Monday, March 16, 2009

Round-Up: March 16

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 29, which features this amusing item: Anulus aureus in naribus suis (careful with suis - it's the genitive of sus).

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked, since the weather is one of my favorite metaphors for life: Nunc pluit et claro nunc Iuppiter aethere fulget.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Fortuna gloriae carnifex (English: Fortune is the butcher of glory - a saying from Pliny's account of the Roman triumph). You can use the Javascript to include the Audio Latin Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Varia vita (English: Life is varied - a saying that is much more charming with the alliteration in the Latin). You can use the Javascript to include the Two-Word Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is Audio, sed taceo (English: I listen, but am silent - a family motto, as you can see here). You can use the Javascript to include the Three-Word Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Nolite condemnare, et non condemnabimini (Luke 6:37). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate Verse of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. (For a nice polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, see the Sacred Texts Archive online.)

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Durum tondere leonem (English: It's a hard task to shave the lion - in other words, be careful what you say to the "lions" in your life). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Est pax villana melior quam pugna Romana (English: A peace in the countryside is better than a Roman battle - a saying that plays on the proverbial opposition between Rome, the city of cities, and the countryside). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin Proper Name Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Βατράχῳ ὀινοχοεῖς (English: You're pouring water for a frog - which is to say, you're giving him something he has plenty of already). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek Proverb of the Day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE SENE ET MORTE (the story of the old man who thought he was ready to die). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is De Anu et Ansere, the story of the goose who laid the golden eggs.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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