Monday, May 31, 2010

Round-Up: May 31

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. I'm posting at Twitter again now, too! :-)

HODIE: pridie Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

VERBUM HODIERNUM: Today's word is EQUUS - read a brief essay about the word at my new Verbosum blog. Plus, I did today's vocabulary challenge, with these words: primus - sanctus - arripio - aetas - ex. Try to put those words into a sentence yourself... and then see what I came up with.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
  • Agricola et Asini, the story of a man who met his death in a wagon pulled by donkeys.
  • Galerita, a wonderful aetiological story about how the crested lark got its crest (a story sometimes told also about the crested hoopoe).
  • Agricola et Aquila, an eagle shows its gratitude to a good-hearted man.
  • Hercules et Minerva, Athena teaches Heracles a lesson in self-control.
  • Leo, Lupus et Umbra Eius, a story about a wolf with an inflated sense of self.
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the wolf and his shadow, Leo, Lupus et Umbra Eius, to share with you here in the blog:
Lupus in dēserta loca pererrāns, dum iam sōl in occāsum vergeret, cum suī umbram valdē longam animadvertisset, Leōnem, inquit, egō timeō, cum tantus sim, ut iūgerum aequem? Nonne prorsus in cēterās ferās omnēs imperium exercēbō? Dum haec Lupus superbē sēcum cōgitat, Leo supervēnit, eumque dictō citius dēvorāvit. Quapropter Lupus paenitentiā, sed frustrā tactus, exclāmābat: Ō stulta opīnio, quae meae necis causa es!
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Mirandum naturae opus (English: We should marvel at the works of nature).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Separa et impera (English: Divide and conquer).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Quae pro parte nocent, plurima saepe docent. (English: Things which do their share of harm often teach many things - a saying about the school of "hard knocks" as we say!).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Veritas liberabit vos (John 8:32). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Canis vindictam: A dogge hath a day. There is none so vile nor simple a person, but at one time or other may avenge him self of wronges done unto him. Wherfore it is a wise mans part to contemne no man.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is one of those paradoxical delights by Owen (4.112), with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Nascitur in certam miserandus homuncio mortem,
Ut macer in campo || bos, ut edatur, edit.
English: "The pitiable little manikin is born for certain death, like a scrawny cow in the field who eats in order to be eaten." Unfortunately, there's nothing in English nearly as good as that Latin homuncio!

Today's image is an illustration showing Hercules together with Athena - not exactly an illustration for the fable Hercules et Minerva, but I thought it was a wonderful image!

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Myths and Legends: Clytie

Clytie. To find out more about Clytie and her love for Apollo, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Poor Clytie was a nymph who was madly in love with Apollo (or, in some versions, the sun god Helios), but he abandoned her. She pined away with longing for the god and was eventually turned into a heliotrope, a flower whose face is always turning towards the sun.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 27 - June 2 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Friday, May 28, 2010

Myths and Legends: Hector and Paris

Hector and Paris. To find out more about Hector and his brother Paris, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Hector and Paris were both princes of Troy, sons of King Priam. It was when Paris abducted Helen, the wife of King Menelaus of Sparta, that the Trojan War was set in motion; Troy was attacked by Greek armies led by Agamemnon, brother of Menelaus, seeking Helen's return. In this painting, you can see Hector, the great hero of the Trojan people, rebuking his brother Paris for having abducted Helen and for being unwilling to fight in the war that he himself had caused. The clothing worn by Paris and by Hector heightens the utter contrast between the two of them.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 27 - June 2 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: May 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

VOCABULARY: Today's word is hic (as in hic-haec-hoc - read a brief essay about the word at my new Verbosum blog (and find out where that final "c" comes from). Plus, I did today's vocabulary challenge, with these words: mereo - fides - vel - remaneo - unus. Try to put those words into a sentence yourself... and then see what I came up with, and leave a comment with your creation!

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of Athena and the shipwrecked man, Naufragus et Minerva to share with you here in the blog - this is one of my favorite Aesop's fables of all time, in fact, so I was very glad to find a Latin version!
Dīves quīdam Atheniēnsis ōlim cum aliīs nonnullīs nāvigābat. Tempestāte autem ingentī exortā, submersāque navī, reliquī omnēs sē natātū servārunt; sed Atheniēnsis subinde Minervam invocāns, sescenta eī prōmittēbat, sī ex undīs ēriperētur, cum adnatāns ex naufragīs ūnus, Cum Minervā, inquit, tū quoque manūs movē.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Conanti dabitur (English: To the one who strives, it will be given - something you can say with just two words in Latin).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Libri muti magistri (English: Books are silent teachers)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nemo ex amoris vulnere sanus abit (English: No one walks away unscathed from the wound of love). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Velox consilium sequitur paenitentia (English: A hasty plan results in regret).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Habet et musca splenem (English: Even the fly has its spleen - small as it may be; from Adagia 3.5.7).

For an image today, here is a beautiful sculpture of Athena, as found now in the Acropolis Museum - it's an illustration for the story of the shipwrecked man, Naufragus et Minerva:

Thursday, May 27, 2010

Myths & Legends: May 27 - June 2

May 20-26 - May 27 - June 2 - June 3-9

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Selene and Endymion. To find out more about the Moon's lover, Endymion, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Hector and Paris. To find out more about Hector and his brother Paris, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


The Death of Procris. To find out more about the tragic story of Procris and Cephalus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Clytie. To find out more about Clytie and her love for Apollo, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


The Apples of the Hesperides. To find out more about the Hesperides, the nymphs of the far west,, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Venus Tries to Detain Adonis. To find out more about Adonis, the lover of Venus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


The Sacrifice of Iphigenia. To find out more about Iphigenia, the daughter of Agamemnon, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Round-Up: May 27

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Also, as you will see below, I'm starting a new project this summer - a review of Basic Latin Vocabulary - with a daily vocabulary challenge, too!

HODIE: ante diem sextum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

VOCABULARY: Today's word is mereo - read a brief essay about the word at my new Verbosum blog. Plus, I did today's vocabulary challenge, with these words: ante - via - o - sine - praedico. Try to put those words into a sentence yourself... and then see what I came up with.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the ambitious bird, Monedula et Corvi, to share with you here in the blog:
Monēdula quaedam corporis magnitūdine cēterīs praestantior, suārum cōnsortium dēspiciēns, ad Corvōs sēcessit, rogāvitque, ut eōrum societāte fruī permitterent. Illī formam et vōcem corvī eī dēesse noscentēs, inter verbera ēiēcēre. Ita ab illīs expulsa, ad monēdulās revertitur; sed illae ob iniūriam illatam īrātae nōn suscēpēre, ac ita factum est, ut utrōrumque cōnsortiō prīvārētur.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Nolo servile capistrum (English: I refuse to wear the slave's halter).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Arcus tensus rumpitur (English: The tensed bow snaps... sooooo, RELAX).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Qui bibit et rebibit, nec cessat, stultus abibit (English: He who drinks and drinks again and does not stop will depart a fool).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Qui servat ficum, comedet fructus eius (Proverbs 27:18). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sero sapiunt Phryges: The Troyans are wise to late. When the saege of Troy had endured for the space of ten yeares, then at last the Troyans which now had suffred innumerable mischiefes, began to take counsaile, whether it were best to send home againe faire Helene, the occasion of al their miserie. But when theyr countrey was now with continual warres wasted and destroyed, it was to late to be wise. Even so it is of manie at this day, They be wise, but to late.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from Horace (a bit of Carm. 4.7), with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Inmortalia ne speres, monet annus et almum
quae rapit hora diem.
English: "Don't hope for things immortal; the year warns you not to, as does the hour that steals away the enlivening day."

For an image today, here is an illustration for the story of the wolf and the horse, Lupus et Equus:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Myths and Legends: The Flight of Aeneas

The Flight of Aeneas. To find out more about Aeneas and his flight from Troy, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Today's image is a dramatic scene from the downfall of Troy. The Trojan hero Aeneas has come back to his home in order to rescue his family and flee the city which has been overrun by their Greek enemies. Aeneas is carrying his aged father Anchises on his back with his young son Ascanius stumbling along beside him. His wife, Creusa, runs along just behind him - but Creusa will not survive their flight; he will lose her in the chaos and confusion and then be visited by her ghost. You can read all about that in Vergil's Aeneid, Book 2.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 20-26 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: May 26

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem septimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the contest of Zeus and Apollo, Iuppiter et Apollo, to share with you here in the blog - don't mess with the big guy!
Iuppiter et Apollo dē iaculandī arte contendēbant. Phoebus itaque cum arcum intendisset, sagittamque ēmīsisset, Iuppiter tantum spatiī unō gressō confēcit, quantum Apollinis ēmissa sagitta.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Hydram secas (English: You're slashing at the hydra - the problem, of course, is that the hydra grows back!).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Pro mundi beneficio (English: For the good of the world).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Aquila non generat columbam (English: An eagle does not give birth to a dove).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Requiesce, comede, bibe, epulare (English: Rest, eat, drink, party on - which is adapted from Luke 12:19).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Stentore clamosior (English: Louder than Stentor - which would be very "stentorian" indeed; from Adagia 2.3.37).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄκρον λάβε, καὶ μέσον ἕξεις (English: Grab for the top, and you'll have the middle - and who knows, you might even manage to have the top, at least sometimes!).

For an image today, here is an illustration to go with the story of the doctor and his patient, Medicus Imperitus - it's a statue of Lord Hades himself:

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Round-Up: May 25

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem octavum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the wasp and the snake, Vespa et Serpens, to share with you here in the blog - although the snake claims to be happy with the outcome, it seems to me that the cure is worse than the disease here! :-)
Vespa in Serpentis capite ōlim īnsidēns, continuīsque acūleī suī ictibus feriēns, ātrōciter ipsum vexābat. Serpēns itaque magnīs dolōribus excruciātus, cum eam nec ulciscī, nec ā sē removēre ullō modō posset, forte plaustrum multīs lignīs onustum cum vīdisset, suum caput ultrō rotae supposuit, Moriāmur, aiēns, sed cum hoste moriāmur: atque ita ūnā cum Vespā extinctus est.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Lampada tradam (English: I will pass on the torch; the accusative form lampada is a later Latin form).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Tempus vitae magister (English: Time is life's teacher)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Repetitio mater memoriae (English: Repetition is the mother of memory.). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Avarus ipse miseriae causa est suae (English: The miser is himself the cause of his own misery - just think of Dickens' Scrooge, for example!).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Irritas crabrones (English: You're stirring up the hornets - which is, of course, a very foolish thing to do; from Adagia 1.1.60).

For an image today, here is an illustration for the story of the donkey and his driver, Asinus et Agaso:

Monday, May 24, 2010

Myths and Legends: Andromache and Hector

Andromache and Hector. To find out more about Hector and Andromache, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Hector was a prince of Troy and the greatest warrior of the Trojan army; he was finally killed by the Greek warrior Achilles. This image shows Hector and his wife Andromache. Andromache survived the war, taken as a captive by Achilles' son, Neoptolemus.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 20-26 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: May 24

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem nonum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the discerning donkey, Lupus, Lex eius et Asinus, to share with you here in the blog:
Lupus quīdam, quī Lupīs cēterīs imperābat, lēgem ōlim tulit, ut praedam, quam ūnusquisque caperet, in medium conferret, et cēterīs impertīrētur. Asinus, hīs audītīs, iubam quatiēns, atque subrīdēns, ēgregie quidem, ait, Ō Lupōrum imperātor, pronuntiāstī; sed praedam, quam tū heri cēpistī, quīnam tuō in cubīlī, ut eā sōlus vescī possēs, clanculum reposuistī? Agedum, adfer huc illam, ut cēterīs dīvidātur. Ad haec Lupus stupōre perculsus, lēgem prōtinus abrogāvit.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Alis aspicio astra (English: Rising on my wings, I gaze at the stars - which sounds very nice in Latin, with the alliteration).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Messis sementem sequitur (English: The harvest follows the sowing).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Nunquam dives erit, multum qui ludere quaerit (English: The man who avidly seeks amusements will never be rich).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Nos debemus alterutrum diligere (I John 4:11). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Sub ipsius iudicio sorex perit: The Rat dieth by utteryng of her self. This Proverbe toke the beginning of the propertie of this vermin for the Rattes be wonte to make a noyse muche more than mice do, and do more rumble about and make a noysom crieng while they gnaw candels endes or such other trifels to whiche noyse many men harkeninge forthwith though it be in the darke night throw at them and to kill them. Semblably many men and women there be which by theyr owne noyse, and be wraying of them selves, seke their owne bande and destruction.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is one of those epigrams from Owen (4.115), with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Quod reges audire timent, ac dicere servi,
Ipsa tibi dicit fama, memento mori.
English: "That which kings fear to hear, and servants fear to say, rumor itself tells you: memento mori." I decided to just leave that memento mori in Latin - and check out this Wikipedia article about the artistic tradition that goes by this name.

For an image today, here is an ancient Greek depiction of a shoemaker, an illustration for the story of Hermes and the shoemakers, Mercurius et Artifices:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Myths and Legends: Death of Hyacinth

The Death of Hyacinth. To find out more about Hyacinth, the lover of Apollo, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

Hyacinth is a hero in Greek mythology who had a cultic shrine at Amyclae in ancient times; in some legends, he is said to be the son of King Amyclas, the ancestor of the Spartan people. Unfortunately, Hyacinth was loved both by the god Apollo and by the god of the West Wind, Zephyr. One day when playing a discus game with Apollo, Zephyr caused the discus to hit Hyacinth in the head, killing him. In this painting by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, there is a tennis racket lying beside Hyacinth; you can read more about the "tennis" version of the myth at the Real Tennis website.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 20-26 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Friday, May 21, 2010

Round-Up: May 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
  • Pater et Filiae, a father is baffled by the opposite wishes of his daughters.
  • Formica et Scarabaeus, the ant refuses to help the starving dung beetle when winter comes.
  • Heros, a divine hero warns a man to stop making extravagant sacrifices.
  • Demades, the orator is outrage that his audience prefers Aesop's fables to his speech.
  • Homicida , a criminal is gobbled up by a Nile crocodile.
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the dung beetle, Formica et Scarabaeus, to share with you here in the blog since it provides such a great twist on the familiar story of the ant and the cricket:
Formīca aestīvō tempore arva circumiēns, frūmentum ac hordeum colligēbat, sibique, ut vescī posset hieme, recondēbat. Hanc vidēns Scarabaeus, ingentem quidem eius labōrem atque sollicitūdinem est admīrātus, quod nīmīrum eō tempore, quō animālia cētera, labōre remissō, ōtia trahunt, ipsa contrā ita labōrī īnsūdāret. Ad haec Formīca tunc nihil rēspondit. Posteā vērō cum hiems advēnisset, atque fimus, nimiō imbre perfūsus, omnīno madefactus esset, Scarabaeus famē correptus ad eam sē contulit, ac, ut aliquid cibī daret, ēnixē rogāvit. Cui illa, sī tum, Sarabaee, escam tibi comparāssēs, cum mē labōrantem increpābās, nunc profectō nōn indigērēs.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Semper vigilans (English: Always watchful - and that present active participle form words for men and women, no need to adjust the motto for your gender).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Vitae sal amicitia (English: Friendship is the salt of life)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Stercus optimum vestigium domini (English: The master's footstep is the best fertilizer). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Avarus damno potius quam sapiens dolet (English: The miser grieves over a loss more than the wise man does).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Tineas pasces (English: You're going to feed the moths; from Adagia 2.8.96 - a saying Erasmus finds in Horace).

For an image today, here is an illustration for the story of the man making too many sacrifices, Heros - it's a 5th-century BCE Greek vase painting by the so-called Pothos Painter:

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Myths & Legends: May 20-26

May 13-19 - May 20-26 - May 27 - June 2

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Polyxena and Troilus. To find out more about the princess of Troy, Polyxena, and her brother Troilus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Amazon in Battle. To find out more about the women warriors called Amazons, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Death of Hyacinth. To find out more about Hyacinth, the lover of Apollo, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


The Trojan Horse. To find out more about the wooden horse built by the Greeks, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Andromache and Hector. To find out more about Hector and Andromache, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Phaethon. To find out more about Phaethon, the son of the sun-god Helios, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


The Flight of Aeneas. To find out more about Aeneas and his flight from Troy, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Myths and Legends: Polyxena and Troilus

Polyxena and Troilus. To find out more about the princess of Troy, Polyxena, and her brother Troilus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

King Priam of Troy and Queen Hecuba had many children; Troilus was their youngest son, and Polyxena was their youngest daughter. A prophecy stated that if Troilus reached the age of twenty, then the Greeks would not be able to defeat Troy in the war. Achilles, however, was able to ambush young Troilus and kill him. Still later, Achilles fell in love with Polyxena, a key factor in Achilles' own death - you can read about Achilles and Polyxena here and about the sacrifice of Polyxena here.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 20-26 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: May 20

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
  • Momus, the carping god Momus critiques the inventions of Zeus, Athena and Poseidon.
  • Bubulcus et Taurus Amissus, the cowherd is terrified when he finds the lion he claimed to be seeking.
  • Canis et Lepus, the rabbit is not sure about the intentions of the dog who is chasing him.
  • Atheniensis et Thebanus, the Athenian and the Theban debate the merits of their respective gods, Theseus and Hercules.
  • Equus et Homo, the horse rebukes the man who sells his barley.
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the Boeotian's riposte to the Athenian, Atheniensis et Thebanus, to share with you here in the blog - again, it's a bit on the long side, but well worth reading!
Cīvis Athēniēnsis cum Thēbānō cīve viam carpēbat commūniter et, ut fit, confābulābātur; sermoque cum flueret, ad hērōās usque dēlapsus est: prōlixum quidem cēterō argūmentum, nec necessārium. Tandem Thēbānus nātum Alcmēnae hominum maximum et nunc deōrum quoque esse praedicābat. Quī autem Athēnīs oriundus multō praestantiōrem Thēseum fuisse repōnēbat, cum sortem vēre dīvīnam esset sortītus, servīlem Hercules. Et ita locūtus vincēbat; disertus enim fuit rhētor. Alter vērō, nōn aequā, quippe Boeōtus, ōrātōriae concertātiōnis arte pollēns, rūdā Mūsā dixit: Dēsine. Vincis. Igitur nōbīs Thēseus īrāscātur, Athēniēnsibus Hercules."
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Sape et tace (English: Be wise and be silent).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Exercitatio potest omnia (English: Practice accomplishes everything).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Mos est stultorum reprehendere facta bonorum (English: It is the custom of fools to criticize good people's deeds - see, in this regard, the fable of Momus cited above!).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Ego dico vobis: non resistere malo ((Matt. 5:39). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Crocodili lacrimae: Crocodiles teares. A proverbe applied unto them which hating an other man, whom they woulde destroye or have destroyed, they will seme to be sorye for hem. It ys taken of the propertie of Crocodilus the monstre, who beholding a man comming whom he would devoure weepeth, and after he hath eaten the bodye, he washeth the head with his teares and then eateth it also.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is one of those elegant epigrams by Owen (4.190), with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Virtutem genii duo semper in orbe sequuntur,
Hic bonus, ille malus, || gloria et invidia.
English: "There are two guardian spirits that always follow excellence in this world, one good, and the other bad - they are renown and envy." So true: anyone who achieves fame in this world must bear the burden of jealouy, too.

Today's image is an illustration for the fable of the cowherd in pursuit of a lion, Bubulcus et Taurus Amissus - look closely and you'll see the cowherd terrified by his own success in tracking down the predator:


Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Round-Up: May 19

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the gods' justice, Homo, Mercurius et Formicae, to share with you here in the blog - it's a longer one, but well worth reading, something to think about every time you squash a mosquito, for example, this summer!
Nāve quondam ipsīs dēmersā cum vectōribus, spectātor quīdam deōs arguēbat aequōs nōn esse iūdicēs: ūnō sī quidem impiō ratem ingressō, innocentēs plūrimōs ūna cum illō interīrent. Quae dum loquerētur, simul, ut fert cāsus, multārum ad ipsum accessit agmen formīcārum, paleolās properantium rōdere trīticeās. Dē quibus ūna cum momordisset illum, plūrimās pede prōculcāvit. Tum adstāns Mercurius, et hominem virgula feriēns, Deinceps nōn patiēris, inquit, deōs esse vestrum iūdicēs, quālem tē praebēs formīcārum?
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Proverbs: Today's tiny proverb is: Aleam fuge (English: Keep away from the dice - in other words: don't gamble).

3-Word Mottoes Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Labore et scientia (English: With hard work and knowledge).

Latin Animal Proverb: Today's animal proverb is Ulula cum lupis, cum quibus esse cupis (English: Howl with the wolves if you want to be one of them).

Proverbs of Polydorus: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Si quis non vult operari, non manducet (English: If someone does not want to work, let him not eat).

Proper Name Proverb from Erasmus: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Fuimus Troes (English: We were the Trojans... until, that is, Troy was no more; from Adagia 1.9.50).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἤως ὁρῶσα τὰ νυκτὸς ἔργα γελᾷ (English: Aurora videns noctis opera ridet - which is to say, the results of an all-nighter are bound to be disappointing!).

For an image today, here is an illustration for the story of the cat and the hen, Gallina et Feles:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Myths and Legends: Perseus Rescues Andromeda

Perseus Rescues Andromeda. To find out more about Perseus and Andromeda, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.

This painting by Carle van Loo features an especially nasty-looking sea monster! You can see Perseus arriving on his winged sandals, ready to do battle with that monster in order to free the princess Andromeda who has been left as a sacrificial offering. Perseus manages to slay the monster and then takes Andromeda as his bride.

You can also find more myths and legends for the week of May 13-19 here. For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Widget Reference Page.

Round-Up: May 18

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
  • Vulpes et Simia, the fox and the monkey debate their ancestry.
  • Leo et Aquila, the story of a would-be friendship between the king of the beasts and the king of the birds.
  • Eques et Equus, the story of the war-horse's shifting fortunes in war and peace.
  • Lepus et Vulpes, the story of a rabbit trapped in a well.
  • Homo et Vulpes, a story about the original "fire-fox"!
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the boastful monkey, Vulpes et Simia, to share with you here in the blog:
Vulpes et sīmia eundem in locum faciēbant iter. Cum per sepulcra eās via dūceret, sīmia ad vulpem, "Omnēs (inquit) quōs hīc sepultōs vidēs, parentum meōrum lībertī erant." "Callidē," rēspondet vulpes, "mentīta es. Nec enim hōrum quisquam, quī humātī sunt, tē potest convincere."
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Dei donum (English: A gift of God - the alliteration works in both the Latin and the English).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Tempus magistrorum optimus (English: Time is the best of teachers)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is In caput auctoris facinus plerumque redundat (English: A crime often comes back to hit the doer in the head). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Blanditia, non imperio fit dulcis Venus. Flattering words, not commands, make Venus sweet (English: Flattering words, not commands, make Venus sweet - with the Goddess of Love standing in for love itself).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Equo senescenti minora admove (English: Load less on the old horse; from Adagia 2.8.52).

In honor of Publilius Syrus's proverb about Venus, here is a medallion of Aphrodite and Eros from Syria, circa the third century B.C.E.:

Monday, May 17, 2010

Round-Up: May 17

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas Iunias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the ox's rebuke of the donkey, Bos et Asinus, to share with you here in the blog:
Bovī, quem possidēbat ūnicum, adiunctā asinā, homo quīdam arābat ; paupercule quidem, sed fuit necessitas. Cum autem, opere perfectō, bestiās homo esset iugō solūtūrus, et ita iterrogāret bovem asina, Quis senī revehet īnstrūmenta? Ille ipse quī solet, bōs rēspondit asinae.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Non eget integer (English: The man with integrity has no wants).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Sol omnia aperit (English: The sun reveals all things).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Nunc est dicendum, nunc cum ratione silendum (English: Sometimes you need to speak, and sometimes you need to wisely keep silent).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Vidi sub sole nec sapientium panem nec doctorum divitias (Ecc. 9:11). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Malum bene conditum ne movetis: Move not an evil that is wel layed. An incommoditie well couched, is not to be sturred.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from Cato's Distichs, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Quid deus intendat, noli perquirere sorte:
Quid statuat de te, sine te deliberat ille.
English: "Do not seek by divination to find out what God has in mind; he weighs what to do with you without you." I've tried to capture the lovely word play of de te || sine te in the English, too!

For an image today, I thought I would share one of the slides from my latest proverb slideshow with Proverbs about Labor in Latin - click here to see the whole slideshow.





Friday, May 14, 2010

Round-Up: May 14

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE: pridie Idus Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the weasel who turned into a woman, Mustela et Venus, to share with you here in the blog - it's a Latin version of a poem by Babrius so the language is a bit elaborate, but the story is a great one!
Ōlim mustēlae, pulchrum quae amābat virum, Cȳpris augusta dedit, Cupīdinum māter, formam mūtāre et fēmineam assūmere, fēminaeque venustae, quam quī nōn habēbat ardēbat. Cōnspectam vir ille (nam captus est quī cēperat) uxōrem dūcere dēstinābat. Mēnsā autem positā, mūs praetercurrit, quem altē strātō dēscendēns lectō spōnsa persecūta fuit; sīcque solūtum est nuptiāle convīvium. Ac bellē cum rīsisset, Amor abiit. Nātūrā enim mulier victa fuit.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Tiny Mottoes: Today's tiny motto is: Fortuna favente (English: With Fortune's favor).

3-Word Proverbs Verb-less: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Aurora Musis amica (English: Dawn is a friend to the Muses - let the rising sun inspire your creative powers!)

Audio Latin Proverb: Today's audio Latin proverb is Nocumentum documentum (English: A loss, a lesson). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Maxims of Publilius Syrus: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Eripere telum, non dare irato decet (English: You should deprive an angry man of weapons, not donate them).

Animal Proverb from Erasmus: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Camelus vel scabiosa complurium asinorum gestat onera (English: Even a mangy camel can bear the loads of many donkeys; from Adagia 1.9.58).

I've done another proverb slideshow - Familia in Proverbiis - and here's a picture of one of the slides; I like this one!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

Thursday, May 13, 2010

Myths & Legends: May 13-19

May 6-12 - May 13-19 - May 20-26

For more information and links to the actual javascript code, see the Myths & Legends Reference Page.

Odysseus and Eurycleia. To find out more about Odysseus and his journey home, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There is also a post here.


Calypso Receiving Mentor and Telemachus. To find out more about the nymph Calypso, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Electra and Orestes. To find out more about Orestes and his sister Electra, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Prometheus Bound. To find out more about the Titan Prometheus, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There is also a post here.


Helen and Paris. To find out more about Helen and Paris, the prince of Troy, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Perseus Rescues Andromeda. To find out more about Perseus and Andromeda, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source. There's also a post here.


Death of Sophonisba. To find out more about the Carthaginian heroine Sophonisba, see this Wikipedia article: link; for information about the image: image source.


Round-Up: May 13

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Here's something new - a Latin proverbs "slideshow" that I've prepared to go with Justin Schwamm's new Tres Columnae online Latin courses - what do you think? You can find out more about this new proverb project here: Lectio Prima: Mater in Proverbiis.



HODIE: ante diem tertium Idus Maias. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

MORE FABLES: Here are today's fables from the Ictibus Felicibus project. These fables ALL have long marks, plus stress marks for easy reading, and the poems have meter marks, too, along with an easy-to-read prose presentation of the story:
I've picked out my favorite one, the story of the overprotective monkey mother, De Simia et Natis, to share with you here in the blog - and there's a great illustration below:
Sīmia, ut ferunt, cum peperit gemellōs, alterum dīligit, alterum negligit, erat puerpera cum gemellīs, atque cum incidisset terror, vītātūra perīculum, dīlectum prehendit ulnīs. Quem, dum praeceps fugitat, collīdit petrae, atque ēnecat: neglectus autem, quī in hirsūtō haeserat tergō fugientis, mānsit incolumis.
TODAY'S MOTTOES & PROVERBS: You can get access to ALL the "proverb of the day scripts" (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

3-Word Mottoes: Today's 3-word motto is Nitor in adversum (English: I struggle against adversity).

3-Word Proverbs: Today's 3-word proverb is Orta omnia cadunt (English: All things that rise up fall).

Rhyming Proverbs: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Est homo vix natus ex omni parte beatus (English: Hardly any man is born blessed in every way).

Vulgate Verse: Today's verse is Caeli enarrant gloriam Dei (Psalms 18:2). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Elizabethan Proverb Commentary: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Multis ictibus deiicitur quercus: With many strokes is an Oke overthrowen. Nothing is so strong, but by little and little may be brought downe. Wherfore yong men ought not to be discouraged by the greatnesse of an enterprise, so it be honest, for by continuance, seme it never so hard, it may be reclaimed and overcome.

Today's Poem: Today's poem is from the rhymes collected by Wegeler, with a word list at NoDictionaries.com:
Ridenti domino nec caelo crede sereno,
Ex facili causa dominus mutatur et aura.
English: "Trust not a smiling master or a clear sky; the master changes easily as does the wind." Of course, it's easy to get excited about the good weather or a happy boss - but be careful!

For an image today, here is an illustration for the story of the monkey mother, De Simia et Natis: