Monday, January 12, 2009

Round-Up: January 12

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog: a link to some FABULOUS Latin fables read out loud by Evan Millner, of the Latinum podcast.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Vulgate Verses: Group 6, which includes this marvelous simile: Praecordia fatui quasi rota carri..

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Medico male est, si nemini male est (English: The doctor's bad off, if nobody is bad off - a great indictment of our medical system even today, with so many people making money off of other people being sick!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Δὶς παῖδες οἱ γέροντες (English: Old folks are children a second time... a saying that is very famous in Latin, too: bis pueri senes). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE ET URSO (the wonderful fable of how the fox outfoxed both the lion and the bear!). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 78: Rana et Vulpes, the story of the frog physician who needs to learn the lesson of "Physician, heal thyself!"




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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