Saturday, August 2, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Nonas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Labyrinth; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Ferendo feram (English: By bearing up, I will bear it).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Ex unguibus leonem (English: You know the lion by his claws).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Manus digiti coaequales non sunt, omnes tamen usui (English: The fingers of the hand are not equal, but all are useful). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quam miserum est, ubi consilium casu vincitur! (English: How wretched it is when a good plan is defeated by chance!).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Plaustrum bovem trahit (English: The cart is pulling the ox; from Adagia 1.7.28 - or, as we would say, the cart's before the horse!).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Omnibus Credas. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Talpa et Olitor, in which the gardener shows the mole no mercy (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Anguis et Milvus, a story of predatory karma.

Corvus et Serpens

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἀεὶ γεωργὸς εἰς νέωτα πλούσιος. Agricola semper in futurum dives est. The farmer is ever wealthy next year.

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