Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Round-Up: February 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Cane et Umbra, the famous story of the dog fooled by his own reflection in the water.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked about good and bad luck: Fors omnia versat.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Excelsior (English: Higher! - it may just be a one-word motto, but it is still a great one!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Κύων εἰς τόν ἴδιον ἔμετον (English: The dog returns to his vomit - something which is indeed literally true of dogs, and which has all kinds of metaphorical applications... none of them very pleasant, but that doesn't make them any the less true...). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 40: De Asino Leonis Pelle Induto, the story of the donkey who dressed himself up as a lion!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE RUSTICO ET ARATRO SUO (the story of how god - in this case Hercules - helps those that help themselves). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments. You can see Hercules up there in the heaven dressed in his own lion skin if you look closely!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

No comments: