Sunday, February 28, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: February 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Martias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Hylas and the Nymphs; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Finem prospiciens (English: With an eye on the goal).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Nil homini certum (English: For man, nothing is certain).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Labor gloriae pater (English: Hard work is the father of fame). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Non novit virtus calamitati cedere (English: Courage does not know how to yield to disaster).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Asinus balneatoris (English: The bathkeeper's donkey; from Adagia 4.4.50 — this proverbial donkey brings the water for other people's baths, but he never gets to enjoy a bath himself).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tempora Praetereunt. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too. See the sundial below for a similar sentiment but with a different metaphor! Not "more fluentis aquae" but "quasi umbra."


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Dulce otium.
Leisure is sweet.

Nos duo turba sumus.
We two are a crowd.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pisciculus et Piscator, a story about a bird in the hand... except it's a fish (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cantus Sacerdotis, a hilarious medieval fable about a dear departed donkey.

Sacerdos Cantans

Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog post: Dies nostri quasi umbra super terram et nulla est mora. Our days on the earth are as a shadow, and there is none abiding.

No comments: