Monday, January 5, 2009

Round-Up: January 5

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog, "Posthius's Aesop" - an explanation of how I put together a series of wiki pages for the fables of Aesop published in 1566 with Latin verses by Posthius. You can see Posthius's Aesop at the Aesop wiki: enjoy!

Comenius - Lexicon Project: The Comenius Lexicon project is one week old and going incredibly well! We've digitized over 80 pages so far! For those of you who would like to get involved, you can find out more at the Lexicon wiki, which also includes easy step by step instructions for getting started. Thanks to everybody who has been helping out with this!

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Vulgate Verses: Group 5, which contains this lovely saying about grace: Super argentum et aurum gratia bona.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Natura abhorret a vacuo (English: Natures abhors a vacuum - a crucial dictum in the history of science, and the challenge to the traditional teachings of the Catholic Church posed by Torricelli's vacuum tube). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb (including some information about Torricelli's experiment), visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Τὸν τετελευτηκότα μὴ κακολόγει, ἀλλὰ μακάριζε (English: Do not revile the departed, but rather call him blessed - notice that the word κακολόγει is one in which the accent marking gives you a clue as to the form of speech, imperative rather than indicative). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 71: Agricola et Filii, the famous fable of the lesson a father taught his quarrelsome sons by using a bundle of sticks.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE URSO ET ALVEARI (a very wise fable by the Renaissance author Abstemius). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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