Sunday, June 3, 2012

Round-Up: June 3

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. On alternating days this summer, I'm posting a separate disticha round-up, too!

HODIE: ante diem tertium Nonas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Faustulus Finding Romulus and Remus; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Praevide, ne praeveniare (English: Foresee so that you are not forestalled).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Danda venia lapso (English: You should forgiven someone who has slipped up).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Sunt asini multi solum bino pede fulti (English: There are many donkeys, except that they stand on two legs).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Nonne ad unum locum properant omnia? (Ecc. 6:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Bos in lingua: A proverbe touchinge them which dare not speake the truth, or will not bicause they have receaved money to holde their peace. For the Athenienses used a certayne coyne of money with an oxe figured thereon.

TODAY'S FABLES and STORIES:

ANECDOTE OF THE DAY: Today's anecdote is Utrum Anchilles an Homerus, containing the wise words of Themistocles, the great Athenian general and politician.

FABULAE FACILES WIDGET: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canis Aquam Timens, a fable on the theme of "once bitten, twice shy" (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE WIDGET: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Lupus et Sus, the story of the wolf who wanted to play midwife to the sow.

MILLE FABULAE: The "chunk" of Mille Fabulae et Una today is Fable 921, Viatores Iuxta Maris Litus, through Fable 930, Pater et Filii Litigantes, including Viatores Duo et Bipennis, a fable about first-person singular v. first-person plural: Duo una iter faciebant; horum unus repertam bipennem sustulit. Tum alter hortabatur, ne sic loqueretur ut diceret, ‘Ego bipennem inveni,’ sed sic, ‘Nos invenimus.’ Hoc ei, qui sustulerat bipennem, non persuadebatur. Mox visis quibusdam, qui se insequerentur cum clamore et concitato cursu, esse eos qui amisissent bipennem coniiciens, “Periimus,” inquit. At alter “Dices,” inquit, “nunc quoque ‘perii,’ non ‘periimus’ - quippe cum ‘invenimus’ nolueris dicere, sed ‘inveni.’”

Viatores et Securis

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