Thursday, December 18, 2008

Round-Up: December 18

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Verbosum: Latin Vocabulary: I've started working my way through the Aesop's fables vocabulary systematically now that the book is done! To start, I've posted a vocabulary-building note about adjectives formed with -bundus and -cundus (as in the most famous English derivative in this group, "moribund").

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is De Cornice et Urna, the story of the thirsty crow and the pot of water (I like to use this fable as a metaphor for learning a language, one word at a time!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Alter frenis, alter eget calcaribus (English: One person has need of reins, another of spurs - and if you divide the world up into these two groups, I definitely belong to the group needing reins, not spurs!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Βίος ἀνεόρταστος, μακρὴ ὁδὸς ἀπανδόκευτος (English: Life without holidays is long, just as the road without hospitality is long... and yes, I am definitely looking forward to the upcoming winter holidays, much needed!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE EQUO ET ASINO (a story about the horse and the humble donkey, in praise of the simple life). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 52: Tubicen Captivus, an Aesop's fable about "non-combatants" in wartime (civilian contractors, take heed!).

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Quem Pastores Laudavere (the "Quempas" carol, as it is often called, based on its Latin name). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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