Sunday, February 22, 2009

Round-Up: February 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Tubicine Captivo, the story of the trumpeter who was held as a prisoner of war.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: Cui multum est piperis, etiam oleribus immiscet (this definitely works for me, being very fond of my vegetables, and very prone to pepper them!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Stultus in tenebris ambulat (English: The fool walks in the shadows - in other words, he does not have the light of wisdom to guide him!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐν παισὶ μὴν γέρων, ἐν δὲ γέρουσι παῖς (English: An old man when amidst the children, and amidst the old men a child - I think that's a great saying for those of us who have cross-generational jobs, like my job as a teacher!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE ET PARDO (a debate about beauty between a fox and a leopard, who certainly does not want to change his spots!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Alciatus - Emblemata: Here is the Alciato emblem for this week: Alciato CIV: In astrologos, the story of Icarus interpreted as a warning to astrologers or anyone else with celestial ambitions You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

No comments: