Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Round-Up: February 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Vulpe, Cane et Gallo, the story of how the rooster, with help from the dog, outfoxed the fox.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: De glande fit ardua quercus (our yard was FULL of acorns this year... I wonder which if any will fulfill the grand scheme of this proverb!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Forma raro cum sapientia (English: Brains together with beauty are rare - and as a short person, I'll invoke a famous parallel proverb, Homo longus raro sapiens - ha!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about both of these Latin proverbs, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Νεφελας ξαίνεις (English: You're thrashing at clouds - something like tilting at windmills!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE MURE URBANO ET MURE RUSTICO (the famous story of the city mouse and the country mouse). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments - plus audio and video, too!

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 33: De Sene et Morte, the story of the old man who recklessly summoned Death!

Alciatus - Emblemata: Here is the Alciato emblem for this week: Alciato LXIV: In eum qui sibi damnum apparat, the story of the nanny-goat forced to suckle a wolf-cub! You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

No comments: