Sunday, January 11, 2009

Round-Up: January 11

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Proverbiis Pipilo: As you can guess, teaching online courses, I'm online a lot of the time... so now I am twittering Latin proverbs, or proverbiis pipilo. You can follow the Latin proverbs at Twitter. :-)

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Aliud ex alio malum (English: One bad thing from another - a great proverb to use in remembering the neuter singular form, aliud). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πλείους προσκυνοῦσι τὸν ἥλιον ἀνατέλλοντα ἢ δύνοντα (English: More people praise the sun as it rises than when it is setting... which is a profound but very pessimistic proverb when you think about it!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VULPE, CANE ET GALLO (a story in which a fox is not able to outsmart a bird up in a tree, as she did in the famous story of the crow and the cheese - this time, the rooster is triumphant!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 77: Ranae et Earum Rex, the story of the frogs and their kings.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Vas Fictile et Vas Ferreum, a Latin rendering of LaFontaine's fable of the two pots.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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