Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Round-Up: March 4

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Latin Via Proverbs: Group 17, which includes this great saying, whose truth is known to every language teacher and every language student: Repetitio mater memoriae.

Proverbiis Pipilo: You can see my Twitter feed, full of proverbs while I am online each day - here's a recent one about the power of money (watch out for the word order here, especially given the ambiguous forms!): Pecuniae oboedient omnia.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Cicada vocalior (English: More talkative than a cricket - although the sound is one I am waiting anxiously to hear, since I am very much ready for summer to arrive, even as we have snow on the ground right now!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Vulgate Verse of the Day: Today's verse is Debet in spe, qui arat, arare (I Cor. 9:10). You can use the Javascript to include the Vulgate verse of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πτερὸν ἀετοῦ πτεροῖς ἄλλων μιγνύεις (English: You're mixing the feather of an eagle with other birds' feathers - an avian version of mixing apples and oranges!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEONE AMATORIO (the sad story of the lion in love). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Simplified Fables: I'm now presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, in a SIMPLIFIED version (same story, but in simpler sentences) - with a SLIDESHOW presentation to go along with it, too. Today's Simplified fable is Fable 48: De Leone et Urso, the story of how the fox got the better of both a lion and a bear.

Journey to the Sea: As some of you may know, I occasionally publish articles in this very nice little online journal managed by Randy Hoyt - this month, I've got an article entitled Life of Aesop: The Wise Fool and the Philosopher, which includes the famous incident of the stolen figs, which you can see illustrated here - and yes, this is Francis Barlow, the same fellow who illustrated the Aesop's fables book!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available at Amazon.com.

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