Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 8

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem octavum Idus Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Aeneas Meeting Dido; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Tandem tranquillus (English: At last, tranquil).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Dubium sapientiae initium (English: Doubt is the beginning of wisdom).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ut flatus venti, sic transit gloria mundi (English: Like a puff of wind, so passes the glory of the world). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Deliberandum est saepe, statuendum est semel (English: Think about something often; make your decision once).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Crocodili lachrimae (English: Crocodile tears - a saying that is still alive and well in English; from Adagia 2.4.60).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Lingua Una, Aures Duae. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Avarus et Aureorum Sacculus, a wonderful story about a miser and his talking money-bag (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ranae et Sol, an Aesopic fable about global warming.

Ranae et Sol

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἀγροίκου μὴ καταφρόνει ῥήτορος. Agrestem ne contemnas oratorem. Do not scorn a backwoods speaker.

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