Monday, April 28, 2014

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: April 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for more fables to read (LOTS more fables), you can download a free PDF copy of Mille Fabulae et Una: 1001 Aesop's Fables in Latin.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Maias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Hera, Zeus, and Io; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Non nobis nascimur (English: We are not born for ourselves alone).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Necessitati parendum est (English: Necessity must be obeyed).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Te modicum iacta, quoniam probat exitus acta (English: Keep your boasting within limits, since it is the outcome which commends your deeds).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Vade retro me, Satana (Mark 8:33). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Omnia idem pulvis: Al is one self dust or asshes. From earth wee came, and to earth wee shall. Yea the scripture saith that asshes wee be, and to asshes we shall reverte. Nowe amongest asshes or dust I pray you, what greate difference is ther? How will ye discerne the asshes of a Kinge, or an Emperour, of a Duke, of a great Bishop, from the asshes of a cobler, yea of a begger.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dies Longa. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Canes et Corium, the story of some dogs who were both hungry and foolish.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Pirata et Alexander Rex, which is one of my very favorite anecdotes about Alexander the Great (this fable has a vocabulary list).


Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: οἱ δὲ υἱοὶ Ισραηλ ἔφαγον τὸ μαν ἔτη τεσσαράκοντα. Filii Israël comederunt man quadraginta annis. The children of Israel did eat manna forty years.




No comments: