Monday, December 31, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 31

On this eve of 2013, I hope everyone is looking forward to a great year to come! Vobis felicem atque faustum annum novum exopto!

For the coming year, I have two projects in mind. During the school year, I will be working away at the Latin distichs, adding the poster images and the English translations, too. There are now translations for the first 100 poems in the book; you can read more about the Brevissima materials here.  During the summer, I am planning something new: instead of working on a book project, I've decided to learn some real computer programming - Javascript and/or Python (I haven't decided yet) - in order to create some "generators" of my own. I'd like to make a "DIY Latin Motto Generator" for example, so that people with little or no Latin can have fun making their own Latin motto and learning something about Latin along the way. Since I am such a fan of meme generators like Automotivator and Icanhascheezburger, I think I will enjoy learning how to build my own generator!

HODIE (Roman Calendar): pridie Kalendas Ianuarias. I've also updated the Google Roman Calendar for 2013.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas Meeting Dido; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Annuit coeptis (English: He has favored our beginnings).


3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Bene qui sedulo (English: The man who works dilligently works well)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Asinus balneatoris numquam particeps balnei (English: The bathhouse-keeper's donkey never gets to have a bath). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Poena ad malum serpens, iam cum properat, venit (English: Punishment creeps up on the evil man, even when he's running away).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Vel capra mordeat nocentem (English: Even a goat will bite a criminal; from Adagia 1.8.97).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Amicus Falsus. Click here for a full-sized view; the poem has a vocabulary list and an English translation, too.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pulex et Homo, a story about a captured flea (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Equus Superbus et Asinus, a story in which a proud horse is brought low.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Auld Lang Syne, a Latin version of the Robert Burns song, along with In hoc anni circulo.

Saturday, December 29, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 29

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem quartum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Sabine Women Making Peace; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Virtute me involvo (English: I wrap myself in excellence).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Fama crescit eundo (English: Rumor grows as it goes along).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Today's 3-word proverb is Cum tumulum cernis, cur non mortalia spernis? (English: When you gaze on a tomb, why do you not reject mortal things?).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Stipendia peccati mors (Romans 6:23). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Ad Calendas Graecas: A proverbe signifiend never, bicause the Greekes had no kalendes.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Amici et Hostes. Click here for a full-sized view; the poem has a vocabulary list and an English translation, too.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Vulpes Sine Cauda, a funny story about the latest fox fashion (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vespertilio Perfidus, the story of the bat's treachery in a time of war.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Tinnitus, Tinnitus, a Latin version of "Jingle Bells," along with Christe, Redemptor Omnium and also O praesepe vile, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Ach, ubogi żłobie."

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Arachne; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Caveat emptor (English: Let the buyer beware).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Nihil sine labore (English: Nothing without hard work).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Nemo cum serpente securius ludit (English: No one can play really safely with a snake).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Corrumpunt bonos mores mala colloquia (English: Bad associations ruin good characters).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ilias malorum (English: An Iliad of troubles - the woes of Ilium being made famous in Homer's poem; from Adagia 1.3.26).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἄνθρωπος ἀνθρώπῳ δαιμόνιον (English: Man is a god to man).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dulcis Amice, Tene! Click here for a full-sized view; the poem has a vocabulary list and an English translation, too.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canis et Vultur, which features words of wisdom from a vulture (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Pisciculus et Piscator, in which a little fish pleads for his life.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Duodecim Dies Natalis, a Latin version of "The Twelve Days of Christmas," along with In noctis umbra desides and also Caelo ex excelso, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Z nieba wysokiego."

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Special Edition: Brevissima Poster Project




Now that I've got a whole year of Latin LOLCats done (more about that here), I've been pondering what new project to focus on in 2013. Since I am having so much fun with the Automotivator poster generator, I've decided to see if I can do poster images for all the poems in the Brevissima book from last summer. I really like the poems from that book and they all have very easy vocabulary, so I'm excited about this new way of sharing the poems. Here's what you can expect:

Poster Images. I'll be adding the poster images to the blog posts at the Brevissima site, where there is already a blog post for each poem in the book. I'm replacing the old images with the new poster images; so far, I've got 175 poster images in place.

Widget. I've also got a widget (of course!) that contains all of the posters, and I'll keep updating the widget as I create new ones.

English translations. In addition to the posters, I'm also adding English translations. The poems all have vocabulary lists already and they are not hard to read - but I know there are some people who want access to an English translation, too. In the hopes of getting people to work through the Latin first, I'm tucking the English translation down at the very bottom of each blog post. So far, you will find English translations for the first 75 poems in the book.

Book PDF. If you are enjoying these poems, I would urge you to download a copy of the complete book, given that it is going to take me a year or more to come up with posters and translations for all of the poems in the book. You can download a PDF copy of the book, or if you prefer you can browse and read the book online here. For people who like the left-right facing pages (poem on left, vocabulary on right) and the heft of a book in your hand, you can get a printed copy from Lulu.com.

Meanwhile, at the top and bottom of this blog post, you can see some random poster images - and if you are reading this via email or RSS, visit the blog post to see the random posters appear.




Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Dies Natalis Solis Invicti

Iucundissimum festum Nativitatis exopto, plenum laetitae atque felicitatis vobis et vestris.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Procul in Praesaepi, a Latin version of "Away in a Manger," along with Missus Gabriel de coelis and also Triumphi Regis, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Triumfy Króla niebieskiego."

Sunday, December 23, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Narcissus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Altius tendo (English: I aim higher).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Nihil diu occultum (English: Nothing remains long hidden)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas (English: The censor forgives the crows and harasses the doves). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Quod est venturum, sapiens ut praesens cavet (English: The wise man guards against what is to come as if it were already here).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mortuo leoni et lepores insultant (English: Even rabbits insult the dead lion; from Adagia 4.7.82).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Amicitia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Gallus et Ancillae, a wonderful fable about unintended consequences (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Avarus et Fur, a financial fable about a miser and his life's savings.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Veni, Veni, Emmanuel!, along with Flos de radice Jesse and also O Stella de Bethlehem, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "O gwiazdo Betlejemska."

Friday, December 21, 2012

Special Edition: A Year of Latin LOLCats

I've now got enough Latin LOLCat images to make a "Latin LOLCat" of the day widget! You can get more information about using the widget at the Latin LOLCat Reference Page. Here is the Latin LOLCat for today (if you are reading this via email or RSS, you might need to click through to the blog post to see the cat of the day):



In addition, I've created a Flickr gallery of all the LOLCat images; here's a slideshow:

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Zeus and Semele; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Quod potes, tenta (English: Attempt what you are able to do).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Medice, cura teipsum (English: Physician, heal yourself).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Quisquis amat ranam, ranam putat esse Dianam (English: He who loves a frog thinks that frog is the goddess Diana).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Comede in laetitia panem tuum et bibe cum gaudio vinum tuum (Ecc. 9:7). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Nec omnia, nec passim, nec ab omnibus: Neither all thinges, nor in al places, nor of all men. This Proverbe teacheth us, that in takinge of rewardes, wee shewe oure selves not only shamefast, but also ware and circumspecte. For there be some thinges, whiche is not seminge for a man to take. There is also a place and time, that it where much better for one to refuse the gifte that is offered than to take it. And againe there be some, of whom it is no honestie, to receive anie gifte..

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Nil Amicitia Gratius. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Membra et Venter, the famous fable of the body's revolt against the belly (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cocleae et Puer, the story of the snails cooking in the fire.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Silens Nox, a Latin version of "Silent Night," along with Hodie Christus natus est and also Usque Bethlehem, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Do Betlejem pełni radości."

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Seven Against Thebes; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Pulsanti aperietur (English: It will be opened to the one who knocks).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Citius, altius, fortius (English: Faster, higher, and stronger - the motto of the Olympics).



ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Praebet candoris lac nigri vacca coloris (English: The cow who is black proffers milk that is white).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nolite iudicare secundum faciem (English: Don't judge based on appearances).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Sero sapiunt Phryges (English: The Phrygians get wise too late - the Phyrgians here are the Trojans who learned too late that they never should have let that wooden horse inside their walls; from Adagia 1.1.28).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Λύκος ποιμήν (English: The wolf as shepherd - something like putting the fox in charge of the hen house!).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Omnibus Annis. Click here for a full-sized view.



And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Equus Circensis Molae Iugatus, the sad story of the aged racehorse (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Mulus et Equus, the story of a mule who learns that glory is not all it's cracked u to be.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Tres Naves, a Latin version of "I Saw Three Ships," along with Quem Pastores Laudavere and also Fratres, en spectate, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Bracia, patrzcie jeno!"

Monday, December 17, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Ajax and Cassandra; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Irrideo tempestatem (English: I scoff at the storm).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Dei omnia plena (English: All things are full of God)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Fames optimus est coquus (English: Hunger is the best cook). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: aucorum improbitas est multorum calamitas (English: The wickedness of a few is a disaster for many).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Colubrum in sinu foves (English: You're nourishing a snake close to your breast - which means you are likely to be its first victim; from Adagia 4.2.40).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Adversa Caveto. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Monedula Liberata, a story about the perils of freedom (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Nux Secundum Viam Sata, the sad story of a much-abused and under-appreciated nut tree.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Orientis Reges Tres, a Latin version of "We Three Kings of Orient Are," along with Nascitur cum Christus, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Gdy się Chrystus rodzi."

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 15

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem duodevicesimum Kalendas Ianuarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Scylla; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Fac aut tace (English: Do, or be silent).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Certa praestant incertis (English: Sure things are preferable to things that are not sure).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Quid pectunt illi, quibus absunt fronte capilli? (English: What's the point of combing, when men lack hair on their foreheads?).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Isaiah 1:17 (Discite benefacere; quaerite iudicium). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Graculo cum fidibus nihil: The Jaye hath nought to doe with the harpe, spoken of them which lacking eloquence or good letters, do skorne them that have good learning.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sic Mihi Vita. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Simia et Gemelli Eius, a story about a helicopter mother, monkey-style (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo et Equus, a story in which the old lion is sneaky, but the horse is even sneakier.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Canticum Turbonis, a Latin version of "The Dreidel Song" in honor of the end of Hanukkah this weekend, along with Somnio Candidum Diem, a Latin version of "White Christmas," and Dormi Jesu.

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you have not downloaded a free PDF copy of Brevissima: 1001 Tiny Latin Poems, it's ready and waiting, and you can also get a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin. If you prefer the heft of a book in your hand, you can get the books in printed form from Lulu.com.

HODIE: Idus Decembres, the Ides of December.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Diomedes and Glaucus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Fluctus numeras (English: You are counting the waves - which is a fool's errand, of course!).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Secundis dubiisque rectus (English: In prosperity and uncertainty, upright).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Fele absente, mures choreas ducunt (English: When the cat is away, the mice dance).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Leges bonae ex malis moribus procreantur (English: Good laws are born of bad habits).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Nunc pluit, et claro nunc Iuppiter aethere fulget (English: Now Jupiter rains, and now he shines forth from the clear sky; from Adagia 1.8.65 - a saying which shows the association of the sky-god Jupiter and the weather).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Τέφραν φεύγων, εἰς ἀνθρακιὰν ἔπεσον (English: Avoiding the ashes, I fell into the hot coals).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Hora Nulla Sine Fructu . Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mus in Cista Natus, a wonderful story about life's horizons (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Monedula Liberata, a sad story of slavery and freedom.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Sit Prosperus Iesus Nati, a Latin version of "We Wish You a Merry Christmas," along with Corde Natus Ex Parentis and also Cunis iacet, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "W żłobie leży."

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 11

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Idus Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Dionysus and Ariadne; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Facio iusta (English: I do what is just).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Sua cuique hora (English: To each his own time)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Lupus in fabula (English: The wolf in conversation). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Ubi peccat aetas maior, male discit minor (English: When the older generation makes mistakes, the younger learns a bad lesson).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Non missura cutem, nisi plena cruoris hirudo. The leech won't let go of your skin until it's full of blood (English: XXX; from Adagia 2.4.84).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Temporibus Suis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here is today's proverbial lolcat:



TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Sol et Stellae, a story about true glory (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Testudo, Aquila, et Corvus, a story about an unfortunate tortoise, defeated by the eagle and the crow.

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Personent hodie, a medieval Latin hymn, and also Dormi iam, mi Jesu, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Lulajże Jezuniu." Plus... Avia Renone Calcabatur, from the the "Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer" song.

Sunday, December 9, 2012

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: December 9

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I'm almost making good progress on my latest project - you can see the growing collection of Latin-vocabulary-via-proverbs at the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Idus Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Danaids; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Sapiens non eget (English: The wise man does not lack anything).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Optima citissime pereunt (English: The best things pass away the most quickly).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Qui bene vult fari, debet bene praemeditari (English: He who wants to speak well should plan his words carefully).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Omnia probate; quod bonum est, tenete (I Thess. 5:21). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Domum cum facis ne relinquas impolitam: When thou makest an house leave it not unfinished. By this we be bidden, that what so ever matter or affayres wee once beginne, wee bryng the same to a perfecte and full ende.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Sic Vult Ire. Click here for a full-sized view.



And here is today's proverbial lolcat:


TODAY'S FABLES AND SONGS:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Vulpes et Uva, the famous story of the not-so-sour grapes (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus et Puer Mendax, which is another very famous table - "the boy who cried wolf."

LATIN HOLIDAY SONGS: The Latin holiday songs for today are: Regis Olim Urbe David, a special carol for children, along with In natali Domini and also Cari pastores, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Pasterze mili."