Saturday, November 29, 2008

Round-Up: November 29

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. Also, check out the Aesopus Ning - that's a new interactive space I've set up for anyone who wants to discuss Latin fables and proverbs, or blog about their own Latin adventures.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Scabiosa ovis totum inquinat gregem (English: A mangy sheep infects the entire flock - something like the English saying about "one rotten apple"). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἕμπροσθεν κρημνὸς, ὄπιθεν λύκοι (English: A cliff in front of you, and wolves behind - a more down-to-earth example of a "Scylla and Charybdis" scenario, or, as we say in English, "between a rock and a hard place"). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE CANE ET BOVE (the famous story of the dog in the manger). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 56: Anus et Anser, the story of the goose that laid the golden egg - a story people often don't associate with Aesop's fables, but it is indeed part of the Aesop tradition. Here is Barlow's illustration:




The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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