Thursday, September 3, 2009

Proverb Round-Up + Latin Poetry Widget 4: Horace (1)

Thanks to everybody who wrote me about the proverbs - it's nice to know that people are enjoying those. So, here's the plan for September - I will keep on publishing the little poems, but I will also include the proverb round-up, too. This is a very busy month for me, but I think that will work! :-)

HODIE: ante diem tertium Nonas Septembres. You can add a Roman calendar as a widget in your blog or webpage, or display it as a Google Calendar: here's how.

TODAY'S TWITTER:

Vita Caesaris: You can see my IVLIVS CAESAR feed with a sentence from Plutarch's Life of Caesar each day in Greek, Latin and English. Today's Latin portion begins the sordid affair of Publius Clodius: Publius erat Clodius patricio genere natus, opibusque et facundia clarus, libidine autem, audacia et impudicitia nemini nequissimo secundus.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Proverbia feed of Latin proverbs which I "tweet" while I am online each day (in English, too). Here's one from today about obedience and authority: Qui nescit oboedire, is nesciet imperare (English: He who does not know how to obey will not know how to command).

TODAY'S PROVERBS:

You can get access to all the proverb of the day scripts (also available as random proverb scripts) at the SchoolhouseWidgets.com website.

Audio Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's audio Latin proverb is Publica fama non semper vana (English: Common gossip is not always groundless). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

Proverbium Perbreve of the Day: Today's two-word proverb is: Tibicen vapulat (English: The piper gets a beating - even when something is not his fault; a fuller form of the proverb is tibicen vapulat, coquo peccante or si quid peccasset coquus, tibicen solebat vapulare, "the piper gets a beating when it's really the fault of the cook").

Proverbium Breve of the Day: Today's three-word proverb is: Orta omnia cadunt (English: All things that have risen up fall... in other words, "what goes up, must come down").

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Omnis caro faenum et omnis gloria eius quasi flos agri (Isaiah 40:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's animal proverb is Minores leporem canes reperiunt, maiores capiunt (English: The smaller dogs find the rabbit; the bigger dogs catch him).

Proper Name Proverb of the Day: Today's proper name proverb is Facilis descensus Averno (English: Easy is the descent to Avernus... getting out is what's hard!).

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἐλέφας μῦν οὐ δάκνει (English: An elephant does not bite a mouse). If you look at the Greek Proverb of the Day widget, you'll see it comes with a Latin translation, too.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Ictibus Felicibus: Today's fable with macrons and accent marks is Leo et Vulpes, the story of how the fox outwitted the lion.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow is DE ALAUDA ET PULLIS EIUS, a story about a bird who has a good understanding of human nature!

POETRY WIDGET PROJECT:

For more about this poetry project, see this previous post. This is the second group of poems: 9 new ones, plus 41 from previous posts, for a total of 50 on our way to 366 poems for the widget! Today's poems come from Horace, so they are not free-standing poems. Please let me know if you think they work as excerpted here; my hope is that the lines can make sense on their own. In selecting these verses, I tried to stick to the basic dactylic and iambic meters, rather than any of the more complicated lyric meters. I did include some Archilochian and Alcmanic verses, but these are built on a dactylic base, so I hope that they will be easy to scan at sight. This is the first set from Horace; I'll have four more sets later.

Discit enim citius meminitque libentius illud
quod quis deridet quam quod probat et veneratur.

Source: Horace - dactylic - Epist. 1.2 (Dictionary Help)

Beatus ille qui procul negotiis,
ut prisca gens mortalium,
paterna rura bubus exercet suis
solutus omni faenore.

Source: Horace - iambic - Epode (Dictionary Help)

Infernis neque enim tenebris Diana pudicum
liberat Hippolytum,
nec Lethaea valet Theseus abrumpere caro
vincula Pirithoo.

Source: Horace - Archilochian - Carm. 4.7 (Dictionary Help)

Cum semel occideris et de te splendida Minos
fecerit arbitria,
non, Torquate, genus, non te facundia, non te
restituet pietas.

Source: Horace - Archilochian - Carm. 4.7 (Dictionary Help)

Sic quia perpetuus nulli datur usus et heres
heredem alterius velut unda supervenit undam,
quid vici prosunt aut horrea?

Source: Horace - dactylic - Epist. 2.2 (Dictionary Help)

Quis scit an adiciant hodiernae crastina summae
tempora di superi?

Source: Horace - Archilochian - Carm. 4.7 (Dictionary Help)

Sed satis est orare Iovem quae ponit et aufert;
det vitam, det opes; aequum mi animum ipse parabo.

Source: Horace - dactylic - Epist. 1.18 (Dictionary Help)

Nullius addictus iurare in verba magistri,
quo me cumque rapit tempestas, deferor hospes.

Source: Horace - dactylic - Epist. 1.1 (Dictionary Help)

Vivere si recte nescis, decede peritis.
Lusisti satis, edisti satis atque bibisti;
tempus abire tibi est, ne potum largius aequo
rideat et pulset lasciva decentius aetas.

Source: Horace - dactylic - Epist. 2.2 (Dictionary Help)






Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.


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