Sunday, June 7, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 7

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives.

Here's another announcement: Michael Ginn wrote to let me know about a Latin Hangman game he has written which is available at the iTunes Store. I haven't played the game but it does have sheep! :-)

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Idus Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Diogenes and the Cup; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Capta maiora (English: Seize the greater things).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Mens opulentior auro (English: The mind is more splendid than gold).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Intereunt feles, celebrant convivia mures (English: The cats die; the mice hold a party).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Mutuum muli scabunt (English: One mule scratches another).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Lynceo perspicacior (English: More clear-sighted than Lynceus; from Adagia 2.1.54 — Lynceus was a legendary figure famous for his eyes; he supposedly invented mining for metals since he could see the silver and gold under the ground).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀιεὶ τὰ πέρυσι βελτίω (English: The things of yesteryear are always better).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Lites Vitandae. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Egomet sum mihi imperator.
I am my own boss.

Pecuniae imperare oportet, non servire.
You must be the master of money, not its slave.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Viatores et Pons, a funny story about mistaken identity — mistaken cheese identity (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Simia et Gemelli Eius, an Aesop's fable about the dangers of helicopter parenting.

Simia et Gemelli Eius

Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: ULTIMAM TIME.

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