Sunday, December 21, 2008

Round-Up: December 21

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Ning Blog: I've posted something that might be of interest in my Ning Blog, "Quia Quizzes for Frequently Used Nouns" (an explanation of the different noun quiz materials I've created at Quia.com, along with tips about the best order in which to do the quizzes).

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is De Vulpe et Uva, a Latin version of LaFontaine's fable of the fox and the grapes.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Maximae divitiae non desiderare divitias (English: The greatest wealth is not to desire wealth - a good motto to keep in mind during an economic downturn!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Πέτρας σπείρεις (English: You are sowing stones... which is to say: nothing is going to result from your efforts - you need to sow seeds instead). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE VITULA ET BOVE (the sad story of a heifer who did not understand the value of hard work). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 55: Canis et Umbra, the famous story of the greedy dog who was fooled by his own reflection.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is Silens Nox (Silent Night - seven different versions, in fact!). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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