Monday, February 16, 2009

Round-Up: February 16

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Leone et Vulpe, the story of the lion who thought he could outfox the fox... but he was wrong!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked: Frangit inertia vires (it's a good warning for those of us who are tempted to lounge around all weekend long, ha ha).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Facile omnes cum valemus recta consilia aegrotis damus (English: We all find it easy to give the right advice to the sick when we are well - a very wise fable about the need for empathy whenever you are giving advice!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Μὴ πρὸς ἐμὲ τὰ ποικίλα (English: Don't ever try fancy tricks on me - with the Greek word ποικίλα having all kinds of negative connotations here; there was something about being variegated or multicolored that made the Greeks suspicious! I cannot think of an English word that conveys negative connotations through the same metaphor - something like "fancy footwork" perhaps!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE PARTU MONTIUM (the story of the mountains who gave birth to a mouse - the same fable I made the video for yesterday, as it happens!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 32: De Columbis et Accipitre, the story of the doves who foolishly elected the hawk to be their king.

Aesop Audio-Video. I've got one more new Aesop audio-video. This time it is Fable 4: Mus Urbanus et Mus Rusticus, the famous story of the country mouse and teh citiy mouse. If you are reading this through email or RSS, you might need to visit the blog to see the video actually playing!


Find more videos like this on LATIN VIA FABLES: AESOPUS



Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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