Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Round-Up: March 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 30, which features this famous saying about theHoly Roman Emperor Sigismund: Caesar non supra grammaticos. (read the story).

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked about ineluctable fate: Multi ad fatum venere suum dum fata timent.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Camelum saltare doces (English: You're teaching a camel to dance - which, as we know from Aesop's fables, is not an effort destined to succeed). You can use the Javascript to include the Audio Latin Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Eloquentia sagitta (English: Eloquence is an arrow - a metaphor you can read about here). You can use the Javascript to include the Two-Word Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is E pluribus unum (English: From many, one - which you can see in the Seal of the United States). You can use the Javascript to include the Three-Word Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Omnes homines terra et cinis (Sirach 17:32). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate Verse of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. (For a nice polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, see the Sacred Texts Archive online.)

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Cornix aquilam provocat (English: The crow is harrassing the eagle... but since the crow can't do anything to the eagle, the crow just ends up looking foolish). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Titanas imploras (English: You're begging the Titans for help - just like Zeus himself had to ask the Titans for help in the battle with the Giants, striking a very dangerous bargain). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin Proper Name Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Θαλάτιος ὢν, μή πως χερσαῖος γένῃ (English: Since you are a man of the sea, you can't be a man of the land - another one of the proverbs about "mixing apples and oranges," although this time it has to do with human character, rather than with fruit!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CERVO IN BOVIUM STABULO (the story of the stag who hid in the oxen's stable). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is De Lepore et Testudine, the story of the race between the tortoise and the hare, with the fox as umpire.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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