Friday, November 1, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 1

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Kalendae Novembres, the Kalends of November!

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Medea and the Daughters of Pelias; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Veritas praevalebit (English: The truth will prevail).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Remedium iniuriarum oblivio (English: Forgetting is the cure for injuries)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Stultus quoque, si tacuerit, sapiens reputabitur (English: The fool, too, if he can just keep quiet, will be considered a wise man). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quam miserum est, cum se renovat consumptum malum (English: How wretched it is when a problem which had run its course comes back ... man, that was the theme of my week this week!).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mus non uni fidit antro (English: A mouse cannot entrust itself to just one hole; from Adagia 5.1.4).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fortuna Pereunte. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mus in Olla, the story of a greedy mouse (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Struthiocamelus et Gallina, a story about a very foolish ostrich, as you can see:

Struthiocamelus Volans

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: εἰσελθὼν πρὸς αὐτὴν εἶπεν, χαῖρε. Ingressus angelus ad eam dixit: Ave! The angel came in unto her and said: Hail!


Myth and Folklore Books. I'm accumulating some book recommendations for the classes I teach and wanted to share them here. Today's book is Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll; you can see the table of contents here. This is a free Amazon Kindle eBook, and you don't need a Kindle to read it - you can read Kindle books on any computer or mobile device, or you can use the Amazon Cloud Reader in your browser.




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