Thursday, April 30, 2009

Round-Up: April 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 69, which features this saying about the ends justifying the means: Cuius finis bonus est, ipsum quoque bonum est (When the end of something is good, the thing itself is also good).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's my favorite from today, because of the lovely alliteration: Fabricando fabri fimus (English: By making we become makers).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dimittis pullos sub custodia vulpis (English: You're leaving the chickens in the care of the fox - in other words, you're letting the fox guard the henhouse!). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Vivis sperandum (English: Those who are alive must hope - in other words, don't give up hope while you've still got life!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Contentus vivo parvo (English: I live contented by little - a saying I definitely can agree with, being a big fan of the "less is more" philosophy of life).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Deponentes mendacium, loquimini veritatem (Eph. 4:25). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Leonina societas periculorum plena (English: Keeping company with a lion is full of dangers - as the fable of the lion's share shows, of course!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Moribus antiquis res stat Romana virisque (English: The Roman state stands by virtue of its ancient customs and its men - a saying from the archaic Roman poet Ennius, preserved by Saint Augustine).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ταντάλου κῆπον τρυγᾷς (English: You're harvesting the garden of Tantalus - a literally fruitless task, given Tantalus's unfortunate situation in the underworld). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Aucupe et Perdice, the story of the partridge pleading for her life.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE ET LUPO (the story of the wolf who loved liberty, and the dog who loved good food). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Viatore et Mercurio, the story of the traveler who wanted to trick the god Mercury. Here's an illustration for the fable (image source), showing Hermes with his winged sandals, from a fifth-century Greek vase:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Round-Up: April 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 68, which features this great legal maxim, with a double-dative no less: Cui bono? (For whose benefit?).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today with a great bit of Latin wordplay with reg: Si animo regeris, rex es; si corpore, servus (English: If you are guided by the mind, you are a king; if by the body, a slave).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ne capra contra leonem (English: A goat should not mess with a lion). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Camelus saltat (English: The camel is dancing... and as Aesop informs us, this was not a pretty sight).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Fumus, ergo ignis (English: Smoke, therefore fire - in other words, "where there's smoke, there's fire").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Vade retro me, Satana (Mark 8:33). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Mus non uni fidit antro (English: A mouse doesn't put his trust in just one hole - even the mouse knows it's important to keep your options open!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Qui diligit ranam, ranam putat esse Dianam (English: When someone loves a frog, he things the frog is the goddess Diana... which is definitely one you have to read in Latin for the rhyme!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐξ ἴσου δίδου πᾶσιν (English: Give to all equally - "eks isou," like an isosceles triangle!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Vitulā et Bove, the story of the carefree heifer and what happened to her as a result. For more about the hard-working ox, see the story below about the ox and his horns.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Bove cornua petente, the story of the story of the ox who thought he wanted horns!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE SOLE ET VENTO (the story of the contest between the Sun and the Wind). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments. Here is the illustration of the fable by Francis Barlow:



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Round-Up: April 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 67, which features this saying about the shoemaker needing to stick to his last: Ne supra crepidam sutor. (Don't let the shoemaker go beyond his sandal sole - in other words, he should stick to the trade he knows!).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a great anti-imperial slogan: Est pax villana melior quam pugna Romana (English: A village peace is better than a Roman war).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Elephantus culicem non curat (English: An elephant doesn't worry about a gnat). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Mundus transit (English: The world passes away...The full phrase in I John is Et mundus transit, et concupiscentia eius).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Ex alieno prodigus (English: Lavish with someone else's stuff - and of course it's easy to be generous when your hand is in someone else's purse!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Diligite inimicos vestros (Matt. 5:44). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is A bove maiori discit arare minor (English: The lesser ox learns to plow from the greater - but you will also frequently find this typographical error repeated over and over on the Internet: Ab ove maiori discit arare minor... as if sheep could learn to pull the plough!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Aurora Musis amica est (English: The dawn is a friend to the Muses - good advice for any aspiring novelists out there: rise early and seek your Muses by the dawn's light!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πηγάσου ταχύτερος (English: Swifter than Pegasus - Pegasus being the great winged horse of Greek mythology). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Lupō Ovis Pelle Indūtō , the story of the wolf who dressed in sheep's clothing... and paid a terrible price for it in the end.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE RANA ET VULPE (the story of the frog who wanted to be a doctor). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Camelus, the story of the camel who asked Zeus for a pair of horns. Here's an illustration for the fable from an edition of Aesop's fables published in 1479 (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, April 27, 2009

Round-Up: April 27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 66, which features this saying: De mortuis nil nisi bonum (About the dead nothing, except what is good - that is, say nothing bad about the dead).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a nice one from today: Mutum est pictura poem (English: A picture is a poem that does not speak - although English cannot match the elegant word order of the Latin, with the gender agreement linking mutum and poema).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is one of my very favorite rhyming proverbs - Est avis in dextra melior quam quattuor extra (English: A bird in the right hand is better than four outside.). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Bilingues cavendi (English: Watch out for two-tongued people - a saying you can see illustrated in Whitney's Emblems, based on the Aesop's fable of the satyr and the man in the snow).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Divide ut regnes (English: Divide so that you can conquer - or, as we say in English, "divide and conquer").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Quasi aquae, delabimur in terram, quae non revertuntur (II Samuel 14:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Ut piscis extra aquam (English: Like a fish out of water - watch out for that ut; very often Latin studetnts become so attuned to its use in introducing purpose and results clauses, it's easy to forget that it can also introduce a simple simile, as here).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Rana Seriphia (English: A frog from Serpiphos - which is to say, someone who is silent, as the frogs on the island of Seriphos were strangely mute, as opposed to the notoriously noisy frogs throughout the rest of the Mediterranean).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ὀυδὲ Ἡρακλῆς πρὸς δύο (English: Not even Hercules against two - that is, he doesn't take on more than one opponent at a time). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Vulpe et Lupō, the story of the fox who had to ask the wolf for help because she had gotten stuck in a well.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE RANIS ET EARUM REGE (the famous story of the frogs who wanted a king). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Rustico, the story of a farmer who tried what we could call some "genetic engineering" on his wheat, with the help of the goddess Ceres. Here's an illustration for the fable (image source) from a Greek red figure vase, showing Demeter (Ceres), and some wheat, too!






Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, April 26, 2009

Round-Up: April 26

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 65, which features this fine saying in praise of wisdom: Nemo nisi sapiens liber est (No one is free, unless he is wise).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a nice rhyming one from today: Doctrinae cultus nemo spernit nisi stultus (English: No one rejects the cultivation of learning, unless he is a fool).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Et canis in somnis vestigia latrat (English: A dog also barks at the trail when dreaming). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Meliora speranda (English: Better things are to be hoped!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Conscientia mille testes (English: Your conscience is a thousand witnesses).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Unusquisque in arte sua sapiens est. (Sirach 38:31). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Asinus stramen mavult quam aurum (English: A donkey prefers straw to gold - something like the rooster in the Aesop's fable who prefers barley to pearls).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Cupido, quantus es! (English: Cupid, how great you are! - a saying from Plautus).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄπληστον τὸ διὰ παντὸς κέρδος (English: Desire for profit is always insatiable). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 21: Dē Equō et Asinō, the story of the proud horse and the humble donkey.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE HERINACEIS VIPERAS HOSPITES EIICIENTIBUS (theh wonderful story of the hedgehogs as houseguests in the vipers' den). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Bubulco et Leone, the story of the cowherd who thought he wanted to find the lion who had raided his herd. Here's an illustration for the fable (image source):



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Round-Up: April 25

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Maias, which is the date of the ancient agricultural festival called the Rogigalia. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 64, which features the famous saying about the fox and the hedgehog: Ars varia vulpi, ars una echino maxima (The fox has a variety of tricks; the hedgehog has just one very big trick).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one I really liked, since I am a fan of accomplishing many little tasks, even if I am intimidated by big tasks: Melius est pisciculos cepisse quam desidia omnino torpere (English: It is better to have caught some teeny-tiny fish than to be totally paralyzed with laziness).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Audacem reddit felis absentia murem (English: The cat's absence makes the mouse grow bold). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Cognatos cole (English: Cherish your kinsmen - a saying from the famous Monostichs of Cato)

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Carcer numquam pulcher (English: Prison is never pretty - Latin carcer giving us the English word "incarceration").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Suavis est homini panis mendacii (Proverbs 20:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Elephantem saltare doces (English: You're teaching an elephant to dance... which is to say, you are engaging in a futile task - the elephant not being especially light on his feet).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Cyprio bovi merendam (English: lunch fit for a Cyprian bull - and Cyprian bulls were notorious for eating manure, so this fragment of Ennius refers to what is clearly not a very appetizing meal).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ὄνος ἄγει μυστήρια (English: The donkey is carrying the icon - an allusion to the famous story of the donkey who thought the people were worshipping him, instead of the image of the goddess he was carrying). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CATTA IN FEMINAM MUTATA (the story of what happened when Venus turned a cat into a woman). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Cornice et Cane, the story of the crow, the dog, and Athena. Here's an illustration for the fable (image source), showing the statue of Athena in the full-sized replica of the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Friday, April 24, 2009

Round-Up: April 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 63, which features this saying about life's ups and downs: Felix per omnia nullus est mortalium (No mortal is lucky in everything).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one with a nice play on words: Melius est praevenire quam praeveniri (English: It is better to anticipate than to be anticipated).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Vade ad formicam, o piger! (English: Turn to the ant, you lazy person - a wonderful saying from the Biblical Book of Proverbs). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Troia fuit (English: Troy was - which is to say, it was, and is no more - Troy is a "has-been").

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Mortalia facta peribunt (English: Mortal deeds will pass away - a saying from Horace's Ars Poetica).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Stultorum infinitus est numerus (Ecc. 1:15). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Navita de ventis, de bobus narrat arator (English: The sailor speaks of winds, the ploughman of his oxen - and note the form navita here, for nauta).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Lydus in meridie (English: A Lydian at noon - which is an allusion to the supposedly oversexed inhabitants of ancient Lydian, so eager in their pursuit of sexual pleasures that they would even indulge in such pursuits in the heat of midday).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸν καπνὸν φεύγων, εἰς τὸ πῦρ ἔπεσον (English: Fleeing the smoke, I fell into the fire - something like the English saying, "out of the frying pan, into the fire"). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Leōne Amātōriō, the story of the lion in love.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ANU ET ANCILLIS (a great story of unexpected consequences). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Lupo et Vulpe, the story of what happened when the fox and the wolf made their petitions to Jupiter. Here's an illustration for the fable (image source), showing a statue of Jupiter in the Vatican Museum:



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Round-Up: April 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem nonum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 62, which features this nice cosmopolitan saying: Patria mea totus mundus est (My homeland is the whole world).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one about the benefits of teaching: Si vis scire, doce (English: If you wish to know - teach!).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Perdimus anguillam dum manibus stringimus illam (English: We lose the eel as we are squeezing it between our hands). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Nil desperandum (English: There is nothing to despair of - in other words: keep hoping!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Naturae convenienter vive (English: Live in accordance with Nature - a saying adopted by the philosopher Immanuel Kant).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Quis ex vobis patrem petet piscem, numquid pro pisce serpentem dabit illi? (Luke 11:11). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Vae miseris ovibus, iudex lupus est (English: Alas, poor sheep; the judge is a wolf - which you can also find in this fuller form, Vae miseris ovibus, iudex lupus est ubi saevus, "Alas, poor sheep, when the judge is a savage wolf!").

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Decet timeri Caesarem (English: It is right that Caesar should be feared - a saying adapted from Seneca's Octavia).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ὤδινεν ὄρος, εἶτα μῦν ἀπέτεκεν (English: The mountain was in labor, and then it gave birth to a mouse). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Vulpēculā et Cicōniā, the story of how the stork managed to get her revenge on the fox.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE ET QUIBUSDAM ALIIS QUADRUPEDIBUS (the famous story of the lion's share). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Iove et Serpente, the story of the snake who offered a rose to Jupiter as a present, but was refused. ere's an illustration for the fable (image source) - just look at the stamp on the far left, which provides an illustration of the story:



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Round-Up: April 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 61, which features this saying in praise of knowledge: Ipsa scientia potestas est (Knowledge itself is the power - that is, the power to do things: potest, "it can").

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a good one for Earth Day today: Plantate hortos et comedite fructum eorum (English: Plant gardens, and eat their fruit).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Cogito, ergo sum (English: I think, therefore I am - that famous motto of Descartes). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Nulli praeda (English: A prey to nobody - a popular family motto, appropriately defiant!).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Cui fidas vide (English: Watch whom you trust - a wise saying you can also find in this fuller form: Fide, sed cui fidas, vide!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Aquae furtivae dulciores sunt, et panis absconditus suavior (Proverbs 9:17). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Dente lupus, cornu taurus petit (English: The wolf attacks with his fang, the bull with his horn - a saying you can find in Horace).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Carthago delenda est (English: Carthage must be destroyed - Cato's famous slogan).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πρὸς λέοντα δορκάδες συνάπτουσι μάχας (English: The deer are engaging in battle against a lion - which is to say, they have taken on an opponent whose fighting prowess far exceeds theirs!). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 18: Dē Accipitre Columbam Insequente, the story of the hawk who was himself caught as he tried to catch a dove.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CATTO ET VULPE (the story of how the fox's whole bag of tricks failed her, while the cat was saved by one very good trick). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De milvo aegrotante, the story of the kite's death-bed reptentance. Here's Barlow's illustration for the fable (image source):



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Round-Up: April 21

Hi everybody, I'm back - and here is a round-up of today's blog posts! For previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem undecimum Kalendas Maias, which is the holiday called Parilia in ancient Rome. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 60, which features this tempting logical fallacy: Post hoc, ergo propter hoc (After this, therefore because of this).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today I really liked: Omnia probate; quod bonum est, tenete (English: Try all things; that which is good, keep!).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Pisces natare doces (English: You're teaching the fish to swim). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Studiis invigilandum (English: Stay awake in your studies! A great motto for all of us students, young and old... you can read a wonderful verse about it in Whitney's Emblems: Watche, write, and reade, and spende no idle hower).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Veritas vos liberabit (English: Truth will set you free - which is the Latin motto of the Johns Hopkins University).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Gratis accepistis; gratis date (Matt. 10:8). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Nutrit et accipiter pullos suos (English: Even the hawk nourishes its chicks - despite the hawk's proverbial war-like nature).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Sciunt quod Iuno fabulata est cum Iove (English: They know what Juno chatted about with Jupiter - a saying you can find in Plautus).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Μὴ τιμωμένης ἀρετῆς, ἣ κακία παρρησιάζεται (English: If virtue is not rewarded, wickedness runs riot). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Dē Agricolā et Cicōniā, the story of the stork who tried to save her life based on her good reputation.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE AGRICOLA ET FILIIS (the famous story of the father who taught the importance of unity to his quarrelsome sons). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Hercule et Auriga, the story of Hercules and the wagon-driver, teaching the lesson that "God helps them that help themselves." Here's an illustration for the fable by Francis Barlow (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Hiatus brevis: April 16-April 19

I'm not going to have reliable computer access for a few days, so the blogs will be briefly on hiatus. The Heri Hodie Cras Podcast will continue unchanged, and there will be an an Aesop's Fable of the Day AND an Aesop's Fable with Macrons every day, too!

You can still see the latest proverbs and fables of the day by visiting the Bestiaria Blog, but without commentary or translation, though, until I get back online.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day:


Vulgate Verse of the Day:


Greek Proverb of the Day:


Proverbium Perbreve of the Day:


Proverbium Breve of the Day:


Latin Animal Proverb of the Day:


Proper Name Proverb of the Day:


Finally, here's a fable from the Florilegium Fabularum to tide you over: De Homine et Deo ligneo, the story of the man and the idol. Here's an illustration for the fable from an edition of Aesop published in 1521 (image source):




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Round-Up: April 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 54, which features this admirable saying: Nihil gratius pace (There is no thing more welcome than peace).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one about the famous wheel of Fortune: Cum favet Fortuna, cave, namque rota rotunda (English: When Fortune shows favor, beware, for her wheel is round).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Aquilam volare doces (English: You are teaching an eagle to fly). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Beati mites (English: Blessed are the meek - as you can read in the Sermon on the Mount).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Dies levat luctum (English: A day lightens the grief - something like "time heals all wounds").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Cor hominis disponet viam suam sed Domini est dirigere gressus eius (Proverbs 16:9). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Vade ad formicam, o piger, et considera vias eius et disce sapientiam (English: Go to the ant, you lazy person, and consder her ways and learn wisdom - a wonderful animal saying from the Biblical Book of Proverbs).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Laves Peliam (English: You would be giving Pelias a bath - which is to say, pretending to do someone a favor while plotting their destruction, just as Medea tricked Pelias).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Παρὰ ποταμὸν φρέαρ ὀρύττε (English: He's digging a well next to the river - something a bit similar to the proverb about teaching an eagle to fly, supra). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 11 : Dē Rūsticō et Arātrō Suō, the story of the man who prayed to Hercules when his cart was stuck in the mud.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE SATYRO ET VIATORE (the story of a satyr who rescued a man in the snow). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is Fabula 6. De Ape et Iove, the story of the bee who asked Jupiter for a stinger. Here's an illustration for the fable from a 1479 edition of Aesop (image source) - look at that big bee! Ouch!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Round-Up: April 14

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem duodevicesimum Kalendas Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 53, which features this rhetorical question: Quid libertate pretiosius? (What thing is more precious than freedom?).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one with a nice sound repetition: Fortuna favet fatuis (English: Fortune shows her favors to fools - there's a kind of "dumb luck" in the world, as we all know).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Aqua profunda est quieta (English: Deep water is still - in other words, "still waters run deep"). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Tithoni senecta (English: As long as Tithonus - which is to say, very old indeed, as Tithonus was blessed with immortality, but without the blessing of eternal youth).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Mari aquam addis (English: You're adding water to the sea... which is, alas, probably not the best use of time!).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Patres vestri ubi sunt? (Zech. 1:5). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Aut rex aut asinus (English: Either a king or a donkey - in other words, it's better to be one of the other, no messing about in the middle).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Daedaleum remigium (English: The oar of Daedalus - a proverbial expression in Plautus to refer to speedy flight, given that Daedalus flew threw the air with wings like oars).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Κέρδος αἰσχρὸν βαρὺ κειμήλιον (English: Shameful profit is a burdensome treasure). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 10: Dē Rūsticō et Silvā, the story of the trees who armed their own enemy!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE IN PUTEO (the story of the fox and the goat in the well). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Mure et Rana, the story of the treacherous frog! Here's an illustration for the fable from a 1521 edition of Aesop (image source):



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Monday, April 13, 2009

Round-Up: April 13

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: Idus Apriles, yes, it's the Ides of April. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 52, which features this great saying about greed for money: Cupiditas pecuniarum omni tyranno gravior (Desire for money is more burdensome than any dictator).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one with some lovely sound repetition in the Latin: Falsa est fiducia formae (English: Trusting in pretty appearances can be deceiving).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Sol oculus mundi (English: The sun is the eye of the world, a nice image which comes from the medieval dialogue of Pippin and Albin). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Destinatus obdura (English: Having made up your mind, endure - a saying adapted from a poem of Catullus).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Bona bonis contingunt (English: Good things happen to good people - ah, if only that were guaranteed in writing somewhere, eh?).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Deus superbis resistit; humilibus autem dat gratiam (James 4:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Aquila petit solem (English: The eagle seeks the sun - a family motto that goes back to ancient beliefs about the eagle and the sun, as you can read in the Physiologus).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Post nubila Phoebus (English: After clouds, the sun - a lovely saying where Phoebus Apollo stands in for the sun).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ψωριῶσα κάμελος πολλῶν ὄνων ἀνατίθεται φορτία (English: The mangy camel can tote the loads of many donkeys - so don't dismiss that camel, no matter how mangy she looks). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons (and anybody here on the LatinBestPractices list knows that I am doing this despite not being a fan of macrons, it's true...). So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 9: Dē Vulpe et Pardō, the story of the debate about beauty between the fox and the leopard.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE DELPHINO ET SMARIDE (the story of a dolphin who is not nearly as nice in the other dolphin story today; see below). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Arione et Delphino, an unexpected item in a book of Aesop's fables - although it is a wonderful animal story with a moral that fits right into the Aesopic tradition. Here's an illustration for the fable by Bouguereau which shows Arion on a kind of sea-horse, rather than a dolphin:






Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Round-Up: April 12

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Idus Apriles, which is the beginning of the Roman festival in honor of the goddess Ceres, the Cerealia. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S PODCAST:

Heri Hodie Cras Podcast: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 51, which features this saying with rhyme: Scopae recentiores semper meliores (Newer brooms are always better - much like the English "new brooms sweep clean").

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's a recent one which I really liked because of the rhyme: Dum canis os rodit, socium quem diligit odit (English: While a dog chews a bone, he hates the friend whom he once liked).

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Vaga est fortuna (English: Fortune is fickle). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Neminem riseris (English: Laugh at no one - a nice use of the perfect subjunctive for a negative imperative, a topic discussed recently on the LatinTeach list; this is advice you can find in the so-called Dicta Catonis).

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Ingenium superat vires (English: Intelligence beats brute force - a sentiment included in Whitney's Emblems).

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Nemo est qui semper vivat (Ecc. 9:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Leonis exuvium super asinum (English: A lion skin over a donkey - since it is normally Hercules who wears the lion skin, seeing a donkey skin on a lion would be incongruous at best - and woe betide the donkey who pretends to be a lion!).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Nestorea senecta (English: As old as Nestor - which is to say, very old indeed! According to some calculations, he was already over 100 years old when the Trojan War began.)

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐις Ἄρειον πάγος ἐκρίθη (English: It has been judged in the Areopagus - in other words, at the "Ares Hill" or "Hill of Mars," which was the high court of appeals for criminal and civil cases in ancient Athens). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Aesopus Ning: Fables with Macrons: By popular request, I'm marking up the fables from Barlow's Aesop with macrons. So, today's fable with macrons is Fābula 8: Dē Avibus et Quadrupedibus, the story of what the bat did during the war of the birds and beasts.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE VETULO ET MAGISTRO (the story of the old dog whose master no longer appreciated him). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page for this fable, where you will find links to the text, commentary, and a discussion board for questions and comments.

Florilegium Fabularum: I'm working my way, slowly but surely, through the amazing collection of fables by Irenaeus published in 1666. Today's fable is De Cervo et Bobus, the story of the stag who tried to hide in the oxen's stable. Here's an illustration for the fable from Barlow's Aesop:








Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.