Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Round-Up: February 18

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Leone et Urso, the story of how the sly fox outfoxed both the bear and the lion!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: Sedulo numen adest (since I was VERY sedula today, that was encouraging!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Paulum lucri, quantum damni (English: So little profit, so much loss - a saying adapted from the Roman comic playwright, Terence). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Γλῶσσα βλάσφημος διανοίας κακῆς ἔλεγχος (English: A mean tongue is an indicator of a wicked mind - a saying sadly full of wisdom, at least in my experience of the world!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CORNICE ET URNA (a wonderful metaphor for language-learning, word by word, pebble by pebble). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 34: De Cervo in Bovium Stabulo, the story of the stag who tried to escape the master's eye by hiding in the stable. As you can see from the illustration, he did not succeed!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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