Friday, January 9, 2009

Round-Up: January 9

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Comenius - Lexicon Project: EXCITING NEWS - Evan Millner is digitizing Comenius's Lexicon Januale, not available online anywhere else, in conjunction with the larger work on the Lexicon Atriale. The Januale is a beginner's dictionary that focuses on word formation (sample). Wow! For those of you who would like to get involved, you can find out more at the Lexicon wiki, which also includes easy step by step instructions for getting started. Thanks to everybody who has been helping out with this!

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog, "Aesop in Australian Reasons for Judgment" - an online paper by a retired Australian judge who has been tracking the use of Aesop's fables in judicial decisions! How cool!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Fabula: De Rustico et Aratro Suo, a story about how a god - Hercules - helps those who help themselves.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Patria mea totus mundus est (English: My fatherland is the whole world - a very "cosmopolitan" saying!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὰ ἐν χερσὶ κρατούμενα, μείζονά ἐστι τῶν προσδοκωμένων (English: Things held firmly in hand are better than things hoped for in the future - an abstract way of saying that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE SENE (the story of how the old lion's past came back to haunt him in the form of a donkeky's hooves). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 75: Catta in Feminam Mutata, the marvelous story of the Venus, and a man's beloved cat. (If you look closely, you can see Cupid driving Venus's celestial chariot!)




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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