Sunday, January 18, 2009

Round-Up: January 18

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Accipitre Columbam Insequente, a story that illustrates the Golden Rule.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked, a bit of medieval advice that is very good for avoiding colds and flu in winter time: Si fore vis sanus, ablue saepe manus.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is In caput auctoris facinus plerumque redundat. (English: A crime often comes back to hit the doer in the head - this is a kind of Latin "karma"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄλλοι κάμον, ἄλλοι δ' ὤναντο (English: There are those who labored, and those who took the profit - another saying about the economic injustice of the world!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences). Today's Simplified fable is Fable 4: Mus Urbanus et Mus Rusticus, the story of the city mouse and the country mouse, a fable in praise of the life, rather than a life of greed and risk.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE EQUO ET LEONE (a great story about how when the lion tried to trick the horse, he was out-tricked himself - and it really did come back to hit him on the head, just like in today's Latin proverb!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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