Monday, February 23, 2009

Round-Up: February 23

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Lupo et Agno, the famous story of the wolf and the lamb at the stream.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a fine fable about those wily foxes: Vulpeculorum mutantur pili, non mores.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Gloria cuique sua est (English: To each his own glory - a very optimistic variation on the traditional "to each his own" saying). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Μέγα τὸ στομα τοῦ ἐνιαυτοῦ (English: One year's mouth is big - a good saying for me to keep in mind as I celebrate my birthday later this week!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE RUSTICO ET SILVA (the story of the trees who were their own worst enemy). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 38: De Gallo Gallinaceo, the story of the rooster who found a treasure in the manure.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning blog: De Cupidine et Morte, an obscure little Aesop's fable about what happened when Cupid and Death got their arrows mixed up.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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