Saturday, January 10, 2009

Round-Up: January 10

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Alciatus - Emblemata: Here is the Alciato emblem for this week: Alciato L: Dolus in suos, the story of a decoy who betrays his own flock to the fowlers. You can use the Javascript to include the emblem of the week automatically each day on your webpage or blog (or you can display the 52 emblems at random).

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 11, which includes this great saying, suitable for all such eccentrics as myself (and perhaps some of my readers, too, eh?): Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Vitrea est fortuna (English: Fortune is made of glass - in other words: it shatters easily... and on that subject, I would highly recommend a great film, "Shattered Glass," about journalism in the post-truth world, as some have called it). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πάτταλος παττάλῳ προσκρούεται (English: One peg is struck by another - πάσσαλος might be the form of the Greek word you recognize more readily). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE ET VULPE (the story of how the fox "outfoxed" the ailing lion). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 76: Herinacei Viperas Hospites Eiicientes, the sad story of the generous vipers and the truly wicked little hedgehogs!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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