Monday, December 15, 2008

Round-Up: December 15

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

Bestiaria Latina Podcasts: Today's audio podcast is LaFontaine in Latin: De Rana et Bove, a Latin version of LaFontaine's fable about the frog who tried to equal the ox in size.

Technology Tips: I've posted a quick online tutorial today about How to Create an Audio-Vidoe Slideshow with iPhoto and How to Create an Image Slideshow in Ning.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Cito maturum, cito putridum (English: Quickly ripe, quickly rotten... in other words: Take your time!). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Κρυσοῦ λαλοῦντος, πᾶς ἀπρακτείτω λόγος (English: When money is talking, every word shall be worthless - a proverb you might apply to the disaster in Illinois right now, with all the scandal surrounding Obama's successor). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE ACCIPITRE COLUMBAM INSEQUENTE (a great story about a hawk and a dove illustrating the "Golden Rule"). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 50: Piscator et Pisciculus, the story of the little fish who was caught by a fisherman.

Latin Christmas Carols: Today's Christmas song in Latin is In Dulci Iubilo (a 14th century song by the German mystic Heinrich Suso). You can use the Javascript to include the Christmas carol of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's song, visit the Gaudium Mundo Christmas Carol website, where you will find the lyrics to the song in Latin, along with links to additional online information about the song:



The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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