Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Round-Up: December 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Gaudium Mundo: Latin Christmas Carols. Thanks to the wonderful generosity of Aleksandra Klęczar at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland, I've been able to add 24 more Latin Christmas carols to the Gaudium Mundo site! The carol tradition is very strong in Poland, and I was able to find YouTube videos and online MIDI files for almost all of these songs, so even if you do not know Polish you can sing along to the melodies using the Latin words!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 4, which includes this great saying: Libri muti magistri sunt.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Non omnes sancti qui calcant limina templi (English: Not all are holy who tread the threshold of the temple - a great saying about any kind of hypocrisy, not just the religious variety). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐν τοῖς τόποις τυφλῶν λάμων βασιλεύει (English: In the places of the blind, the blear-eyed man is king - the word λάμων there is a variant of γλάμων). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE AMATORIO (the sad story of the lion in love). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 49: Alauda et Pulli Eius, the story of the lark, her chicks and the farmer.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Gaudete (a 16th-century Latin carol which became a hit single in the 1970s for the band Steeleye Span). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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