Sunday, March 15, 2009

Round-Up: March 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 28, which features this very profound pair of sayings: In labore libertas and In libertate labor.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I selected especially for Twitter-use POTUS: Furtivus potus plenus dulcedine totus.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Aut rex aut asinus (English: Either a king or a donkey - a proverb that alludes to how you are born into this world, as a king or a donkey). You can use the Javascript to include the audio Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is Asinus compluitur (English: The donkey can be rained on - a proverb that refers to the donkey's thick skin, and how he can put up with anything, uncomplaining). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Qui corripit hominem, gratiam postea inveniet apud eum (Proverbs 28:23). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate verse of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. (For a nice polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, see the Sacred Texts Archive online.)

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Ire catenatus nescit canis inveteratus (English: An old dog doesn't know how to go about on a leash - a Latin variation on not being able to teach an old dog new tricks). You can use the Javascript to include the Animal Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Noctuas Athenas affert (English: He's carrying owls to Athens - the ancient equivalent of carrying coals to Newcastle). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proper name proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τότ' ᾄδονται κύκνοι, ὅταν κολοιοὶ σιωπήσωσιν (English: The swans will sing when the jackdaws fall silent - a kind of "hell freezes over" for the birds). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is De Cane et Umbra, the story of the greedy dog who was fooled by his own reflection.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE ET AQUILA (the story of what happened when the eagle stole the fox's pups). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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