Thursday, February 19, 2009

Round-Up: February 19

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Alauda et Pullis Eius, the story of the lark and her chicks.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: Plebs bene vestitum stultum putat esse peritum (it goes nicely with today's Latin proverb of the day, too!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Non faciunt meliorem equum aurei freni (English: Golden reins do not make a better horse - a saying with all kinds of great metaphorical connotations, a more pointed application than "don't judge a book by its cover"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Γέρων ἀλώπηξ οὐχ ἁλίσχεται πάγῃ (English: An old fox is not caught in the snare... a saying I have to hope is true, being an old fox myself!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ACCIPITRE ET LUSCINIA (the sad story of the nightingale caught by the hawk). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 35: De Rustico et Colubro, the story of the man who foolishly brought a snake into his house.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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