Sunday, January 4, 2009

Round-Up: January 4

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Lupus et Ciconia, a Latin version of LaFontaine's fable.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Rarus fidus amicus (English: A faithful friend is rare - a story wonderfully illustrated in Aesop's fable about the two "friends" who ran into a bear!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, along with a version of the fable of the bear by Caspar Barth, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἄκουε τὰ ἀπὸ καρδίας (English: Listen to the words of the heart... for us, the heart has become the seat of emotions primarily, but in Greek it is also the location of inclination, intention, reasoning, etc.). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ASINO LEONIS PELLE INDUTO (the story of the donkey who disguised himself as a lion). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 70: Nutrix et Lupus, the story of the wolf who foolishly believed a nanny's threat - notice the wolf looking in at the window!




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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