Friday, November 28, 2008

Round-Up: November 28

Here is a round-up of today's blog posts - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email. Also, check out the Aesopus Ning - that's a new interactive space I've set up for anyone who wants to discuss Latin fables and proverbs, or blog about their own Latin adventures.

Latin Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ars varia vulpi, ars una echino maxima (English: The fox has various tricks, the hedgehog has one trick, a great one - a saying that goes back to the archaic Greek poet Archilochus). You can use the Javascript to include the Latin proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog. Meanwhile, to read a brief essay about this proverb, visit the AudioLatinProverbs.com website.

Greek Proverb of the Day: Today's proverb is Ἀετὸν κορώνη ἐρεσχελεῖ (English: The crow is teasing the eagle - and hopefully the crow will not get herself into too much trouble as a result!). You can use the Javascript to include the Greek proverb of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - and each Greek proverb also comes with a Latin version.

Fable of the Day: Today's fable of the day from Barlow's Aesop is DE LEAENA ET VULPE (the story of the debate between the lioness and the fox about the size of their litters). You can use the Javascript to include the fable of the day automatically each day on your webpage or blog - meanwhile, to find out more about today's fable, visit the Ning Resource Page, where you will find links to the text, commentary, as well as a discussion board for questions and comments.

Latin Via Fables: Grammar Commentary: I'm presenting the "Barlow Aesop" collection, fable by fable, with my commentary on each (a more expanded commentary than is possible within the confines of the book). Today's grammar commentary is Fable 35: Rusticus et Coluber, the story of the man who foolishly brought home a snake - and was surprised to find out that the snake was not very nice. Here is Barlow's illustration:




The Aesopus Ning is now open for business - so for more fables and to share your questions and comments with others, come visit the Ning!


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