Monday, December 22, 2008

Round-Up: December 22

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog, "Quizzes for Learning" - an outline about how to make the best use of Quia.com quizzes as a positive learning experience.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is Vulgate Verses: Group 3, which includes this wonderful saying from II Corinthians: Estis templum Dei vivi.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Cuique suum studium (English: To each his own enthusiasm - a great saying for all Latin students to keep in mind: you should discover what you are most passionate about in your study of Latin, and pursue that goal; don't let anybody else decide that for you). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἅπας μήν ἀὴρ ἁετῲ περάσιμος· ἅπασα δὲ χθὼν ἀνδρὶ γενναίῳ πατρίς (English: The eagle can cross any stretch of air, and the excellent man is at home in any land - in other words, your quality of spirit can free you to be a 'citizen of the world'). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE AUCUPE ET PERDICE (the story of the partridge who tried to strike a bargain with the birdcatcher). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 57: Lepus et Testudo, the famous story of the race between the tortoise and the hare.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Corde Natus Ex Parentis (a hymn with lyrics by the 4th-century poet Prudentius). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:




Aesop's Fables in Latin now available for pre-order at Amazon.com!

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