Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Round-Up: September 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. This is another of the iambic fables of Desbillons - a whole little story in just four lines, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com!
Pugnam parabat inire cum Tauro Canis;
Et, Facile vincam, dixit; namque dentibus
Sum longe melior. Capite sed prono irruens
Hunc fodit ille nec-opinantem cornibus.
English: "A dog was preparing to enter into battle with a bull. The dog said: I'll easily win, since I'm far better at biting. But the bull rushed at him head first and gored him with horns, much to the dog's surprise!" So, in just a few lines you have there a fine little fable about not overestimating your own abilities vis-à-vis (so to speak, ha ha) those of your enemy.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion moves us on from the Clodius scandal to a new figure of interest: Crassus! Caesar statim ex praetura prouinciam nactus Hispaniam, quum foeneratores debitum exigentes molesteque profecturum urgentes atque conuiciantes placare non posset, ad Crassum confugit, Romanorum ditissimum et qui uigore ac uehementia Caesaris indigeret ob dissensionem cum Pompeio.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today: Qui non laborat, non manducat (English: He who does not work does not eat).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Assidua stilla saxum excavat (English: The persistent drip wears through stone). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Ratione, non vi vincenda adulescentia est (English: Youth must be tamed by reason, not by force - yes, even the ancient Romans would endorse the wonderful article about rational self-control for kids in New York Times this weekend).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Exitus ostendit quo mundi gloria tendit (English: The end shows where the glory of the world goes - I even made it rhyme in English this time, ha ha).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Ait latro ad latronem (English: One thief is speaking to another... in which case honest people better watch out, because the thieves are bound to agree amongst themselves, at our cost!).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Respice, prospice (English: Look back, look ahead - a wonderful motto of situational awareness).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Pulchre, bene, recte (English: Nicely, well, rightly - although the adverb "well" breaks the charm of the pattern in English).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Faenum agri hodie est, et cras in clibanum mittitur (Matt. 6:30). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is In pace leones, in proelio cervi (English: Lions in peace, deer in battle - and deer were proverbially faint of heart; in English, we might say "scaredy-cats").

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀφροδίτῃ ὗν τέθυκεν (English: He's sacrificed a sow to Aphrodite... which is a big mistake: Aphrodite has had no fondness for any kind of pig ever since a boar killed her beloved Adonis!).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Lupus et Canis, the wonderful fable in praise of liberty!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE RANIS ET EARUM REGE, another story about liberty - this time about frogs who foolishly thought having a king was preferable to their freedom.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Frustra saxum volvit Sisyphus. (English: Sisyphus rolls his rock in vain... alluding to the famous punishment of Sisyphus in the underworld). Here's an image of Sisyphus and his rock from a 6th-century B.C.E. vase painting:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Round-Up: September 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. Today's poem is one of Wegeler's little rhymes, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Irritare canem noli dormire volentem,
Nec moveas iram post tempora longa latentem.
English: "Do not bother a dog who is wanting to sleep, and do not stir up anger that has long been hidden." A very elegant Latin expression of the advice to let sleeping dogs lie.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion contains a great reference to bad handwriting, confusis literis, in the ancient world: Absolutus quidem est Clodius, quum plerique iudices (ne, si condemnassent, in periculo uersarentur apud plebem; sin absoluissent, in infamia apud optimates essent) confusis literis tulissent sententias.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about making statues of the gods: Non ex quovis trunco fieri potest Mercurius (English: You can't make a Mercury from just any block of wood).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Cancri numquam recte ingrediuntur (English: Crabs never walk straight). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Bonus vir nemo est, nisi qui bonus est omnibus (English: No one is good unless he is good to everyone).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Contra vim mortis non est medicamen in hortis (English: Against the power of death there is no remedy in the garden).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cecinimus vobis, et non saltastis (English: We sang for you, and you did not dance - a saying Polydorus took from the Gospel of Matthew).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Ubique patria (English: Home is everywhere - a very cosmopolitan motto!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Optima sperando spiro (English: By hoping for the best things, I breathe - a nice variation on the famous saying, dum spiro, spero).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Tepidus es et nec frigidus nec calidus (Rev. 3:16). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Sub omni lapide scorpius dormit (English: There's a scorpion sleeping under every rock... so: watch out!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is In mediis sitiens stat Tantalus undis (English: Tantalus stands thirsting in the middle of the water - an allusion to the proverbial punishment of Tantalus in the underworld).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸν τρέχοντα ἐρέθιζε (English: Spur on the one running - which is to say, even if the horse is already running spur him on even faster).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Canis et Bovis, the famous story of the dog in the manger.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE HERINACEIS VIPERAS HOSPITES EIICIENTIBUS, the story about the hedgehogs and the vipers which Barlow has illustrated with porcupines, as you can see here:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Round-Up: September 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

NOVITAS: You will see that I have a new widget premiering today: a selection from the maxims of Publilius Syrus. This is my third proverb widget with the English translations included. Since Publilius's maxims are not often metaphorical, it was a bit easier to render them in English than with some of the other proverb collections!

HODIE: ante diem quartum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. It's another one of the elegant epigrams by Owen, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com. The idea here is that Nature understands the order of birth and life and the end of life, but Death violates that order by taking a child before the parent!
Non prius auferres prolem quam, dura, parentem,
O mors, naturam || si sequerere ducem.
Naturam in vita, naturam in morte sequamur:
Vult natura hominem || vivere, vultque mori.
English: "O harsh Death, if only you would not carry off the child before the parent, and follow Nature as your leader. Let us follow Nature in life, and Nature in death; Nature wills when a man lives and when he dies."

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion speculates about Caesar's motives in the wake of the Clodius scandal: siue ex animi sententia, siue ut populo gratificaretur Clodium incolumem cupienti..

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about how deeds count more than words: Verbum laudatur, si factum tale sequatur (English: The word is praiseworthy, if a like deed should follow it).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Perit panis quo peregrinum canem alis (English: The bread is lost by which you feed a stray dog). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Amici mores noveris, non oderis (English: Know your friend's habits, don't despise them).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Frustra commisso claudetur ianua furto (English: It is useless to close the door once the theft has been - admittedly, the rhyme is not as strong in this one - commisso-furto, but the idea is very wise indeed!).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Fortitudo in nervum erumpit (English: This act of valor will land you in jail - the Latin word nervus has a wide range of metaphorical meanings - among them, prison, as you can see here!).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Parentes ama (English: Love your parents - and of course Latin reminds us, etymologically, that your "parents" are the ones who gave you birth).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Legite et discite (English: Read and learn).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Stultus verba multiplicat (Ecc. 10:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Vivis piscibus aqua, mortuis vinum (English: Water for the living fish, wine for the dead ones... poor fish, but happy diners!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Antiquior quam chaos et Saturnia tempora (English: Longer ago than Chaos and the rule of Saturn - Chaos being that chaos before the creation of the world).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄλλων ἰατρὸς, αὐτὸς ἕλκεσι βρύων (English: Doctor to other, you yourself are bursting with festering sores... a graphic variation on "physician, heal thyself!").

TODAY'S FABLES:

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE CATTA IN FEMINAM MUTATA, the wonderful story of what happened when Venus turned a cat into a woman.

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Ancilla et Lac, the wonderful story of the milkmaid's "air castle." Here is an illustration for the story (image source) from Aractingy's edition of LaFontaine's fables:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Round-Up: September 25-27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. This is another one of Owen's elegant little epigrams, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com.
Mille modis morimur mortales, nascimur uno.
Sunt hominum morbi || mille, sed una salus.
English: "We mortals die in a thousand ways; we are born in one way. People have a thousand illnesses, but one well-being." What a fun little poem to read out loud! :-)

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion contains a quote famously attributed to Caesar about his divorce from his wife in the wake of the Bona Dea scandal: Quod quum incredibile uideretur, accusator quaesiuit ex eo, cur ergo uxorem dimisisset. Tum Caesar respondit: Quia suam uxorem etiam suspicione uacare uellet.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today which I really liked: Alios effugere saepe, te numquam potes (English: You can often escape others, but you can never escape yourself).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ut flatus venti, sic transit gloria mundi (English: Like a puff of wind, so passes the glory of the world). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Non est ad astra mollis e terris via (English: The way from the earth to the stars is not easy - the rhyme here is not as strong (astra-via), but the sentiment is a good one!).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Iacta est alea (English: The die is cast - an even more famous quote from Julius Caesar).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Rore pascitur (English: He feeds on the dew... something a donkey should not attempt, as Aesop warns us!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Fata viam invenient. (English: The Fates will find a way... so don't worry: even if you cannot find the way, your destiny will do that for you).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Unus interitus est hominis et iumentorum (Ecc. 3:19). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Dormienti vulpi cadit intra os nihil (English: When the fox is sleeping, nothing falls into her mouth... in other words: if the fox wants to eat, she is going to have to work).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Mens non inest Centauris (English: Centaurs are crazy! - there is that wise Centaur Chiron, of course, but this proverb is about those crazy Centaurs in the battle with the Lapiths).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Φιλῶν ἃ μὴ δεῖ, οὐ φιλήσεις ἃ δεῖ (English: When you love things you shouldn't, you will not love the things you should - a great little lesson in the Greek negatives μὴ and οὐ).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE CATTO ET VULPE, the story of the single-minded cat and the fox with her notorious bag of tricks!

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Rusticus et Aratrum Eius, the story of the farmer whose cart got stuck in the mud. Given the week that I have had, I definitely wanted to include this image in today's blog round-up: it's a very good depiction of how I was feeling on Friday, ha ha. :-)





Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Round-Up: September 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. Today's poem is actually an entire fable in iambic verse by the Renaissance poet Faernus (Gabriele Faerno). You can find a word list at NoDictionaries.com.
Supra domus tectum sedebat haedulus,
Lupoque obeunti infra maledixit, cui lupus
Non tu, inquit, ast locus maledicit hic mihi.
Tempus locusque animant quoque frigidissimos.
In English: "A little goat was sitting on the roof of a house; a wolf passed by below, and the kid insulted him. The wolf said to the kid, 'It's not you, but the place you're in which insults me.' The moral: Time and place can give courage to the most faint-hearted people." Since this one is a fable, I thought I would include an illustration, too! :-)

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Sua cuique hora (English: To each his own hour). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscoere potum (English: Drain the whole cup, if you want to know the drink).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Hilarem datorem diligit deus (English: God loves someone who gives cheerfully).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Titanas imploras (English: You're begging the Titans for help - just like Zeus himself had to ask the Titans for help in the battle with the Giants, striking a very dangerous bargain).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Amor caecus est (English: Love is blind... a saying sometimes represented emblematically by showing Cupid shooting his arrows blindfolded).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Medice, cura te ipsum (Luke 4:23). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Camelum saltare doces (English: You're teaching a camel to dance - a futile task for you, and embarrassing for the camel, as Aesop tells us!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Ad Herculis columnas (English: To the pillars of Hercules... which is to say: to the end of the known world - at what we call the Strait of Gibraltar).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐις τετρημένον πίθον ἀντλεῖς (English: You're bailing water with a sieve that has holes in it).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE AGRICOLA ET FILIIS, the story of an ingenious father and how he taught his sons to get along with each other.

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Equus et Asellus Onustus, the sad story of the donkey who had to carry the load without help from the horse. Here is an illustration for the story (image source) from a Renaissance edition of Aesop where you can see the donkey looking very sad indeed!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Round-Up: September 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem nonum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. Today is one of the emblematic poems of Alciato. There is a word list at NoDictionaries.com; note also that the words aurata and sarda are names of species of fish in the poem - plus you can see the emblem online here!
Pisciculos aurata rapit medio aequore sardas,
Ni fugiant pavidae, || summa marisque petant.
Ast ibi sunt mergis fulicisque voracibus esca.
Eheu, intuta manens || undique debilitas.
English: "The gilt fish seizes the little sardine fish in the midst of the ocean's depth, if they don't run away in fright and head for the surface of the sea. But when they get there, they become food for the greedy gulls and water fowl. Alas, weakness remains unprotected everywhere." Yes, indeed, there are somedays when I feel exactly like those sardines: out of the mouth of the gilt fish into the maw of the gull! :-)

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion show Caesar trying to distance himself - and fast! - from the Clodius scandal: Caesar cum uxore statim diuortium fecit. Testimonium uero iussus dicere, nihil se eorum quo Clodio obiicerentur cognitum habere respondit.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about all brawn and no brains: Vis sine consilio mole ruit sua (English: Force without planning collapses under its own weight).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Patria sua cuique iucundissima (English: To each person, his own fatherland is the most agreeable). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's rhyming proverb is: Ubi mel, ibi fel (English: Where there's honey, there's bile).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Numquid aliquis panem petenti lapidem porriget? (English: Surely no one reaches out a stone to someone seeking bread? - a wonderful use of the loaded Latin question word, numquid).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Fuge magna (English: Flee from big things... personally, I find this very good advice - it can mean big affairs of state or, in my case, big works of literature: I flee from big epics to work on little proverbs!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Instar aquae tempus (English: Time is an image of water... it flows! Just think of Heraclitus and his river.).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Tempus custodiendi et tempus abiciendi (Ecc. 3:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Vacca, quae multum boat, parum lactis habet (English: A cow who moos a lot gives little milk).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Vel Megaram usque (English: [To go] Even as far as Megara - in which Megara stands for a wealthy and prosperous destination, the kind of place you would be willing to go a long way to reach!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Χελώην Πεγάσῳ συγκρίνεις (English: You're comparing a tortoise to Pegasus - that mythical flying horse of supernatural speed!).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Pastoris Puer et Agricolae, the famous story of the boy who cried, "Wolf!"

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE NUTRICE ET LUPO, a story about a nurse who cries "Wolf!" in quite a different kind of story.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Gilbo, Pars Quinta Decima, the fifteenth in Anthony Gibbins's series of little stories about Gilbo and his family. This is the last of the Gilbo stories so far... let's hope Anthony has some more in store for us! Euge!





Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Round-Up: September 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. Today's poem is another one of Owen's epigrams (Owen 3.172) - two couplets this time. You can find a word list at NoDictionaries.com.
Nil temere facias, timide nihil, omnia caute,
Cuncta cito, sero || nil, subitoque nihil.
Natura es timidus? Fortem prudentia reddet,
Nemo cavenda timet, || qui metuenda cavet.
English: "Don't do anything rashly, don't do anything timidly, be cautious in all things; everything on time, nothing late, and nothing rashly. Are you timid by nature? Caution will make a man brave; no one need be frightened of things that can be watched out for ... if he watches out for things that are frightening." Just look at that last line for a lovely example of the elegant mirroring of the epigrammatic style!

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion tells us that Clodius had defenders, too: Huic eorum conatui populus se opponens, Clodio auxiliabatur, quod ei plurimum profuit, quia iudices perterrefacti multitudinem formidabant.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about life and luck: Nec vita nec fortuna hominibus perpes est (English: People's life is not ever-lasting, nor is their luck).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Mea mecum porto (English: I carry my things with me). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Ne credas isti, semel a quo laesus abisti (English: Do not trust the man from whom you once turned away, wounded).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cupressum scis simulare (English: You know how to imitate a cypress - a famous line from Horace's Ars Poetica).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Concussus surgo (English: Struck down, I rise up... what a great motto: both optiistic and defiant!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Meo contentus sum (English: I am content with what is mine).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Navis pertransit fluctuantem aquam et, cum praeterierit, non est vestigium invenire (Wisdom 5:10). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Cani dat paleas, asino ossa (English: You're giving taw to the dog, and bones to the donkey... which is definitely the wrong way to go about tending your animals!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Iro pauperior (English: More poor than Irus - referring to Irus, the proverbial pauper of the island of Ithaca).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ῥεχθὲν δὲ τε νήπιος ἔγνω (English: Even a silly person knows a done deed).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Senex et Mors, the story of the old man who found out he didn't want to die after all!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE CERVO IN AQUAS INSPICIENTE, the story of the stag and his mixed-up body image.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Gilbo, Pars Quarta Decima, the fourteenth in Anthony Gibbins's series of little stories about Gilbo and his family.





Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, September 21, 2009

Round-Up: September 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

NOVITAS: You will see that I have a new widget premiering today: a selection of proverbs in Leonine rhyme collected by Julius Wegeler. Unlike the other proverb widgets, this one comes with English in the widget. As I explained when I introduced the Polydorus widget, I don't like translating proverbs into English as it seems to me they lose their charm that way... but since I have quite a few all-Latin proverb widgets, I will create the next set of widgets as bilingual, and people can choose which one(s) they like best. Meanwhile, you can also find some two-line Leonine verses from Wegeler already collected in the Poetry Widget, too!

HODIE: ante diem undecimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. It's another bit of dactylic hexameter from Horace (Sermones 2.6) about the transitoriness of life, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Dum licet, in rēbus iucundis vīve beātus,
vīve memor, quam sīs aevī brevis. [...]
English: "While you may, live happily in pleasant circumstances; live and be mindful how short-lived you are." This is a fine use of a genitive phrase in the predicate, which we usually have to translate with an adjective, as here. I've marked a couple of long vowels to aid in scansion, too. :-)

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion explains that Clodius is in SERIOUS trouble now: Itaque ei quidam tribunorum plebis diem uiolatae religionis dixit, factaque est contra Clodium coitio potentissimorum senatorum, qui ei quum alia horrenda flagitia, tum incestum cum sorore Lucullo nupta obiicerent.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about knowledge NOT being for its own sake: Doctus sine opera ut nubes est sine pluvia (English: A learned man without works is like a cloud without rain).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Frenis saepe repugnat equus (English: The horse often fights against the reins). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nihil sacrum (English: Nothing is sacred).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb in Leonine verse form is: Omne quod exoritur, terra fit et moritur. (English: Everything which rises up, turns to earth and dies).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Deus ulciscetur (English: God will be the avenger... even if human justice cannot do so!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Cum bonis ambula (English: Walk with the good people... which is to say: not with the bad!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Numquid ambulare potest homo super prunas et non conburentur plantae eius? (Proverbs 6:27-28). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Formicae sua bilis inest, habet et musca splenem (English: The ant has its bile, and the fly too has its spleen - we had a saying last week about the bile of the little insects, which accounts for their bad temper - so too with spleen, which makes you "splenetic").

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Sunt aliquid Manes (English: The Manes (ghosts of the dead) are something... in other words, they do exist, as Propertius claimed to finally realize in one of his elegies).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐξ τοῦ εἰσορᾷν γίνεται ἀνθρώποις ἐρᾷν (English: From gazing, people are prone to feel passion... so, if you don't want to inflame desire: don't look!).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Equus et Leo, the story of how a lion pretended to be a doctor - but the horse was not fooled!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE LEONE ET MURE, the story of a lion who needed the help of a mouse, much to his surprise.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Gilbo, Pars Tertia Decima, the thirteenth in Anthony Gibbins's series of little stories about Gilbo and his family.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, September 18, 2009

Round-Up: September 18-20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. It's another one of Cato's distichs, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com.
Si tibi pro meritis nemo succurrit amicus,
Incusare deos noli, sed te ipse coerce.
In English: "If no friend comes to help you in return for your past services, do not blame the gods, but rather correct yourself." In other words: think about just what you might have done that have made your friends so slow to come to your aid. Perhaps your estimate of your merita is overrated!

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion spreads the news of Clodius's outrageous behavior: Ea adhuc nocte matronae domum digressae maritis rem aperuerunt, interdiuque rumor per urbem dispersus est, Clodium infanda conatum non iis modo ad quos ea iniuria pertineret, sed ciuitati etiam diisque poenas debere.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about humble beginnings: E parvo semine multa messis (English: From a small seed a great harvest).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Celerius quam asparagi coquuntur (English: Faster than asparagus is cooked). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Aut bibat, aut abeat (English: Let him either drink, or depart - an old Greek proverb which we know thanks to Cicero).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Hora fugit (English: The hour is running away - a saying which Ovid puts to good use).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Memento semper finis (English: Always keep the end in mind - which is to say, your end, death, as you can see in this fuller version of the phrase from Thomas a Kempis: Memento semper finis, et quia perditum non redit tempus, "Always keep the end in mind, and the fact that time, once lost, does not return").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Diligite iustitiam, qui iudicatis terram (Wisdom 1:1). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is has some intricate word order for great effect: Parva necat morsu spatiosum vipera taurum (English: The tin viper with its bite kills the enormous bull).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Tantali horti (English: The gardens of Tantalus - which is to say, tantalizing gardens whose fruits are unreachable; you can read about Tantalus's famous underworld punishment here at Wikipedia).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Γεύεται πίσσης ὁ μῦς (English: The mouse tastes the pitch - and, as you can imagine, things do not turn out well for the mouse: the mouse falls into the boiling pitch and perishes, all because he wanted to take just a little taste; a proverb we know thanks to Theocritus).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Ranae et Iupiter, the story of the foolish frogs who thought they needed a king.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE SATYRO ET VIATORE, the wonderful story of the satyr who found a poor wayfarer in the snow.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Gilbo, Pars Duodecima, the twelfth in Anthony Gibbins's series of little stories about Gilbo and his family. You can enjoy some Gilbo adventures this weekend!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Round-Up: September 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. It's from one of Horace's verse epistles written in dactylic hexameters; you can find a word list at NoDictionaries.com. I've marked a couple of the long marks that could be helpful in scanning:
Quem res plus nimio delectavēre secundae,
mutātae quatient. [...]
In English: "When favorable events have delighted someone overmuch, they will shake him when changed." Here's a webpage with the complete Latin text of the poem with an English translation.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion tells how Clodius was driven out of the house: isque inuentus est in conclaui ancillae, quae eum domum adduxerat, quo confugerat, agnitusque a mulieribus domo eiicitur.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today for all of us poor scholars! Doctrinam magis quam aurum eligite (English: Choose learning rather than gold).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi. (English: What is permitted to Jove is not permitted to an ox). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Delatores qui non castigat, irritat (English: He who does not rebuke informers, incites them - a line from Suetonius's Life of Domitian).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Actum agis (English: You're doing something that's been done... which is to say: you're wasting your time).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Lapides excavant aquae (English: Waters wear away stones... a great natural paradox - with all kinds of metaphorical applications, too!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Nonne duodecim horae sunt diei? (John 11:9). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Est et formicae et culici sua bilis (English: Even the ant and the gnat have their bile - which is to say, they have a temper, too - in the ancient theory of the humors, having bile, Greek "choler," could make you choleric, or melancholic!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Antiquior Codro (English: Older than Codrus - which is not say that Codrus was notably old, but that he lived a very long time ago, being the last of Athen's legendary kings; you can read about him here at Wikipedia).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐγὼ δὲ καὶ σὺ ταυτὸν ἕλκομεν ζυγόν (English: You and I do not pull the same yoke).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Lupus et Sus, the story of a mama pig and a suspiciously friendly wolf.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is De Vulpe in Puteo, the story of the fox who was stuck at the bottom of a well.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Aeneas ad inferos, the story of Aeneas's journey to the underworld, another contribution from Magistra Holt!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Round-Up: September 16

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. This is another one of the delightful epigrams of Owen, this time about the power of one word: "no." You can get a NoDictionaries.com word list here.
Concurrat veterum licet in te turba, potes tu
Hac omnes una || vincere voce: nego.

English: "Even if a crowd of the ancients should rally against you, you can defeat them all with this one word: I say no." The epigram is a good way to remember the Latin etymology of that verb, nego - it is just the word ne, "no!" with a form of the verb aio , "I say" = nego, "no I say!"

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today is pretty hilarious: Clodius is totally in trouble! cumque is se Pompeiae Abram (id est ancilla delicatior), ut et ipsa uocabatur, quaerere diceret et uirum se esse uoce proderet, subito magna cum uociferatione ad lumina et turbam se proripit, uirum se in aedibus deprehendisse clamans. Et territis mulieribus Aurelia, orgiis deae sublatis, fores occludi iussit, domumque facibus praelucentibus perlustrauit, Clodium quaerens.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about the transitoriness of life: Ut hora sunt dies nostri super terram (English: Like an hour are our days upon the earth).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Hic mortui vivunt, hic muti loquuntur (English: Here the dead live; here the mute speak). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Cum sancto sanctus eris, cum perverso perverteris (English: With the holy man you will be holy; with the wicked man wicked - with a very sly use of the verb, perverseris - like verseris, but with the per prefix!).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Utere virtute (English: Use your power! ... although we all know that it's impossible to really translate that Latin virtus into English).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Arma tuentur pacem (English: Arms keep the peace - which you can see on this military insignia).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Nunc hunc, nunc illum consumit gladius (II Samuel 11:25... so much for arms keeping the peace, as in the preceding nitti). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Unus lanius non timet multas oves (English: A single butcher does not fear many sheep... unarmed as those sheep always are!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Quod dei deo, quod Caesaris Caesari (English: What is God's [give] to God, and what is Caesar's to Caesar).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐν νυκτὶ λαμπρὸς, ἐν φάει δ' ἀνωφελής (English: Bright at night, useless in daylight).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Venter et Membra, the story made famous by Livy about the body's revolt against the stomach.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE DELPHINO ET SMARIDE, the story of the little picarel and the dolphin.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Aeneas et Dido - Brevis Libellus, the story of Dido and Aeneas contributed by Magistra Holt!


Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Round-Up: September 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. It's the moral to one of my favorite fables by Phaedrus, the story of The Priests and Their Donkey - here's the whole fable with a word list: Asinus et Galli Vocabulary.
Qui natus est infelix, non vitam modo
tristem decurrit, verum post obitum quoque
persequitur illum dura fati miseria.
English: "He who is born unlucky not only lives a sad life but in fact even after his death, the harsh misery of his fate pursues him." The story is about a donkey who is beaten by his owners, and after he dies, they make his hide into a drum and keep on beating him even then!

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion describes how Clodius was discovered in the house during the goddess's rites: cum fores apertas offendisset ab ancilla rei conscia tuto introducitur. Haec dum ad Pompeiam accurrit rei indicandae causa et mora fit Clodius manere ubi relictus erat non sustinens, magna in domo hinc inde oberrat, lucem fugiens. In eum Aureliae pedisequa incidit, et mulierem rata ad colludendum inuitat, detrectantemque in medium protrahit, et quis atque unde esset percontatur.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about self-reliance: Cum tuus es, noli servire nisi tibi soli (English: Since you are your own person, do not serve anyone except yourself alone).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Poma aut matura cadunt aut immatura leguntur (English: Fruits either fall when they are ripe or are gathered before they're ripe). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Scuto pacem petunt (English: They seek peace with a shield - which is to say, they send a mixed message, showing up at the peace treaty negotiations while bearing arms - you can find a similar saying in this form hastam simul et caduceum (mittere), "both a spear and a herald's staff").

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Varietas delectat (English: Variety is pleasing - or, as we say in English, "variety is the spice of life").

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Nemo nascitur artifex (English: No one is born a craftsman - a craft is something each person must learn).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Faciendi plures libros nullus est finis (Ecc. 12:12). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Murem elephas non capit (English: An elephant does not catch a mouse - the idea being that a big elephant doesn't mess with the small stuff; it's not about elephants being, supposedly, afraid of mice).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Amare simul et sapere ipsi Iovi non datur. (English: To be in love and keep your wits at the same time is not possible even for Jupiter... as we know from many of his crazy love affairs).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὸν τὸ εὖ γνῶναι (English: it is a difficult thing to have clear understanding - even if you are not in love; cf. the preceding proverb).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Cervus in Boum Stabulo, the story of a stag who tried to hide in a stable.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE CANE VETULO ET MAGISTRO, the story of an old dog and his thankless master.

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Rōmulus et Remus, a wonderful mythological storybook by Magister Gollan - with macrons.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, September 14, 2009

Round-Up: September 14

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

NOVITAS: You will see that I have a new widget premiering today: a selection of the sacred and profane adages collected by Polydorus Vergilius! Unlike the other proverb widgets, this one comes with English in the widget. I'm bowing to public pressure here - I don't like translating proverbs into English as it seems to me they lose their charm that way... but since I have quite a few all-Latin proverb widgets, I will create the next set of widgets as bilingual, and people can choose which one(s) they like best. :-)

HODIE: ante diem undevicesimum Kalendas Octobres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S POEM: Here is today's little poem, from the Poetry Widget. This is another rhyming Leonine Latin verse collected by Wegeler, and here is the NoDictionaries.com word list.
Tempus adhuc veniet, quo dives, qui modo gaudet,
Assidue flebit, dum pauper grata videbit.
In English: "The time will yet come, when the rich man, who now rejoices, will weep endlessly, while the poor man will see things that are pleasing." The theme is Biblical (think of the parable of Lazarus and Dives, as it is often called, even in English), and it also echoes the theme of the Wheel of Fortune, with her inevitable ups and downs.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion tells how Clodius infiltrated the rites of Bona Dea, disguised as a woman: Ea tum sacra Pompeia administrante, Clodius imberbis adhuc eoque se latere posse sperans habitu psaltriae, specie mulieris iuuenis ad aedes uenit, quumque fores apertas offendisset, ab ancilla rei conscia tuto introducitur..

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about self-awareness: Non parvum est seipsum noscere (English: It is no small thing to know oneself).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Stultus quoque, si tacuerit, sapiens reputabitur (English: The fool, too, if he can just keep quiet, will be considered a wise man). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Non est opus valentibus medico (English: People who are well have no need of a doctor - although we could adapt this Biblical saying for the health insurance debate, and say instead that people who already have health insurance have no need of a public option!).

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Lucernam olet (English: It stinks of the lamp - in other words, it smells like you have been burning the midnight oil, as we would say, and doing sloppy work as a result - a Latin saying that is perfect for those papers students turn in after pulling an all-nighter!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Sic semper tyrannis (English: May it always be thus for tyrants - which can see in the seal of the state of Virginia).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Tempus adquirendi et tempus perdendi (Ecc. 3:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Quasi asinus ad lyram, aures motitans (English: Like a donkey listening to the lyre, wiggling his ears… the idea being, of course, that the donkey is no connoisseur of music, however much his ears may be wiggling!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Metit Orcus grandia cum parvis (English: Orcus reaps the great with the small - Orcus being one of the ominous gods of he underworld).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὰ τὰ καλά (English: Noble things are difficult to achieve… which is part of their nobility after all!).

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Cornix et Urna, a story about a wise crow and how she was able to take a drink of water.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE LEONE, ASINO ET GALLO, a story of a donkey who overestimated his own abilities… as donkeys are prone to do (see the proverb above for the donkey's artistic aspirations).

Tar Heel Readers: Materials continue to accumulate at Tar Heel Reader (keep up with the latest items at the Libelli Latini blog). Today I decided to feature Gilbo, Pars Undecima, the eleventh in Anthony Gibbins's series of little stories about Gilbo and his family!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.