Thursday, March 5, 2009

Round-Up: March 5

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 18, which contains this great saying: Cani indicium sunt temporis, non sapientiae - ah, if only it were otherwise! :-)

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one I really liked for its elegant play on words: Non nova sed nove (that can be a good motto for those of taking the old things and sharing them in new ways - online!).

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Homo homini lupus (English: Man is a wolf to man - a famous saying adapted from Plautus). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Non potest civitas abscondi supra montem posita (Matt. 5:14). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate verse of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Latin Animal Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Irretit muscas, transmittit aranea vespas. (English: The spiderweb traps the flies, but lets the wasps through - an ingenious allegory of the law attributed to Anacharsis). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ὀυκ ἔστιν ἐν πολέμῳ δὶς ἁμαρτάνειν (English: It is not possible to err twice in war - and the field of battle is indeed a very unforgiving place, where things literally are a matter of life and death). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is De Alauda et Pullis Eius, the story of the lark who was able to read the signs of the times with great insight!

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE EQUO ET ASINO (the story of the proud horse and the humble donkey). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments. This is one of those illustrations where Barlow actually shows both stages of the story; if you look carefully in the background, you will see the conclusion of the story, where the donkey confronts the horse when he has become a broken down hack:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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