Thursday, September 30, 2010

Myths & Legends: Sept. 30 - Oct. 6

Sept. 23-29 - Sept. 30 - Oct. 6 - Oct. 7-13

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Arachne. To find out more about Arachne, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Death of Niobe's Children. To find out more about the boastful Niobe, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Heracles and Antaeus. To find out more about the giant Antaeus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Oedipus and the Sphinx. To find out more about the Oedipus and the riddles of the Sphinx, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Venus, Vulcan and the Armor of Aeneas. To find out more about Aeneas and his mother Venus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Alcestis Takes the Place of Admetus. To find out more about Alcestis, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Jason Delivers the Golden Fleece. To find out more about Jason's question for the Golden Fleece, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Round-Up: September 30

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

EVAN MILLNER'S AESOP. I'm sure many of you are familiar with Evan Millner's wonderful work with the Latinum podcast and his current work developing Latin videos at YouTube. He sent me a note today about his latest series of videos, Lectiones Primae, which feature some Aesop's fables. Take a look/listen!

HODIE: pridie Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is VIDEO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Aliud aliis videtur optimum, "To some people one thing seems best, to other people, some other thing."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots more illustrated fables, including this lovely illustration from the Medici Aesop for a Fortuna fable. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Musca et Quadrigae, the story of a fly with a very high opinion of himself.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Cocleae et Puer , the story of the boy who was cooking some snails.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange, Wright's translation of La Fontaine and Pratt's Aesop for children.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Secundum naturam vivo (English: I live according to nature).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Quod tuum, tene (English: Hold on to what is yours).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Contra vim mortis non est medicamen in hortis (English: Against the power of death there is no remedy in the garden).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Stultus verba multiplicat (Ecc. 10:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Principium dimidium totius: The beginninge is halfe the hole. There be manie greate delayers. Longe they be ere they can be perswaded to set upon an honest act, so manie perils they cast. To morrow, to morrow they say wee will begin, but this to morrow is ever comming but never present, wherfore who so with good courage ventureth uppon his matters, hat alredy half done.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from the rhyming couplets collected by Wegeler, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Irritare canem noli dormire volentem,
Nec moveas iram post tempora longa latentem.
English: "Do not awake a dog who wants to sleep, and do not reawaken anger after it has been hidden for a long time." The wonderful rhymes here make this a very nice version of our more pedestrian "Let sleeping dogs lie" in English.

Today's image is Barlow's illustration for 829. Rusticus et Coluber. Rusticus repertum in altiori nive colubrum, frigore prope enectum, domum tulit et ad focum adiecit. Coluber, ab igni vires virusque recipiens et non amplius flammam ferens, totum tugurium sibilando infecit. Accurrit rusticus et, correpta sude, verbis verberibusque cum eo iniuriam expostulat, “Num haec est quam retulit gratia, eripiendo vitam illi cui vitam debuit?” (source)

rusticus et coluber

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Myths and Legends: Athena and Poseidon


Athena and Poseidon. To find out more about the contest between Athena and Poseidon, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

You can see the rival gods Athena and Poseidon facing off here - Athena has her owl, of course, and Poseidon can be recognized his trident. Meanwhile, be sure to notice the female Sphinx on the pillar between them - quite an image! You can find out more about this Etruscan vase painting at this informative Louvre webpage.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 23 - September 29 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Round-Up: September 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is AUTEM - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Alios potes effugere, te autem numquam, "You can flee others; you can never flee yourself."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots of new illustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Viatores Duo et Latro, a fable about "share and share alike."

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Venator Meticulosus, a story about being careful what you ask for!

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange, Wright's verse translation of La Fontaine, and Pratt's Aesop for children.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Nil recrastines (English: Put nothing off until tomorrow).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Pax et iustitia (English: Peace and justice - a very fine motto indeed).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Elephantus culicem non curat (English: An elephant has no interest in a gnat - in other words, don't sweat the small stuff).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Sisyphium portas saxum (English: You're carrying the rock of Sisyphus - we've probably all had days like that!).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Zoili sunt (English: They are Zoiluses; from Adagia 2.5.8 - Zoilus was a 4th-century Cynic philosopher who was notorious for being critical of everyone and everything; he was especially famous for his criticisms of Homer, and thus earned the nickname "Homer's scourge," Homeromastix).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Γέρων πίθηκος οὐχ' ἁλίσκεται πάγῃ (English: An old monkey is not caught in a snare... so watch out for us old monkeys, ha ha).

For today's image, here is the Medici Aesop's fishing story: 852. Piscatores et Piscis Insperatus. Piscatores, iactis in mari retibus, diu multumque fatigati, nil ceperant. Et iam taedio, labore, ac desperatione victi, abire decreverant, Fortunam incusantes, cum, insperato, piscis immanis, ab alio actus, in ipsam piscatorum tristium scapham insilit, quem hi, supra modum laetantes, comprehendunt et Fortunae Deae acceptum referunt, quod ars diu tentata negaverat. (source)

Piscatores et Fortuna

Monday, September 27, 2010

Myths and Legends: Penelope and Eurycleia

Penelope and Eurycleia. To find out more about Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This lovely painting of Penelope and the faithful servant Eurycleia is by the 18th-century artist Angelika Kauffman. If you are not familiar with her work, check out the Wikipedia article about her to learn more and see more examples of her paintings. I think they are marvelous!

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 23 - September 29 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Round-Up: September 26

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is ITER - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Iter ad mortem durius quam ipsa mors, "The journey to death is harder than death itself."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots of new illustrated fables and a new slideshow of illustrations from Baby's Book of Fables (1880). This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Arbores et Homo, the sad story of the trees who were their own worst enemies.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange and from Herford's verse Aesop.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Abest timor (English: There is no fear here).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Grave servitutis iugum (English: The yoke of bondage is heavy)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Ex luna scientia (English: From the moon, knowledge). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Negandi causa avaro numquam deficit (English: The miser never fails to find a reason for saying no).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Si leonina pellis non satis est, vulpina addenda (English: If the lion skin is not enough, add the fox skin too; from Adagia 3.5.81 - in other words, if brute strength does not work, try being sly!).

Here's an image from that new slideshow, showing the peacock and Juno: 544. Pavo et Iuno. Pavo graviter conquerebatur apud Iunonem, dominam suam, quod vocis suavitas sibi negata esset dum luscinia, avis tam parum decora, cantu excellat. Cui Iuno “Et merito,” inquit, “non enim omnia bona in unum conferri oportuit.” I like the way that Juno appears here in the form of a statue! (source)

Saturday, September 25, 2010

Myths and Legends: Odysseus and the Sirens

Odysseus and the Sirens. To find out more about the Sirens, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This fifth-century red figure vase painting depicts a famous scene from the Odyssey when Odysseus manages to listen to the son of the bird-women, the Sirens, by making his men fill their ears with wax, while Odysseus has himself tied to the mast so that he can listen to the Siren song without being seduced by its ineluctable summons. (The vase itself is held by the British Museum.)

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 23 - September 29 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.


Friday, September 24, 2010

Round-Up: September 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is UBI - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Ubi dubium, ibi libertas, "Where there is doubt, there is freedom."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots more illustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Accipiter, Milvus, et Columbae, the story of the foolish choice the doves made in electing a leader.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Capra in Rupe Stans et Lupus, the story of a wise goat!

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange and Herford's verse Aesop.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Omnia vincit labor (English: Hard work overcomes all things - which is also the state motto of Oklahoma).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Tempus omnia revelat (English: Time reveals all things).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ebibe vas totum, si vis cognoscoere potum (English: Drain the whole cup, if you want to know the drink).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Medice, cura te ipsum (Luke 4:23). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Clitellae bovi impositae sunt: A packe sadle on a cowe. A proverbe noting a manne as unmeete for an office or dignitie, as a cowe to beare a saddle.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is an epigram by Owen (3.119) with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Mille modis morimur mortales, nascimur uno.
Sunt hominum morbi mille, sed una salus.
Source: "We mortals die in a thousand ways; we are born in one way; people can get a thosuand diseases, but there is only one way of being healthy." As usual, Owen has packed all kinds of lovely parallels and paradoxes into his little epigram.

For an image today, here is a great illustration illustration from a 15th-century edition of the Directorium Humanae Vitae to go with this story: 581. Pisces, Magni et Minuti. Piscator sagenam, quam recens iecerat, extraxit. Obsonii autem erat varii referta. Ast piscium minutus quisque effugit in altum, e rete clam elapsus multiforo, dum captivus quicumque magnus in navicula iacuit extentus. Salus fit quodammodo et malorum effugium parvitas; qui autem magnus est opinione vulgi, eum raro videbis periculum effugere. (source)

Pisces Magni et Minuti

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Myths and Legends: Athena and Poseidon

Athena and Poseidon. To find out more about the contest between Athena and Poseidon, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This painting by the "Amasis Painter" (you can see where it says AMASIS MEPOIESEN, "Amasis Made Me") shows Athena and Poseidon. In a famous incident, the two gods competed for the favor of the people of Athens; the city did not yet have a divine patron. Athena won the contest by giving the people an olive tree and so the city is known as Athens even now.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 23 - September 29 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Myths & Legends: September 23-29


For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Athena and Poseidon. To find out more about the contest between Athena and Poseidon, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Helen of Troy. To find out more about the "face that launched a thousand ships," see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Odysseus and the Sirens. To find out more about the Sirens, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Philemon and Baucis. To find out more about how this couple played host to the gods, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Penelope and Eurycleia. To find out more about Penelope, the wife of Odysseus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Nausicaa. To find out more about the Phaeacian princess Nausicaa, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Athena and Poseidon. To find out more about the contest between Athena and Poseidon, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Round-Up: September 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem decimum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is LITTERA - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Litteris absentes videmus., "By means of letters, we see those who are not here" (one of the most important uses of literacy that I can imagine!).

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots more illustrated fables, including some with illustrations borrowed from Alciato's emblems, such as this one: Olea et Cucurbita. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Aquila et Testudo, the story of a turtle who insisted on learning to fly.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from L'Estrange and Herford's Aesop in verse.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Litteras disce (English: Learn your letters - which goes nicely with the word of the day!).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Virtutis praemium felicitas (English: Happiness is the reward of excellence - not wealth, not fame, but "felicity" - I like that!).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Linque coax ranis, cras corvis, vanaque vanis (English: Leave croaking to the frogs, cawing to the crows, and foolishness to the fools).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Omne regnum contra se divisum desolabitur (English: Every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Eadem tibi et Pythia et Delia (English: It's the same to you whether they are Pythian or Delian games; from Adagia 2.6.80 - this was a response given by an oracle to Polycrates, who was not sure whether to institute games in honor of Apollo Pythius or Apollo Delius; the oracle told him it didn't matter, and this was because Polycrates would die before he instituted the games!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Χελώην Πεγάσῳ συγκρίνεις (English: You're comparing a turtle to Pegasus - which makes a good match for today's easy fable about the turtle that wanted to fly!).

For today's image, look at at the amazing green serpent in this illustration from the Medici Aesop for 614. Serpens Calcata et Apollo. Serpens, cum humi reperet, multorum pedibus calcata erat. Accessit supplex fanum Apollinis; quam simulatque conspexit Deus, “Si primum statim,” inquit, “qui te calcaret, perdidisses, non ausus fuisset alter.” (source)

Serpens Calcatus et Iuppiter

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Myths and Legends: Pandora

Pandora. To find out more about Pandora and her famous box, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

In this painting of Pandora by Lawrence Alma-Tadema, you see the fateful moment before Pandora has opened the jar. I especially like the odd detail of the Sphinx decoration on the top of the jar. Here is a close-up of that decoration:

 

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 16 - September 22 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Monday, September 20, 2010

Round-Up: September 20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is the little preposition DE - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: De te fabula narratur, "The fable speaks about you" - even if it might look like the fable is about talking animals, for example!

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include a slideshow for the Speculum Sapientiae (wow! I never thought I would find an illustrated edition of that text) and lots more illustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Capra in Rupe Stans et Lupus, the story of a sneaky wolf and a very wise goat!

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Galli Inter Se Pugnantes, a great story about how fleeting victory can be!

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange and also from the Herford Aesop in verse.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Sine metu (English: Without fear).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Nulla salus bello (English: There is no safety in war)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Mus satur insipidam diiudicat esse farinam (English: The mouse, when full, considers the flour insipid). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Incertus animus dimidium est sapientiae (English: A mind that doubts is halfway to wisdom).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Multi qui boves stimulent, pauci aratores (English: Many are those who drive the oxen, but few are the real ploughmen; from Adagia 1.7.9).

For an image today, here is Grandville's wonderful illustration for the story of the two roosters fighting: 563. Galli Inter Se Pugnantes. Galli duo, ut eorum mos est, inter se de ducatu gallinarum acerrime certabant. Qui superior in pugna fuerat, alarum plausu vocisque cantu se victorem fuisse significans, Venere et otio emarcuit. Victus autem, a conspectu gallinarum profugiens, cum cornicibus et pavonibus sese quotidie pugnando exercebat; inferendi vitandique ictus artem ediscebat. Qui, ubi se satis instructum vidit, rediens, adversarium ad pugnam provocatum nullo negotio superavit.

Galli Pugnantes

Saturday, September 18, 2010

Myths and Legends: Odysseus in the Court of Alcinous

Odysseus in the Court of Alcinous. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey home, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This wonderful illustration for Homer's Odyssey shows Odysseus in the court of Alcinous, King of the Phaeacians. Odysseus has not revealed his identity to the Phaeacians, but when the bard begins to sing a song of Odysseus's own adventures at Troy, he cannot help but begin to weep, covering his face as you can see below.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 16 - September 22 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Friday, September 17, 2010

Round-Up: September 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is REDDO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Reddit fetorem stercus motum graviorem, "Stirred shit stinks worse" (and the Latin rhymes!).

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots more llustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Mustela et Homo, the story of the weasel pleading for her life.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Mures, Feles, et Tintinnabulum, the famous story of belling the cat.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are by Sir Roger L'Estrange, along with some rhyming verse fables by Oliver Herford.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Non deest spes (English: There is no lack of hope).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Caritas omnia potest (English: Love can do all things).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Plus probo thesaurum docti, quam divitis aurum (English: I more esteem the treasure of the learned man than the rich man's gold).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Nunc hunc, nunc illum consumit gladius (II Samuel 11:25). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Dii facientes adiuvant: The Goddess do helpe the doers. Hereby is mente, that the heavenly power is an ayde and helpe, not to loyterers and idle persons, but to laborious and paineful folke, and such as put to their own good willes.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is one of the elegant little epigrams by Owen (3.131), with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Omnia fert aetas secum, aufert omnia secum.
Omnia tempus habent, omnia tempus habet.
English: "Time brings all things with it, and it bears away all things; all things have their time and time has all things." What a perfect little epigram!

Today's image is for the story of the dove fooled by a painting, 512. Columba et Hydria Picta. Columba, siti compulsa, aquam ut inveniret, huc illuc ambulaverat. Conspecta deinde picta in pariete hydria, vas aqua plenum se invenisse credens, celeri impetu petiit potum. Sed semianimis illisa parieti concidit humi. Morti ergo vicina, sic secum locuta est, “Infelix ego et misera, quae, aquae nimis appetens, non cogitaram vitae periculum.” (source) - as usual, the Medici Aesop shows the three parts of the story in a single panel: the dove is flying, the dove hits the wall... and then there she is lying on the ground where the man discovers her.

Columba et Hydria Picta

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Myths & Legends: September 16-22

Sept. 9-15 - Sept. 16-22 - Sept. 23-29

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

The Return of Odysseus. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey home, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Heracles and the Hydra. To find out more about the labors of Heracles, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Odysseus in the Court of Alcinous. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey home, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Helen on the Walls of Troy. To find out more about Helen and the Trojan War, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Jason and Medea. To find out more about Medea, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Pandora. To find out more about Pandora and her famous box, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Maenad. To find out more about the frenzied followers of the god Dionysus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Myths and Legends: The Return of Odysseus

The Return of Odysseus. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey home, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This beautiful fresco by Pinturicchio (housed now in the National Gallery in London), dated to 1509, shows Penelope weaving, besieged by suitors, as she awaits the return of her husband Odysseus. The painting is full of lovely details, like the "painting within a painting" in the background where you can see two of the adventures of Odysseus depicted there (on the left you can see the island of the sorceress Circe who turned Odysseus' men into pigs, and on the right you can see Odysseus listening to the song of the Sirens while strapped to the mast of his ship).


Meanwhile, you can see Odysseus just now entering the house, disguised as an old man, and I wonder if the lovely boy behind the door frame is meant to be Telemachus...? I guess so, as he is not dressed so gaudily as those suitors in the foreground!


Meanwhile, behind Penelope you can see Odysseus' bow, which Penelope has posed as a wedding test - and which will prove to be the suitors' doom when Odysseus reveals his identity! So while the painting is hardly Greek in appearance, it is full of details from the ancient Greek story. Lovely! I like the suitors all dressed up in their fancy clothes!

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 16 - September 22 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Myths and Legends: Orpheus and Eurydice

Orpheus and Eurydice. To find out more about Orpheus and Eurydice, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This shows the final scene of the sad story of Orpheus and Eurydice: after having successfully petitioned for his wife's return to the land of the living, Orpheus is leading her back home, but is not allowed to look back. We see him here just before he looks back and loses his Eurydice forever.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 9 - September 15 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: September 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Octobres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is INTER - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Tantalus inter undas sitit, "Tantalus thirsts amidst the waves."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots of new illustrated fables - there are about 400 of the illustrated fables now! This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Simius Rex et Vulpes, about how the monkey was made king of the animals... and then was outsmarted by the fox.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Graculus et Pavones.

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are from Sir Roger L'Estrange: An Ass and the Frogs, A Stag and a Lyon, A Wolf and a Crane, A Wolf and a Sheep, and A Horse and a Lion.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Iracundiam rege (English: Rule your anger).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Volens et valens (English: Willing and able - although the Latin sounds much better!).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Bos ad aquam tractus non vult potare coactus (English: An ox led to water will not drink under compulsion).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Caritas perfecta foras mittit timorem (English: Perfect love drives fear out).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Mandrabuli more res succedit (English: The thing is going the way of Mandrabulus; from Adagia 1.2.58 - This refers to things that get steadily worse; a certain Mandrabulus once found a treasure and made an offering of a golden sheep to Juno the first year, a silver offering the next year, and bronze offering the year after that).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Χαλεπὸν τὸ εὖ γνῶναι (English: To know is hard.).

Today's image is one of the illustrations from the beautiful Medici Aesop, for the story of the crow and the donkey: 435. Corvus Asinum Feriens. Asinus, cuius in dorso ulcus inerat, in prato quodam pascebatur. Corvus autem cum supra ipsum constitisset ac rostro ulcus feriret, asinus prae cruciatu vehementer rudebat atque saltabat. Procul interim stante agasone deque illo ridente, lupus, forte praeteriens, ubi fieri id vidit, “Heu nos miseros,” secum ait, “nos enim homines si tantum viderint, statim persequuntur; hos vero etiam accedentes cum risu libenter excipiunt.” (source)

Corvus, Asinus et Lupus

Monday, September 13, 2010

Myths and Legends: Orpheus and the Animals

Orpheus and the Animals. To find out more about Orpheus, the legendary poet and musician, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Orpheus was the great singer and musician of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds; his playing was able to captivate not only humans, but also animals, as you can see in this Roman mosaic; you can compare another mosaic on this same theme here.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 9 - September 15 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: September 13

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm Twittering again now at Aesopus and AesopusEnglish.

HODIE: Idus Septembres, the "Ides of September" (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is that tiny little verb AIO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Aut ai aut nega, "Say either 'yea' or 'nay'"

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots more illustrated fables (I'm trying to do five every day). This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Ovis, Cervus, et Lupus, the story of the sneaky stag and the wise sheep.

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Mures Felem Contemplantes , a fable warning the mice to watch out!

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables are by Sir Roger L'Estrange: Countryman and Snake, Wolf and Kid, Wild Ass and Tame, Raven and Swan, and The Crow and the Muscle (we would say "mussel").

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Vigilando ascendimus (English: By being watchful, we rise).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Omnia somnia mendacia (English: All dreams are deceptive)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Improbe Neptunum accusat, qui iterum naufragium facit (English: The man who shipwrecks a second time unjustly accuses Neptune). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Animo imperato, ne tibi animus imperet (English: Keep your feelings under control, so that your feelings do not control you).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Hydrus in dolio (English: There's a snake in the jar; from Adagia 3.10.98 - The story goes that a man was puzzled by the way the wine level in a sealed jar kept going down, if no one was draining the wine from the outside. At the bottom of the jar there was a water-snake, and it had been drinking the wine!).

Today's image accompanies the podcast for the story of the mice who watched the cat (source) - you can see that the story does not end well for the well-wishing mouse!

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Myths and Legends: Cleopatra

Cleopatra. To find out more about Cleopatra, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This exotic depiction of Cleopatra is by Gustave Moreau, one of my favorite painters. You can read more about Moreau in this Wikipedia article.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of September 9 - September 15 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: September 11

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium Idus Septembres (and yes, you can have your own Roman Google Calendar).

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is AMBULO - read a brief essay about the word at the Verbosum blog. Here's one of the sayings you can find in the essay: Paulatim deambulando, longum conficitur iter., "Walking along a step at a time, you can finish a long journey."

MILLE FABULAE: New materials at the blog include lots of new illustrated fables. This is also where you can download your free PDF copy of the Mille Fabulae et Una book.

FABULAE FACILES: The new easy-to-read fable is Mures, Feles, et Tintinnabulum, the famous story of belling the cat!

PODCASTS: Today's Latin audio fable is Galerita Laqueo Capta .

ENGLISH AESOP: Today's English fables by L'Estrange are: An Ass, a Lyon and a Cock; A Goat and a Vine; A Lyon in Love; A Fox and Grapes; and A Cock and a Diamond.

TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: Widgets available at SchoolhouseWidgets.com.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Miseris succurrere disco (English: I learn how to give aid to those in need).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Omnes fragiles sumus (English: We are all easily broken).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Nulla valet tantum virtus, patientia quantum (English: No other virtue is as strong as patience - a very nice use of tantum-quantum).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Nolite iudicare, et non iudicabimini. (Luke 6:37). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Tussis pro crepitu: The Latin Proverbe rose of them, which with a lowde coughe or hem, hide and dissemble their fartinges, which kinde of people even this day not without great laughter be found out. And it maybe applied uppon him, whiche covereth his faulte or frailtie with some other thing. As if a man being taken in the house of a fayre Woman, which had not good name, sayeth that he came thether, to have a shyrte made of her, or for other affaires.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from the rhyming sayings collected by Wegeler, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Tempus adhuc veniet, quo dives, qui modo gaudet,
Assidue flebit, dum pauper grata videbit.
English: "The time is coming when the rich man, who was just now rejoicing, will weep bitterly, while the poor man will see things that please him."

For an image today, here is the story of the vicious dog (source): 387. Canis Mordax. Cani, saepius homines mordenti, illigavit dominus nolam, scilicet ut sibi quisque caveret. Canis, ratus virtuti suae tributum hoc decus esse, populares omnes despicit. Accedit tandem ad hunc canem aliquis, iam aetate et auctoritate gravis, monens eum ne erret. “Nam ista nola,” inquit, “data est tibi in dedecus, non in decus.”

Canis Mordax  - Osius

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Myths & Legends: September 9-15

Sept. 2-8 - Sept. 9-15 - Sept. 16-22

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Thetis Consoling Achilles. To find out more about Thetis, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Helen and Menelaus. To find out more about Helen and her husband Menelaus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Cleopatra. To find out more about Cleopatra, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Pandora. To find out more about Pandora and her famous box, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Orpheus and the Animals. To find out more about Orpheus, the legendary poet and musician, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Cephalus and Procris. To find out more about Procris and her husband Cephalus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Orpheus and Eurydice. To find out more about Orpheus and Eurydice, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.