Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 30

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin, it's available (my project from summer of 2010); this is the source for the Latin fable below.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Odysseus and the Sirens; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Timor omnis abesto (English: Away with all fear).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Iacta alea est (English: The die is cast).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Dupliciter peccat, qui se de crimine iactat (English: Someone who boasts about his criminal deed is a sinner twice over).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Quae seminaverit homo, haec et metet (Gal. 6:7). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit: No man in the world is wise at al houres. It is only belonging to God and properly due unto him never to commit follie. There is, I say, no man, but otherwiles doteth, but is deceived, but plaieth the foole, though he seme never so wise. Whan I say man, I except not the woman.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dilectio Vera. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Leo et Tauri Duo, a famous story of "divide and conquer" (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus et Canis Saginatus, a story about freedom.

Canis et Lupus

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἀετὸν ἵπτασθαι διδάσκεις. Aquilam volare doces. You are teaching an eagle to fly.


Myth and Folklore Books. I'm accumulating some book recommendations for the classes I teach and wanted to share them here. Today's book is Philippine Folk-Tales by Clara Kern Bayliss; you can see the table of contents here. This is a free Amazon Kindle eBook, and you don't need a Kindle to read it - you can read Kindle books on any computer or mobile device, or you can use the Amazon Cloud Reader in your browser.




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