquit, “mihi maledixisti.” “Illo tempore,” respondit agnus, “equidem nondum natus eram.” “Hercle igitur,” inquit lupus, “pater tuus de me male locutus est!” Atque ita correptum agnum dilaniat (image source).

Agnus et Lupus

Friday, August 20, 2010

Myths and Legends: The Flight of Aeneas

The Flight of Aeneas. To find out more about Aeneas and his flight from Troy, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This painting by Lionello Spada shows the dramatic moment when Aeneas prepares to flee Troy, which has fallen to the Greeks. Aeneas is accompanied by his wife Creusa and his son Ascanius, and also his father Anchises whom he is carrying on his shoulders; Anchises, meanwhile, is carrying the family's household gods.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 19-25 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: August 20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. Thanks again, everybody, for your patience while I finished up the book!

HODIE: ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

Mille Fabulae et Una: Here are the latest things I've been posting over at the 1001 Fabulae site... and you can download your free PDF copy of the book, too. I've mostly been working on adding image slideshows to the blog, in order to accumulate images to use in illustrating all those 1001 fables! Here are the slideshows I've added most recently:
There are some more slideshows you can see at the blog, too! Here's a link to all the slideshows.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Memorem mones (English: You are warning someone who is already mindful).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Spe labor levis (English: With hope, hard work becomes easy).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Macilenti pediculi acrius mordent (English: The lean lice bite more sharply).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Qui gladio ferit, gladio perit (English: He who wounds by the sword dies by the sword).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Non est cuiuslibet Corinthum appellere (English: It's not for every man to make a trip to Corinth; from Adagia 1.4.1).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πολλὰ μεταξὺ πέλει κύλικος καὶ χείλεος ἄκρου (English: This is the Greek equivalent of that famous English saying, "There's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip" - which is to say, you cannot predict the future, even in the smallest degree!).

Today's image is from the McLoughlin album - it's the story of the dog in the manger: 357. In praesepi faeni pleno decumbebat canis. Venit bos ut comedat faenum, cum canis, confestim sese erigens, tota voce elatravit. Cui bos, “Dii te, cum ista tua invidia, perdant,” inquit, “nec enim faeno ipse vesceris, nec me vesci sines.”

Thursday, August 19, 2010

Myths & Legends: August 19-25


For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Horatius Cocles. To find out more about the Roman hero Horatius Cocles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Flight of Aeneas. To find out more about Aeneas and his flight from Troy, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Romulus. To find out more about Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Birth of Heracles. To find out more about Alcmena's delivery of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Pan and Syrinx. To find out more about Pan's pursuit of the nymph Syrinx, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Telemachus, Menelaus, and Helen. To find out more about the life of Helen after the Trojan War, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Orpheus and Eurydice. To find out more about Orpheus and Eurydice, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Myths and Legends: Orestes and the Furies

Orestes and the Furies. To find out more about Orestes, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

After Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus murdered Clytemnestra's husband, Agamemnon, their son, Orestes, murdered Clytemnestra and Aegisthus in revenge. According to the version of the story told by Aeschylus, Orestes then went mad and was tormented by the Erinyes (Furies) for his crime. You can read more about Aeschylus and his "Oresteia" cycle of plays in this Wikipedia article. The painting of Orestes and the Furies below is by John Singer Sargent.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 12-18 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE

I've now had a chance to see an actual printed copy of the book, and it looks good to me! In fact, I am really happy with it: I wanted to use an easy-to-read font with a fairly large font size and reader-friendly layout - and it seems to have worked out really nicely.

So, for anybody who is interested in reading any of the fables - just 1 or 10 or 100 or all 1001 of them - you can get a printed copy of the book from Lulu.com ($19.95 paperback), or you can download a free PDF copy of the book (the PDF is an exact copy of the printed book). I hope you will all enjoy it, and please let me know what you think by leaving a comment!



Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Back in action: August 17

My apologies for the unexpected hiatus, everybody - and thanks for the emails from those of you who wrote to ask! What happened was that towards the end of July, I started to realize that I was at risk of not finishing the book this summer after all... but here is the good news: I finished the book! All 441 pages of it! :-)

So, on Wednesday (tomorrow) I will be receiving a first printed copy from the publishers. If that looks good, I will be able to publish the online copy of the PDF for anyone to download, totally for free - it is my great pleasure to be able to give this book away, since I am my own publisher! If I need to do a second printed copy to fix up any remaining layout errors, then I will have to wait another week or so to release the PDF copy, since I want to make sure that the PDF copy I'm distributing online is an exact match of the printed copy of the book, which will be available at Lulu.com. Even though the book is huge, I was able to keep the Lulu.com price at $19.95, which made me really happy to see - I've never published such a big book before!

Hopefully, then, I will be announcing the PDF copy of the book tomorrow - and if not tomorrow, then by September 1. Meanwhile, though, the website that accompanies the book is ready to go, so for today's post I thought I would give you a quick tour of that website - just go to BestLatin.net, and you will be redirected automatically to the blog: Bestiaria Latina: Mille Fabulae et Una.

Here are the main things you will find there:

Random 1001 Fables. In the right-hand sidebar, the first thing you will see is a new widget that displays the 1001 fables from the book at random. You can add this random script to your own webpage or blog; here's how.

Indexes. Since the book is already enormously large (320 pages of fables, 100 pages of notes, plus 20 pages of overview material), I decided to publish the indexes online instead of trying to add another 100 pages to the book. So, you will find the Animal Index, Nature & Things Index, Gods & Supernatural Beings Index and the Proper Names Index. In addition, there are "reverse indexes" so that you can search for a specific Perry number using the Perry Index, and you can also see which fables come from which source using the Source (Author) Index.

Original Texts. Most importantly, you can look up the original source I used for every fable online, since all the books I used - even the Renaissance books - are available online! So, for all 1001 fables in the book, you can find Links to the Original Sources.

Bibliography and Overview. For convenience, I have also copied the Bibliography and Overview sections of the book so that they are quickly available online at the website.

Images. The book itself does not have images, so one of the important tasks of this blog will be to provide images to go with the fables! After years of accumulating illustrations to the fables, I am finally sorting them out into albums at Flickr.com, as you can see in these first posts that I have done, where I have an image to go with the fable, along with a slideshow for the book of illustrations as well, so that you can see the artist's overall approach to the fables, in addition to that specific illustration. So far, I have organized my Herrick, Barlow and Crane illustrations. I should be able to make a dozen or so of these albums during the coming years using images I already have on file.

Audio. Just recently I discovered a web-based service called iPadio which allows you to record something just by making a telephone call and have it published online. This was really exciting for me; I have so little time during the school year to work on Latin (since I teach English composition, not Latin). With iPadio, though, I think this will allow me to do some audio. I added audio to Herrick's illustration of the Wolf and the Sow - it just took a couple of minutes. So, let me know what you think. The audio quality is not as good as I would get by recording and editing the audio on my computer and publishing the MP3 file myself - but since I don't have time to do that anyway, this seems like a fun alternative. It's weird and quite delightful to call up a phone number and have your voice be broadcast online like that (they call it "phlogging" apparently). If you are interested in giving iPadio a try, here are the instructions I wrote up for my students, since I think they are going to like this online tool very much!

So, with apologies again for the hiatus, that is what I have been up to! I barely managed to get all this done before my classes started yesterday - but now that the book is being printed and my classes are off to a good start, I should get back on the normal blogging schedule here at the Bestiaria blog on Wednesday - hopefully with an announcement about the book's availability but, either way, I'll have the proverbs back in action. With audio, too - I'll see if I can do an iPadio audio for the blog. Fun stuff! If you have suggestions or ideas for the Mille Fabulae et Una website, too, let me know! :-)

Monday, August 16, 2010

Myths and Legends: Theseus and the Minotaur

Theseus and the Minotaur. To find out more about the half-man half-bull Minotaur, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Here you see the hero Theseus slaying the half-man half-bull Minotaur. You might want to look at some other "myths and legends" blog posts about The Birth of the Minotaur, The Labyrinth (where the Minotaur lived), and this quite different depiction of Theseus and the Minotaur in a neo-classical painting.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 12-18 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Saturday, August 14, 2010

Myths and Legends: Hylas and the Nymphs

Hylas and the Nymphs. To find out more about Hylas, the lover of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Poor Hylas was a beautiful young prince, and he served Heracles as his arms bearer. When Heracles decided to accompany Jason on the voyage of the Argo with the other Argonauts, he took Hylas with him. At one of their stops, Hylas was kidnapped by the nymphs, as you can see here in the mosaic. Heracles called and called and called for Hylas, but there was no answer. Finally the Argo sailed away, leaving Hylas behind. Heracles was heartbroken. The grief of Heracles became proverbial: Hylam vocas, "You're calling for Hylas," was a proverbial expression that you meant you were calling out for something in vain, something or someone who is lost to you forever.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 12-18 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Myths & Legends: August 12-18

Aug. 5-11 - Aug. 12-18 - Aug. 19-25

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Odysseus and Circe. To find out more about Circe, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Europa and the Bull. To find out more about Europa, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Hylas and the Nymphs. To find out more about Hylas, the lover of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Aeneas and the Harpies. To find out more about the Harpies, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Theseus and the Minotaur. To find out more about the half-man half-bull Minotaur, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Daedalus and Icarus. To find out more about the fall of Icarus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Orestes and the Furies. To find out more about Orestes, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Myths and Legends: Odysseus and Circe

Odysseus and Circe. To find out more about Circe, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Today's image is a captivating depiction of Odysseus and Circe - with Odysseus' companions in their animal forms. Marvelous! It comes from the Nuremberg Chronicle. This is an English translation (which I found online here) of the accompanying text:
"When Ulysses [Ulixes] (as Augustinus and Boecius write) returned from the Trojan War he travelled ten years over the sea and finally came to Italy next to Sicily to an island, there lived Circe, the black sorceress, a very beautiful woman, who was called the daughter of the sun. She made by her skill and sorcery a drink by which - according to her intention - all who drank from it were transformed from human nature into beastlike shape. Now she handed this drink to the companions of Ulysses and turned so one of them into a wild pig, this into a lion, the other into a stag. But Mercurius has given Ulysses a flower which served against such skill and sorcery. And because she couldn't do harm to him he compelled her with his bare sword to bring his companions to their former shape. Solinus writes: This Ulysses has built the city of Olissipo [Lisbon] in Spain and called after him."
Ulysses is indeed holding the flower in his hand, as you can see here:


You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 12-18 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Myths and Legends: Odysseus and the Shades

Odysseus and the Shades. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey among the dead, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This dramatic illustration for Homer's Odyssey is by John Flaxman (1755–1826). It shows Odysseus besieged by the spirits of the dead. The scene is from Book XI of the Odyssey; here's a link to Tony Kline's English translation online.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 5 - August 11 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths and Legends Widget Reference Page.

Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Myths and Legends: Deucalion and Pyrrha

Deucalion and Pyrrha. To find out more about the great Flood, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Today's image depicts the creation of humankind by Deucalion and Pyrrha, his wife. After surviving the great Flood, they found themselves alone in the world. An oracle told them to cover their heads and throw the bones of their mother behind their shoulders. They concluded that their mother was Gaia, the earth, and her bones must be stones, so they hefted up stones and threw them over their shoulders. The stones thrown by Pyrrha gave rise to women, and those thrown by Deucalion gave rise to men.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 5 - August 11 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Sunday, August 8, 2010

Myths and Legends: Orpheus and the Animals

Orpheus and the Animals. To find out more about Orpheus, the legendary poet and musician, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Orpheus was the great singer and musician of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds; his playing was able to captivate not only humans, but also animals, as you can see in this second-century Roman mosaic from Edessa in what is now southeastern Turkey.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 5 - August 11 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Friday, August 6, 2010

Myths and Legends: Aeneas and Turnus

Aeneas and Turnus. To find out more about Aeneas and his rival Turnus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Many people focus on the wandering adventures of Aeneas in Books 1-6 of the Aeneid, but the scene in today's image is from the second half of the Aeneid, when Aeneas goes to war in Italy, with Turnus, the king of the Rutuli, as his greatest foe. Turnus had been courting Lavinia, the daughter of King Latinus, but when Lavinia is betrothed to the newly-arrived Aeneas instead, Turnus declares war. Aeneas finally kills Turnus in the climactic fight which you can read about in Book 12 of the Aeneid.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of August 5 - August 11 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Thursday, August 5, 2010

Myths & Legends: August 5-11


For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Agamemnon Leads Away Briseis. To find out more about Briseis, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Aeneas and Turnus. To find out more about Aeneas and his rival Turnus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Constellation of Gemini. To find out more about the twin gods Castor and Pollux, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Orpheus and the Animals. To find out more about Orpheus, the legendary poet and musician, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Palinurus. To find out more about Palinurus, the companion of Aeneas, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Deucalion and Pyrrha. To find out more about the great Flood, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Odysseus and the Shades. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey among the dead, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.