Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Polyxena at the Well; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Veritas vincet (English: The truth will be victorious).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Labor gloriae pater (English: Effort is the father of glory).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ex pede Herculem (English: You know Hercules by his foot). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Discipulus est prioris posterior dies (English: The day after is the student of the day before).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Cauda tenes anguillam (English: You're trying to hold an eel by the tail - which is to say, you have barely got hold of it at all; from Adagia 1.4.94).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Difficilia Quae Pulchra. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:




TODAY'S FABLES:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Cervus et Vitis, a fable about an ungrateful stag.

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Quercus et Iuppiter, the story of the trees who were their own worst enemy (this fable has a vocabulary list).

Arbores et Securis

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἄλλοι μὲν σπείρουσι, ἄλλοι δ᾽ ἀμήσονται. Alii serunt, alii metent. There are those who sow, others who will reap.


Myth and Folklore Books. I'm accumulating some book recommendations for the classes I teach and wanted to share them here. Today's book is Le Morte D'Arthur and the Mabinogion by Beatrice Clay; you can see the table of contents here. This is a free Amazon Kindle eBook, and you don't need a Kindle to read it - you can read Kindle books on any computer or mobile device, or you can use the Amazon Cloud Reader in your browser.




2 comments:

Sweedie-The-Cat said...

Please:
For those of us who know no latin, but none-the-less are fascinated by the era, the mottos, the sayings, etc... Might I suggest a way to make things even better?
Could you not put the English translations below your made-up posters, graphics, pictures, etc?
That would help us learn, and get more pleasure.
I often tweet 3-4 of your things out, always followed by one tweet that says: For more, go see... And the Page URL. It might get you a few subscribers, viewers, supporters. Thank you.

Laura Gibbs said...

Hi Sweedie, my main goal is to help people who are learning Latin, and the only way to learn Latin - to REALLY learn it - is to let go of English. But I am also happy if the blog can be fun to read for people who are not Latin students. So I try to keep a kind of middle balance between the two. I give the English translations for some things, but for some things, my goal is really to create Latin things.