Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Round-Up: January 20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Latin Links: I'm tagging Latin resources online with Del.icio.us, and you can see the links here, with the newest ones listed at the top. Any suggestions of more good Latin language links to add to the list would be much appreciated! Thanks to Evan Millner for alerting me to all the Renaissance Latin books at the Europeana Digital Library!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Leone Amatorio, the marvelous story of the lion in love and the terrible things that happened to him as a result!

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked, which I'm' sure many readers of this blog can relate to: Distrahit animum librorum multitudo.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Tempus it et tamquam mobilis aura volat (English: Time goes and like a moving breeze it flies - a figurative variation on the proverbial "time flies"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ὀυκ ἂν αὖθις ἀλώπηξ. (English: The fox will not a second time - an elliptical saying that means, "The fox will not [be caught in the same trap] a second time."). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ANU ET ANSERE (the famous story of the goose that laid the golden eggs!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 6: Accipiter et Luscinia, the story of the nightingale who was caught by a hawk.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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