Monday, January 19, 2009

Round-Up: January 19

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Verbosum: Latin Vocabulary: I've posted a vocabulary-building note about some of my favorite Latin words and their (perhaps) surprising etymologies: bruma, debeo, insulsus.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked, an optimistic ecological proverb: Serimus arbores quae saeculo prosint alteri.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Suus cuique crepitus bene olet (English: To each person his own his fart smells nice - what you could call the "Animal House" version of the famous saying, "to each his own"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Μωρὸς σιωπᾷν οὐ δύναται (English: The fool is not able to keep his mouth shut... something like the English piece of advice: Better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE ET UMBRA (the famous story of the dog fooled by his own reflection in the water). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 5: Cornix et Urna, the story of the wise crow who wanted to get a drink of water.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Vulpecula et Ciconia, the story of how the stork managed to "outfox" the fox.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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