Thursday, April 2, 2015

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 2

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Nonas Apriles.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Hesione; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Ditior Croeso (English: Richer than Croesus).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Audacter et aperte (English: Boldly and openly).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Testudo collecta in suum tegimen tuta est (English: The turtle gathered inside its shell is safe).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Ad Calendas Graecas (English: On the Greek Calends ... which is to say: never — the Calends are Roman, not Greek).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Evitata Charybdi in Scyllam incidi (English: Having avoided Charybdis, I've fallen into Scylla; from Adagia 1.5.4).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἰχθὺν νήχεσθαι διδάσκεις (English: You're teaching a fish to swim... which is a fool's errand of course!).

And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




Scientia sol mentis.
Knowledge is the light of the mind.

Metuo secundis.
I fear when things are going well.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Simia et Piscatores, the story of the foolish monkey who wanted to go fishing (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Harundo et Quercus, a story about how it is better to bend rather than snap.

quercus et arundo

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable... and it is the last of the wonderful collection of 60 fables which Justin recorded: Vulpes, Agnus, et Canis , with links to the audio and to the blog post.

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